Iguanodon (CollectA)

Discovered in England by Gideon Mantell in 1835, Iguanodon was the second dinosaur to be formally named. Over the years, it has been depicted by paleoartists as a huge and horned lizard, then as an upright and rather dignified-looking biped, and most recently, as a quadrupedal browser that was capable of rearing up on its hind legs.

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The CollectA Iguanodon dates all the way back to 2007. It is reared up on its hind limbs with its head turned sharply to the left, as though there’s a predator incoming and this individual is preparing to defend itself. This stance gives the toy a height of slightly under 10 cm and a length of 16 cm. Main colours are peach and dark brown with thin white stripes, very dark brown claws, and beady black eyes.

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The sculpting on this toy is only average. A multitude of heavy wrinkles throughout, with muscular limbs and slightly arched vertebrae. Nothing to write home about. And while the hands have the correct shape, with the middle three fingers fused into a “mitten,” there’s a glaring problem. You know those thumb spikes that Iguanodon is so famous for? The ones that it may have used to defend itself against the likes of Megalosaurus? Well, the spikes on this toy have been painted just like the rest of the digits, making them look like regular old thumbs. Needless to say, that’s quite disappointing. I may head to the hobby shop sometime and see if I can touch up these spikes with a little paint.

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As well, the Iguanodon‘s neck is too long, its tail is too short, and its hind limbs look too stiff and straight. Also, the back of the head is so flat and straight, it’s almost at a 90 degree angle. On the plus side, the animal does have a rather friendly smile on its face.

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CollectA most definitely ranks at the top nowadays, but many of their earliest prehistoric figures are pretty sad. This Iguanodon is probably not the worst of them, but it certainly would be nice to see a new improved version someday. In the mean time, give this one a pass.

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2 Responses to Iguanodon (CollectA)

  1. Pingback: Ouranosaurus (CollectA) | Dinosaur Toy Blog

  2. CarnegieCollector

    He has quite a charming smile. I’ll give him that.

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