Category Archives: ceratopsian

Triceratops (Baby by CollectA)

Review and Photographs by Triceratops83, edited by Suspsy

CollectA has grown over the years from a curiosity producing mediocre figures at best to a leading brand rivaling Safari as the favourite makers of toy dinosaurs. One of their earlier, and admittedly better efforts was the Triceratops baby, released in 2007.

CollectA released several baby dinosaurs, most of which didn’t look very good (only a few of them actually looked like what they were supposed to). Until Papo and REBOR released their Triceratops juveniles, the only major competition this figure had was Safari’s. And while the Safari version was cuter, this CollectA baby is arguably more accurate.

This figure is 8.5 cm long and is a pudgy little thing. The body is very deep and the back arches strongly–perhaps a little too much. The tail is a nice length for Triceratops. The legs are thick and elephant-like, and although it has four toes on its hind feet, they are all planted on the ground, without the shortened inner digit. It only has four digits on the front limbs, and all are unfortunately hoofed, with no vestigial fingers. The left hind leg is bent at the ankle, giving the limb a weird bent look. The skin is wrinkled and lightly scaled.

The skull is the standout feature on this figure. The entire growth series of Triceratops is known and this toy matches a hatchling or young juvenile. The frill lies flat against the back and the horns are short and stubby. The epijugals, however, are weirdly thick and kinda look like jowls. Another drawback to the otherwise fine skull are the deep lines and wrinkles around the mouth and neck, giving it a baggy appearance.

The figure is mostly grey and dry brushed with a drab olive green. It’s a very dull and depressing paint job and gives the toy a mammalian look. The eyes are brown with a shiny black pupil. It’s a wonder they didn’t paint it blue to match the standard sized adult Triceratops (although they may have been trying to distance themselves from that particular model as it’s quite bad).

The CollectA Triceratops Baby is halfway to a good figure, mixing accuracy with, well, ugliness. The wrinkled skin, dull colours, and poorly sculpted limbs detract from what could have been the best baby Triceratops available. I’d still say the figure is worth getting, even though the Safari, Papo, and REBOR versions are more visually appealing. I hope that CollectA, with their improved quality, will one day update this toy.

Triceratops (Carnage Dinosaurs by ReSaurus)

Review and photos by EmperorDinobot, edited by Suspsy

Hello! This is your friendly neighborhood EmperorDinobot with another review! As you saw from my previous review, I absolutely love ReSaurus’ Carnage dinosaurs. It took me ten years to find most of them, but I finally succeeded! I especially love their articulation, and this Triceratops is no exception!

First, let me begin by pointing out some obvious features. First, the base. The ReSaurus herbivores all use the same base, but they each carry a different label depending on the dinosaur’s name. And second, when it comes to the ceratopsians, the Triceratops, the Protoceratops, and the Styracosaurus all use the exact same body sculpt, with just have a different head. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t unique!

As it is with all Carnage figures, the body is very detailed. There’s lots of folds and scales to look at. They seem to be hand-painted, and they pull off all sorts of excellent-looking shades. The Triceratops‘ body has a healthy shade of light brown covered with some slate blue on top. The head has several colours in order to make it fancier. The scales running through the back are in a darker grey, which makes them stand out. The cool thing about the Trike (unlike the Stegosaurus) is that the limbs have the right number of digits on each foot.


The head sculpt is impressive. It has numerous details around the frill and is very well-painted, as you can see. The jaws are articulated and detailed. While not pictured, you can see its tongue. It’s so nicely detailed that the left side of the face has sculpted scars which are painted. This Trike has seen some tough days! The tail has an inner wire, so you can pose it in whichever way you want. Details like that truly make a dinosaur figure special.

As always, I’m thoroughly impressed with this toy, even though it was released more than 15 years ago. These Carnage dinosaurs are in good scale with my Jurassic Park ones, and articulated dinosaurs are always welcome.

I found this figure out of sheer luck. It’s not easily found anymore, but it is absolutely worth it. This may be my favourite Triceratops figure of all time, and that’s saying something given that this is is a dinosaur that has been made into about a million different figures! It’s not just the fact that the size and the articulation are perfect. It’s just a really good sculpt; a really great figure with excellent paint. Same goes with the Styracosaurus, which was linked to earlier.


The titanic battle begins!

Styracosaurus (Tyco)

Review and photos by Lanthanotus, edited by Suspsy

Months ago, there was a call for completing the Tyco page of the DTB and I replied that I’d add a review. I intended to have a look for the Pteranodon, a figure I just then had acquired, but couldn’t manage to write down a review in time and eventually this was done by Gwangi. Then there was a second call more recently, and this time, I managed to review the last Tyco figure I can, because it’s the only one left in my puny collection that hasn’t already been reviewed . . .

. . . although technically, perhaps it is. Six years ago, Griffin reviewed Tyco’s Monoclonius and stated that “a Styracosaurus was also made by Tyco that is exactly the same as this toy except for its spiky frill and different colour scheme.” That pretty much sums it up, and not much more would need to be said, but since you worked yourself through that lengthy introduction, you’ll get a proper review.

Styracosaurus is a Late Cretaceous centrosaurine that inhabited a seasonal flood plain environment. The first specimen was found in the famous Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta, Canada, by Charles Sternberg and was scientifically named and described by Lawrence Lambe in 1913. There may be several species within the genus, but in the past, some that were counted towards Styracosaurus were already given their own genus. For this review, that does not matter anyway, as no species name is assigned to the toy.

Tyco’s Styracosaurus was released for the first wave of Dino-Riders back in 1988 and served as a beast of war for the heroic Valorians. The figure was also later released for the Smithsonian line with the only mould difference being the lack of lateral square gaps for attaching a harness. The toy is made of a light olive-green plastic that’s very rigid and breaks rather than bends, as can be seen in the left horn of that little fellow. Unlike most of its Tyco brethren, the Styracosaurus makes relatively minor use of its base colour. The figure is almost completely coloured in maroon-red and yellowish white, with just two stripes along its spine. The outsides of the legs reveal the odd green colour the figure is made from, but one can hardly recognize that pattern.

As noted earlier, the Styracosaurus shares its whole postcranial body with the Monoclonius. It stands on four short, sturdy, and straight legs with four toes on the hind legs and five on the front ones. The tail is short and slightly elevated off the ground. It provides the action feature of this figure where moving the tail from side to side results into the head bashing from one side to the other, opposite to the tail. The head of the Styracosaurus is nicely sculpted and fairly detailed in the front. The frill’s horns are too straight and placed in weird angles, and there’s one less pair of horns than the real deal. With the exception of this inaccuracy, the whole body morphology is not exactly false but far outdated. Back in the late 80s’, however, this ceratopsian was quite a fair reconstruction and the beady eyes so typical for Tyco’s dinosaurs add a lot of charm and liveliness.

This Styracosaurus should appeal to many people besides Dino-Riders collectors. It is indeed a very nice toy with a neat and robust play feature. Having been discontinued for decades, the obvious way to obtain this model is through eBay. Without any armour or weapons, it can frequently be found for just a few bucks.