Velociraptor (Lego)

“Heads up, fellow dinosaur lovers! Dr. Bella Bricking and Beth Buildit here! Be brave and be alert! Today we’re going to examine a very dangerous Lego dinosaur: Velociraptor! That’s why I’m wearing this protective gear!”

“Doc, that’s a fencing mask.”

“Yes, I know that, Beth. This was all I could afford on a paleontologist’s salary.”

“Yikes. Sorry.”

image

“Anyway, here are the eight pieces that make up our Velociraptor. When assembled, the animal measures 7 cm tall and slightly over 12 cm long. It is coloured pale and bright orange with reddish brown stripes, off white teeth and claws, and yellow eyes.”

image

“There’s some decent articulation on this critter, Doc. The mouth opens, the head rotates a full 360 degrees, and the arms and legs also have a wide range of motion. Also, it’s pretty cool how the teeth are hidden when the mouth is closed.”

“Indeed, Beth. Also note that the feet are designed to attach to a baseplate, the hands can grip Lego accessories, and the four studs on the back allow a minifigure to ride the Velociraptor. Not that I would want to do such a thing!”

image

“I know, Doc, it’s cool. But what’s not cool is that there are no feathers to be found on this raptor. The size is off as well. This is more like a Utahraptor in comparison to us. Jurassic Park strikes again!”

“I’m afraid so, Beth. Nevertheless, the Velociraptor has appeared in more sets than any other Lego dinosaur. Our version is from 5887: Dino Defense HQ. A green one features in 5884: Raptor Chase.. And this year’s Jurassic World line features Blue and Delta in 75917: Raptor Rampage and Charlie and Echo in 75920: Raptor Escape.

“That’s a lot of raptors in one paragraph.”

image

“Yes, it is. Now quickly, Beth, tell everyone your final thoughts before it gets too dangerous around here!”

“Well, despite the lack of feathers, there’s no denying that this is a fun toy. The poseability’s good, the raptor definitely looks ferocious, and the studs allow for imaginative play. Should be appealing to dinosaur or Lego fans, or in this case, both.”

image

“Oh my! Do be careful, Beth!”

“Relax, Doc, this is what I was made for. Literally. And take it easy, folks, we’ll be back again real soon!”

image

Moropus (CollectA)

Chalicotheres were an unusual family of ungulates related to the similarly extinct brontotheres as well as extant horses, rhinos, and tapirs. At over 8 feet tall, Moropus was one of the largest chalicotheres. Unlike its smaller relatives, it appears to have walked on its palms as opposed to its knuckles.

image

The 2015 CollectA Moropus stands just under 13 cm tall and measures about 14 cm long. It has been sculpted in what looks to be a casual walking pose with its head turned to the left and its right paw raised. Its main colour is tawny brown, just like an African lion. Darker brown is used for the nostrils, the fur on the cheeks, the mane, and the tuft on the tail. The underbelly is white, the claws are very dark grey, the eyes are black, the inside of the mouth is dark pink, and the teeth are white.

image

Looking at the head of the Moropus, one can easily see the familial resemblance to horses, although it really looks more like a fusion of a horse and a camel. One can almost hear it snorting derisively as it forages for food. The open mouth reveals small rows of teeth extending far back. The mane running down the neck is short like a Przewalski’s horse and the fur covering the body is beautifully sculpted.

image

The Moropus’ limbs are long and graceful, but also quite muscular. The huge claws on its front paws would have been ideal for stripping leaves and bark off trees, digging for roots and tubers, and for defence against predators. Oh, and peering at the underside of this beast, we can clearly see that it is a male. All of CollectA’s recent prehistoric mammals have been male. Personally, I think it would be nice to see at least one female in the future. Perhaps a mighty cave bear with her cub.

image

The CollectA Moropus is easily the best of the admittedly few chalicothere toys. It’s big and impressive-looking, finely sculpted, has a realistic colour scheme, and, as far as I can tell at least, no anatomical inaccuracies. In a plastic world largely dominated by mammoths and cats, this is a welcome and wonderful touch of variety.

image

Thanks go out once again to FaunaFigures.com for this and many other great toys!

Pteranodon (Lego)

“Hello again, fellow dinosaur lovers! Dr. Bella Bricking and Beth Buildit here, at your service!”

“What’s up with that flight cap and goggles, Doc?

“Well, Beth, today we’re going to be reviewing that iconic denizen of the Cretaceous skies, the Lego Pteranodon! So I figured I’d dress the part, you know!”

“Ah, gotcha. Well, let’s get on with it then.”

image

“Unlike those Coelophysis we reviewed last time, Beth, the Lego Pteranodon requires some assembly. It is made of five parts: the main body, the wings, the skull, and the mandible. The latter two are made of rubberized plastic to ensure safety and durability. When assembled, the Pteranodon’s mouth opens wide and its wings can flap. It has four studs on its back and two sockets in its belly, allowing it to be mounted as shown. Also note that the feet are sculpted similar to minifigure hands, enabling them to grasp a variety of Lego items.”

image

“Not that they were actually capable of carrying off things that way in real life, right, Doc?”

“That is correct, Beth. From the tip of the bill to the toes, the Pteranodon measures 10 cm long and the wingspan is a respectable 20 cm, making it approximately in scale with minifigures such as ourselves.”

image

“Colours are pretty decent too, Doc. Light brown and dark brown with red markings on the head, and yellow eyes. This critter comes from set 5883-1: Tower Takedown. A green one showed up in set 5888-1: Ocean Interceptor and a red and grey one features in set 75915-1: Pteranodon Capture.

image

“Oh yeah, and all three versions have thick black markings around their eyes that make them look like they’re teed off.”

“Those poor things! Come on, Beth, let’s give this one a little cheering up!”

image

“Whee! So what is your final word on the Lego Pteranodon, Beth?”

“Definitely an improvement over those Coelophysis, Doc. It’s bigger, it’s got moving parts, it’s unmistakeable as a Pteranodon, and most of all, it’s fun to play with. Just like you’re doing right now.”

image

“Bingo, Beth! Toodle-oo, fellow dinosaur lovers, see you again soon!”

“Ugh. Fish breath.”