Concavenator (CollectA)

Review by Nathan Morris (Takama), photos by Bokisaurus and Simon. Edited by Plesiosauria.

Concavenator corcovatus (meaning hunchback hunter from Cuenca). Was a 6-meter long, and primitive carcharodontosaurian that lived 130 milion years ago during the early Cretaceous Period. It was discovered last year [2010] at the Las Hoyas Plateau, and is notable for a hump that pertruded from its back. It’s unsure what this hump was used for, some suggest that it was used to regulate body temperature, other think it was used for communication in courtship. It is also notable for sprouting quil knobs on its arms, as evidenced by quill knobs on its forearm bones, a feature regarded as a connection between early theropods and birds.

Concavenator CollectA

CollectA’s Concavenator was revealed as part of their standard-size line for 2011. As it was discovered so recently, this figure is probably the very first of this animal ever to be released. CollectA seemed to have done their research on it as the arms have been sculpted with the quills intact and the shape of the skull is about correct, featuring individually sculpted teeth. It even has a tiny little cloacal opening. The coloring however, is dull in my opinion, it is covered in dark brown with a tan underside and the quills and hump have also been given a showey pinkish red coloring to show off the significant feature of this dinosaur. The eyes are nothing but little black dots and the claws are painted grey on all the limbs.

Concavenator CollectA

It is also a small figure that stands only 2 inches tall and 6 inches from head to tail, which is more or less average for CollectAs standard sized dinosaur collection. Overall, I say this is great figure in terms of accuracy, detailing, and obscurity, and I personaly love it.

Concavenator CollectA

Now available through eBay stores here

10 Responses to Concavenator (CollectA)

  1. It’s a really cool figure, but there is something not quite right about the lower jaw, and the paint job makes the “hump” resemble a giant zit. I wonder if the “hump” was really the base of some sort of much larger display that did not fossilize.

  2. Pingback: Concavenator (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd.) | The Dinosaur Toy Blog

  3. Ya era hora de que por fin se dignaran a realizar una réplica de algún dinosaurio de la Península Ibérica,pues se cuentan con los dedos de una mano (Miragaia y poco más).Lástima que la encargada de hacerlo sea Collecta,porque la verdad es que la calidad es baja.Parecía con las últimas creaciones que estaban subiendo el listón pero parece que otra vez vuelven a las andadas con ejemplares infantilizados y de baja calidad.

  4. I’m not very impressed by Concavenator. The figure I’d really like Carnegie to make is a good 1:40 Acrocanthosaurus!! It would look amazing, be very likely to sell well among kids and collectors, be a good size, and be the the only accurate 1:40 Acrocanthosaurus (the teeth on Battat’s don’t seem to be the right length).

  5. christian lambson

    I think that Safari should make a concavenater. Along with a balaur and a new ceratosaurus.

  6. christian lambson

    I wonder why concavenator’s hump is never shown as a sail?

  7. questo e’ bello

  8. Ich werde ihn auf jeden Fall in meine Sammlung einfügen der Concavenator ist großartig.
    Auch wenn die Bemalung ein bissischen Langweilig ist.

  9. A mi honesto entender es una figura bastante pobre, en cierto modo es una mala copia de la pintura de Raúl Martín. Sería interesante que Safari o Carnegie (cualquiera de las dos) hiciesen una réplica decente, sería extraordinario.
    Pero esta es muy pobre, quizás de lo peor de Collecta en este año junto con el Australovenator.

  10. There is doubt that the bumps on Concavenator’s arms are quill knobs. They are irregularly spaced which true quill knobs tend not to be, and their position is unusual and different to where quill knobs are found on birds and dromaeosaurs. Other animals, like some mammals, have the same sort of irregularly spaced bumps on various of their bones along intermuscular lines, which act as tendon attachment points.

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