Velocirapteryx (Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect by Kenner)

Review and photographs by Paleona

Before the advent of “Indominus rex“ in Jurassic World, a horde of “genetically mutated dinos gone bad” rampaged the 90’s. Scientists tampering with dinosaur DNA created horrific, “ultra-ferocious” hybrid dinosaurs! Or so the tag line for this crazy toy line states. The Chaos Effect line was released in 1998, following the Lost World: Jurassic Park toy line. They feature original sculpts, vivid color schemes, and electronic gimmicks. When looking at them, it’s hard not to think of descriptions such as, “radical” and “totally awesome”. Let’s take a look at one of the most popular designs from the line: the clever and deadly “Velocirapteryx.“

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Meant to be a splice of Velociraptor and Archaeopteryx, the first thing you’ll notice is that it’s got feathers! I find it ironic that the only raptor to sport feathers in the Jurassic Park toy line is a fictional hybrid. Of course, the feathering is not what a real Velociraptor would sport. It has a bit of a feather mohawk, some tall back feathers, a fan at the tip of its tail, and some very odd long feathers attached to an elongated third finger. Pulling back the right leg makes the arms lift up and the head shoot down. Apparently, this is also supposed to activate a screech, but mine does not have any fresh batteries. The action feature doesn’t work very well, as the arms are held very close to the body and often get stuck on the creature’s face.

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The base color for this abomination is a sickly, yellowish-cream. It vaguely reminds me of the facehugger and chestburster aliens of Hollywood fame, and in that regard gives it a creepy, monster-like look. The top of the animal features long red and black stripes, like the detailing of a fast car. It’s described as being “bred for mobility and ferocity”; this is apparent in the sleek physique and massive claws. Speaking of massive, this is also a large figure, at about 11″(28cm) long and 6″(15cm) tall.

It’s not even worth mentioning scientific accuracy here, as this is a fictional animal with a highly stylized design. I do find it interesting, though, that the tip of the snout is upturned, more like a true Velociraptor than any shown in the JP films.

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“Boy, do I hate being right all the time.”

The artists from Hasbro must have had a blast designing these beasts, and they really do look like cartoon illustrations come to life. While fun to look at, this “Velocirapteryx“ doesn’t really excel in playability. The action feature is faulty and it’s quite awkward to pose. If you’re a fan of monster toys, or you just like how it looks, you can find it most easily on eBay.

5 Responses to Velocirapteryx (Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect by Kenner)

  1. Actually, Indominus rex isn’t the first hybrid of the saga: every prehistoric animal in Jurassic Park is an hybrid. Just watch the first movie, Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World.

    • True enough, but the I. rex is the first hybrid that includes several dinosaurs; all we’re ever told in the older films is that they used frog DNA to fill in gaps for single dinosaur species. The Chaos Effect line hybrids are like the I. rex in that they’re combinations of dinosaurs. Though of course Indominus took it further and includes DNA of other extant species, as well.

  2. Honestly, its companion toy in the same size class (Paradeinonychus) is the better of the two.

    In a lot of ways, Jurassic World is basically Chaos Effect: The Movie (especially taking into account the additional hybrid dinosaurs appearing in the toyline and app game). Ultimasaurus would have made a much better Indominus. It’s a shame that, despite being the flagship creature of this line, the toy of Ultimasaurus never made it past the prototype stage.

    • I agree that the Paradeinonychus is a better toy; I’m probably going to review that one eventually, too. 🙂

  3. Bizarrely, this toy could technically be considered more accurate in wing anatomy than many depictions of Archaeopteryx, since the feathers are actually attached to the finger (even if it’s the 3rd and not the 2nd), thus avoiding the “wings…but with hands!!!” trope.

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