Category Archives: Geoworld

Doedicurus (Jurassic Hunters by Geoworld)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

When it comes to glyptodonts, only two species have ever been replicated in toy form. The first one is the standard Glyptodon, which has been made by many companies over the years (yet many have yet to be reviewed). And then there’s Doedicurus, the one glyptodont that most laypeople can tell is different from Glyptodon because of the spiky club on its tail that would make many ankylosaurs green with envy. Unlike Glyptodon, this animal has been made by fewer companies, with only Kaiyodo, Safari, and this one from Geoworld coming to mind.

The Geoworld model is not half bad for a model of this species. The carapace is covered with many little osteoderms just like in the fossils, but I can’t help but wonder if they are too big. The tail is sculpted correctly with the rings of bone covering it to look like the animal can extend or retract its tail (I’m not saying it could really do that, just that that’s how it looks to me). As for the club, it seems to match the fossils as well. The spikes on this model are somewhat sharp, so be careful should you give this to a kid who is prone to rough play.

The one thing I am not sure about accuracy-wise would be the head. I do not know much about mammals, and in case it was not obvious, I basically compared the model to images of the fossils themselves since they are well known. Reconstructing the face of a mammal seems to be a harder thing to do then reconstructing the face of an extinct dinosaur, so please forgive me for not knowing if this figure’s face is accurate or not. But just to help you decide, I will go ahead and describe it. The face is rounded just like it should be on a glyptodont. The head is also armoured, which is a correct thing to do, but the nostrils and ears are huge. This almost gives the animal a rodent-like appearance, when it’s supposed to be an armadillo.

The figure is painted in a mostly tan colour with the tiny osteoderms and head plate coloured in brown. The toe claws are painted brown as well and the eyes are painted red. In case you’re wondering, this 6″ figure is an entirely original creation from Geoworld, which I think is good, because we all know of the company’s misdeeds when it comes to the paleoart used in the fact cards that come with their models. On that note, the image on the card that comes with this model has not been ripped from any other source that I can think of. Instead, it shows a drawing of the animal that looks an awful lot like the model.


Overall, this looks like your typical Doedicurus and if you want one in your collection, I say you should pick one up if you see it at a store. Unfortunately, these mammal toys have become very hard to find outside of DeJankins, which has proven to be the best source of these models should you care to buy them. It’s a long road ahead to reviewing every Geoworld Jurassic Hunters model I have, so I’m glad to check this one off the list.

Argentinosaurus (Geoworld)

Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy

Well, we’ve had the good, the bad, and now it’s time for the . . . okay. Once more I delve into Geoworld’s collection of dinos to see if we get a gem or a dud. This time, from the second expedition, we have Argentinosaurus. With very few figures having been made of this species, I was curious to see another take on it by a different company. Will this inspire other companies to do the same? Well, let’s see . . .

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First, as always, let’s start with the source of irritation to most true paleontologists: the fact card. This does come with some good facts and figures for Argentinosaurus, with cards in multiple languages. The picture (and the figure, as they are very similar) doesn’t seem to be taken from any single paleoartist, but does seem to resemble Luis V. Rey’s drawing and, to an extent, the popular children’s TV show Dinosaur Train.

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On to the figure! It measures 9.0” long and 3.9” high, making it a mid-sized figure at the odd scale of 1:130. Being one of the largest land animals ever, it seems odd for it to be on the smaller size. The pose is decent, perhaps eating from a tree with its tail languidly swishing behind. Most the body is covered in blue with patchy purple spots and beige underneath. It has an odd pink splodge on the bottom jaw, looking like it has failed to put its lipstick on right. At least it did its nails right (matching black, very nice!)

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Accuracy for Argentinosaurus is difficult to gauge. The fossil evidence is fairly limited, consisting of vertebrae, ribs, and a few incomplete leg bones, so often other titanosaurs are used as blue prints to flesh out the final animal. From what is known, the figure isn’t bad (considering it’s Geoworld), with long, columnar legs, a long neck, and a fairly wide body. But the legs, belly, and neck feel a little too thin for such a big dinosaur. The bumps on its back are very much artistic licence, as no skin or osteoderms have been found for Argentinosaurus. It feels like it is based off Saltasaurus, a fellow titanosaur and another used as a template for a complete Argentinosaurus. It’s a bit odd, but some may like that.

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While this is certainly better than the first expedition figure I brought, it still feels a bit generic by most sauropod standards. Without looking at the underbelly or seeing it out of packaging, you might easily mistake it for an Apatosaurus. It is one of the few Argentinosaurus figures on the market, so if you want a bit of variety, I do recommend it, at least until another company makes a model of it.

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Well, those are the reviews for my first three Geoworld figures. Overall, I would say that this is a line that, while feeling very Chinasaur in certain areas, does have a few gems in the group, especially in the later lines. It is certainly a mixed bag, leaning towards the worst most of the time, especially compared to other companies. The plagiarism is also completely shameful and far too prevalent. They seem to have better models when they make fewer per line, as the first two produced 36 each, then 18 on the third, which shows in the poor quality of the early figures. Hopefully future lines of Geoworld will produce fewer figures at better quality, with less plagiarism, but who knows? Only time will tell.

Protoceratops (Geoworld)

Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy

The last time I reviewed a Geoworld figure, I mentioned I had bought a figure from each of the first three lines. I reviewed my favourite of the three first, which in my opinion was the best of what I have. Now it’s time for the worst of the three, a waste of money and plastic: Protoceratops. This early ceratopsian is a very common herbivore in the Upper Cretaceous rocks of Mongolia, often nicknamed the ‘sheep of the Cretaceous’, so you’d think it’d be easy to create an accurate model from even a small amount of research. Evidently, Geoworld disagreed.

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Geoworld is infamous for claims of scientific accuracy that are quickly proven wrong, and massive amounts of plagiarism. The First Expedition, as it’s known, is a good example of these problems. The first culprit is the fact card provided with each figure. While it does have useful information that children will appreciate and learn from, the picture of Protoceratops is clearly a plagiarised picture from early dinosaur books (can‘t find the exact author).

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Onto the figure itself. It measures 6.2” long and 3.0” high, making it oddly large for a Protoceratops. On the underbelly of the figure, it has a scale of 1:10, as the figures are made at a similar size and given different scales, which is very bizarre. The pose seems very odd, looking like the animal is prowling around like a big cat rather than in something more appropriate for a herbivorous dinosaur. The colour scheme is a mix of beige and browns, with a pair of reddish-brown stars on the frill as a possible display feature for the animal. While not directly plagiarising any palaeoartist, it does seem fairly similar to several pieces, such as the one from Charlie McGrady Studio.

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Onto scientific accuracy. If you have seen any of the early Geoworld figure reviews, you can probably see where this is going. We’ll start with the good points. The raised spines on the tail are present, the skull is the correct shape, and the front legs are shorter than the back legs. Now for the bad points. The skull and frill, though correctly shaped, seem much too small in comparison to the rest of the body. The neck far too long and the figure is very skinny in general. Though Protoceratops is generally thought to be more lean than the bulkier early incarnations, this seems way too skinny. While the front legs are fairly accurate, the back ones aren’t, as the ankle joint is far too far apart from the foot.

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Looking over this early figure from Geoworld, I am surprised they managed to get to a second line, let alone a further two more lines beyond that. This figure is very ugly in general, and its flaws stand out very badly. I really can’t recommend this figure, especially with the blatant plagiarism that is connected to it. There are much better figures of Protoceratops out there. This one can be avoided.

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