Corythosaurus (CollectA)

Thanks to its distinctive rounded crest that resembles a helmet when viewed from the side, Corythosaurus is one of the most recognizable hadrosaurids. It’s also one of the best-known, with multiple complete skeletons, more than twenty fossil skulls, and mounted specimens in museums throughout North America. Like its relative Parasaurolophus, Corythosaurus‘ crest may have functioned as a vocalization chamber.

CollectA released this Corythosaurus toy back in 2009. Rearing up on its hind legs with its head turned sharply to the right, it measures 9.5 cm tall and 15.5 cm long. Its main colours are a dull shade of orange, copper brown, and yellow. Red-orange is used for the crest and the tall ridge running down the spine. The eyes are black and the flanks are streaked with pale blue and red.

The detailing on this toy is typical of CollectA’s early years, meaning it’s not very impressive. The crest and the vertebrae are ribbed, the skin is speckled with small bumps, and there are heavy wrinkles at the neck, shoulders, hips, legs, and underbelly.

This Corythosaurus doesn’t score very high in the accuracy department either. For starters, the tail and the arms are too short. The body is too wide, especially the hips. The hands look more like the paws of a mammal as opposed to the “mittens” that we know hadrosaurids possessed. And finally, the muzzle lacks the signature duckbill, making the head look more like a horse’s than a proper Corythosaurus.


Something of a contrast to the CollectA Olorotitan.

Overall, not a very good toy, I’m afraid. Considering how CollectA has done some magnificent new versions of their old toys, I hope they eventually release an improved Corythosaurus. In the mean time, this one is recommended only if you’re really fond of hadrosaurids.

Pelecanimimus (De Agostini)

Back in the 1990s there was a publication called “Dinosaurs!”. Publisher De Agostini would introduce to us the dinosaurs and their world in many issues. One special dinosaur would get a titlee story, there were stories about other dinosaurs and prehistoric beasts, a 3D – poster in the middle of each issue and on the last side my former idol Dr. David Norman would answer questions about features and lifestyle of the fascinating animals.
Only now, a few months ago, I found out that there was a figure line closely resembling the painted dinosaurs from the particular issues. I got myself some of them by a trade.
One of these was Pelecanimimus, an Ornithomimid from the lower Cretaceous of Spain, as tall as a man. He is regarded as one of the oldest representative of the Ornothomimid group. Compared to the descendands like name-giving Ornithomimus, Pelecanimimus had teeth. And he had a strange extension at the head protruding backwards out of the skull. Maybe it was for intimidation.

This little neat figure is 5 centimetres (1,9 inches) tall and 10,2 centimetres (4,1 inches) long.
It differs from the normal representations of theropods back in the nineties, when big players like T.rex or Allosaurus ruled the theropod figure territory. This little figure probably was a welcome relief from this dominance.

For balance it has to lean on the forearms, but interestingly this does not really attract special attention, since the overall vivid posture and sculpt is really succesful for a figure from this time.
Of course it´s not scientifically correct. It lacks feathers, the hands are not pronated. On the other hand, there is a nice throat pouch and the extension of the skull is there as well. The jaws look as if the animal is gnarling at something .
The colour is orange – tan and yellow at the belly which suits the animal quite well, although it´s also a little boring.

Overall, this is a really nice figure to own. I only know one other Pelecanimimus figure by Kazunari Araki, which is a lot better of course. But De Agostini Pelecanimimus does not claim to be a model figurine, it is a toy rising from the publication “Dinosaurs!”, which was clearly addressed at children. And so is this figure. It´s one of the first hinting at the dinosaur-bird-relationship. From me it gets 3,5 (4) out of five stars.

Scan lots on ebay to find one. Or maybe someone on the Dinosaur Toy Forum knows other sources.

Allosaurus (Kaiyodo Dinotales 1:20 Collection)

A couple years back I put together a poll on the Dinosaur Toy Forum with the goal of compiling a top ten list of the best Allosaurus toys ever produced. It was no small task, up until the 1990’s the Allosaurus only played second fiddle to Tyrannosaurus in the popularity contest. Since then other theropods have pushed it down the list; Velociraptor, Spinosaurus, Carnotaurus to name a few. Allosaurus is still a favorite of mine though. A perfectly proportioned, generalized predator that ruled the Jurassic, even if it was not among the largest theropods it was certainly one of the most successful. That top 10 list ended up with a lot of great contenders and naturally the Papo Allosaurus won the day. At the time I had considered this 1:20 scale Allosaurus by Kaiyodo to be the best Allosaurus figure. It was a perfect blend of accuracy, size, detail, craftsmanship. But I didn’t own the thing at that time, and now I do. So now that I have it in-hand how does it hold up? Is it worth the often expensive price tag? Is it truly the best Allosaurus out there?

Standing 9” tall and measuring about 17” long, this rendition of the Jurassic carnivore is certainly going to take up some shelf space and draw attention in a crowd. The heavy detailing only helps in this regard. Raised scutes are immediately noticeable along the back and reminiscent of those on a crocodile. Wrinkled folds of skin are sculpted along the neck, around the shoulders and legs, and down the length of the tail. The head is adorned with not only those diagnostic brown horns but smaller hornlets at the corners of the mouth. That said, the detailing seems to suddenly diminish below the knees, on the arms, and along the underside where the body is nearly smooth in some places, with only a minimal hint of scales and other bodily adornments. The feet have those bird-like scutes we’ve come to expect on theropod models but the sudden lack of detail on these parts is rather jarring. Obvious seams along the neck, jaw, arms, knees, and tail don’t help enhance the realism of this piece either.

The accuracy here is pretty good. I can’t find much to complain about but some will no doubt consider this model to be shrink-wrapped. The torso is nicely rounded with the extremities lean and muscular. The head is quite obviously Allosaurus and even the neutral facing hands posses the enlarged thumb claw so frequently omitted. The tail base could use some thickening but overall this is a very modern looking Allosaurus with some obvious Greg Paul influences. This model was sculpted by Matsumura Shinobu whose other dinosaurs are in very much the same style which seems to be popular in Japan, where this model originates.

The most off-putting feature on this model is its lack-luster, static posture. Not only are both feet planted flat on the ground, but the knees are not bent at all, giving the figure an unnatural appearance. In fact, without some kind of support the model will tilt back and rest on its tail and looks like one of those fainting goats. The mouth is open with the arms just sort of dangling there. This is a shame because it makes for a really unnatural looking pose on a very life-like sculpture.

This model comes in a couple different color schemes with mine being the brown variant painted in yellowish, sandy color tones. The claws are a dark brown color, teeth white, inside of the mouth, pink, and the eyes meticulously painted orange with yellow irises and black pupils. The other variant is green in color. Other colors exist of this model as well, including one that’s entirely painted blue. But the blue model also possesses minor sculptural differences too and is a part of the Kaiyodo Dinoland collection, unlike this piece.

All in all my opinion about this model has changed little upon seeing it. It’s still a fantastic piece and easily among the best Allosaurus figures out there. For its price point however there are some glaring issues that must be acknowledged. Lazy detailing, visible seams, and an uninspired pose all conspire against what is simultaneously one of the most detailed and accurate Allosaurus models to date. I was able to acquire mine for about $35 but the prices vary a lot and seems to have gone up recently, especially on eBay where they range between $30- $188! Even the cheaper models have expensive shipping prices so buyers beware. In the end though this is a must have model for those who are still fans of this once popular but now forgotten theropod.