Category Archives: hadrosaur

Corythosaurus (CollectA)

Thanks to its distinctive rounded crest that resembles a helmet when viewed from the side, Corythosaurus is one of the most recognizable hadrosaurids. It’s also one of the best-known, with multiple complete skeletons, more than twenty fossil skulls, and mounted specimens in museums throughout North America. Like its relative Parasaurolophus, Corythosaurus‘ crest may have functioned as a vocalization chamber.

CollectA released this Corythosaurus toy back in 2009. Rearing up on its hind legs with its head turned sharply to the right, it measures 9.5 cm tall and 15.5 cm long. Its main colours are a dull shade of orange, copper brown, and yellow. Red-orange is used for the crest and the tall ridge running down the spine. The eyes are black and the flanks are streaked with pale blue and red.

The detailing on this toy is typical of CollectA’s early years, meaning it’s not very impressive. The crest and the vertebrae are ribbed, the skin is speckled with small bumps, and there are heavy wrinkles at the neck, shoulders, hips, legs, and underbelly.

This Corythosaurus doesn’t score very high in the accuracy department either. For starters, the tail and the arms are too short. The body is too wide, especially the hips. The hands look more like the paws of a mammal as opposed to the “mittens” that we know hadrosaurids possessed. And finally, the muzzle lacks the signature duckbill, making the head look more like a horse’s than a proper Corythosaurus.


Something of a contrast to the CollectA Olorotitan.

Overall, not a very good toy, I’m afraid. Considering how CollectA has done some magnificent new versions of their old toys, I hope they eventually release an improved Corythosaurus. In the mean time, this one is recommended only if you’re really fond of hadrosaurids.

Parasaurolophus (Baby)(Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

Review and photos by Quentin Brendel, edited by Suspsy

With its long, tubular crest protruding from the back of its skull, Parasaurolophus is one of the most easily-recognized hadrosaurids. The model to be reviewed today does not have much of one, being a juvenile animal. Safari Ltd’s rendition, while not perfect, is still a nice toy for collectors and children alike. This figure is stamped 1997, coming out a year after the original Wild Safari adult Parasaurolophus.

The dinosaur is posed so that it looks like it is calling out, with its head up and mouth open, perhaps to the adult. The primary colour on this figure is a brownish orange, which, unlike in the adult, is solid and does not fade to a darker shade. The underside is painted beige with hard edges. There is an intermediate colour between it and the orange which has feathered edges, though it lacks the intermediate colour on the right side of the torso. The most striking part of this colour scheme are the green dorsal markings. The back is painted a dark green with lighter green patches on top of it. These markings are also on the top of the crest as well as on the dinosaur’s face. On the sides are smaller green spots which resemble the rosettes of a jaguar. On mine, these are asymmetrical with more spots on the right side. The nails are painted a navy blue and the inside of the mouth is pink. The eyes have black pupils on yellow and a white spot to simulate a reflective surface.

The neck is very thin and goose-like. Recent reconstructions depict Parasaurolophus holding its neck forward and being better-muscled, similar to a horse. The hands each have five fingers (one too many), however, only the outermost digit should have a claw. The others were bound together in a hoof-like structure with the metacarpals being longer. It is not to scale with the adult and should be smaller.

Hadrosaurs are known not only from skeletal remains, but many skin impressions as well. This makes it much easier (or harder, depending on how you look at it) to make an accurate model. The skin of the baby Parasaurolophus has large, wrinkly striations going down its neck, trunk, and tail. They are on the legs more subtly. The skin would have been scaly but the tiny scales of a hadrosaur would not be too visible at this scale anyways. Lambeosaurines also had a series of larger scales on the ventral side of the base of the tail, but even these would probably be too small to sculpt. There should be a bumpy ridge running down the length of the back as well. The most conspicuous inaccuracy of this figure is in the skull. A newly-described specimen of a baby Parasaurolophus is known to have had a crest not unlike that of a Hypacrosaurus which would have later grown into the characteristic crest of the adult parasaurolophus. Safari’s Hypacrosaurus Baby, while not perfect, would actually work better as a baby Parasaurolophus than this one.

The Wild Safari Parasaurolophus baby, despite its inaccuracies, is still a classic figure to those who (like me) grew up with the old Wild Safari line. It does go well with the adult as well as the other baby dinosaurs from the earlier years of WS. It sometimes makes its way onto eBay, but can also occasionally be found in stores with old stock and is more common (from my experience) than the adult. I happened to find three of mine at an old toy store for the great sum of seventy-five cents. Despite Parasaurolophus‘ popularity, there are not as many good figures of it as one might expect, almost none which are completely up-to-date, and very few baby dinosaurs in general.

Shantungosaurus (Age of the Dinosaurs by PNSO)

Review and photographs by Fembrogon, edited by Suspsy

Hello, all, this is Fembrogon with my first review for the DinoToyBlog. My featured creature for this review is the gargantuan hadrosaur Shantungosaurus–a genus which I believe could achieve minor stardom in the mainstream with the right push. Shantungosaurus obviously wasn’t a carnivore, and didn’t have fancy ornamentation like some of its relatives, but with size estimates reaching up to 50 feet long and 13 tons heavy, Shantungosaurus holds the record for largest known non-sauropod land animal in history. That’s not bad for a duckbill!

Of course, with size being Shantungosaurus‘s potential claim to fame, the best way to market it would be to bank on BIG merchandise. The Chinese company PNSO finally took a stab at this dino, as well as several others (some of which have already been reviewed here on the blog), as part of a large hollow plastic toy line. How well does Shantungosaurus hold up?

Unfortunately, not so well in the case of my particular figure. The feet are so unevenly balanced that the big hadrosaur is prone to falling like dying prey. Hot water treatments to the legs have only offered temporary respites. Hopefully, this issue is unique to mine (I don’t even know if it’s actually a sculpting or shipping issue), but it’s the biggest criticism I have to lay on the figure, so let that issue . . um . . . Stand at the front.

The above problem notwithstanding, the PNSO Shantungosaurus has an impressive shelf presence, standing 6.5″ tall at the hip and 13″ long, 17″ counting the curves in the neck and tail. This puts the figure at roughly 1:35 scale. I’m no expert on hadrosaur anatomy, but looking at skeletal photographs and illustrations, PNSO seems to have nailed the overall proportions and features of the genus. I particularly like the thick, rectangular lower jaw replicated on the figure, which distinguishes it more from other, more “plain”-looking hadrosaurs (if the honking great size wasn’t enough for you). I don’t know if Shantungosaurus could bend the end of its tail as well as it is on this figure (hadrosaurs are thought to have very stiff, reinforced tailbones), but it certainly adds to a dynamic pose not often seen in herbivorous dinosaurs.


Finer details are very good for what is ostensibly a child’s toy. There’s little or no shrink-wrapping I can make out, besides a rather bony face. The body is covered with fine scaly detail, pronounced by dark paint highlights. The paint job is very earthy and natural in appearance, with light and dark brown washes and a nice, subtle striping on the tail. There are some odd rusty red highlights on the face, but they aren’t too distracting. My figure does have a few tiny scuffs on the toes and spine, however, so I would recommend treating this figure gently. There is also a noticeable paint blotch on the left back leg of mine; hopefully that is another flaw unique to my own.

PNSO appears to be off to a strong start with their dinosaur figures. While I can’t praise this particular one as much as I’d like, what with the various issues mine has (getting it to stand risks becoming a hassle), the PNSO Shantungosaurus is nonetheless a very nice representation of a genus rarely seen in toy form. If you’d like to obtain one for yourself, DeJankins still has this figure and others in the line for reasonable prices as of this writing.