Category Archives: non-dinosaur

Dilophosaurus Rex (Jurassic World Hybrids by Hasbro)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

When you read the title of this review, what do you expect to see? If you’re expecting some sort of new species of Dilophosaurus, then you’re giving the minds at Hasbro way too much credit. In reality, it’s a retool of their Bashers and Biters T. rex with a pair of crests and a frill. Honestly, I have nothing against the design of this toy, but to see Hasbro name it with an already established genus name is a little disheartening when 80% of the model does not look like a Dilophosaurus at all. Frankly, I thought the Stegoceratops and Carnoraptor had more original names then this when compared to their designs. I guess “Tyrannolophosaurus” or “Dilophotyrannus” did not have the same ring to it, or the designers were just too lazy to think of a more original name. So they just went with “Dilophosaurus rex,” thus fooling little kids who may not yet be as knowledgeable about dinosaurs as we older folks are.


Since this is another JW Hybrid made from Hasbro, you can expect to find screw holes, bright colours, and a sensitive gimmick function that is operated by the tail. As a retool, this model is basically the same as the old version, only with a new head sculpt. One improvement is that the head is an awful lot better now; it is actually symmetrical, has longer teeth, and the jaws can close evenly. It really is a lot better than the original’s—if only it did not have crests and a frill. To operate the gimmick, you push the tail down to raise the head in the air, and pull it to the side to makes the jaws open.


In terms of detailing, there is not much to talk about due to the cheap nature of the toy. There are some large scales on the thighs and the rest of the body is covered in wrinkles, but that’s about it. The toy is around nine inches long (give or take) which might make it about 1:50 scale, which is not very common in the world of dinosaur toys.

​The colours on this toy are so bright that I cannot get them to appear correctly on my camera, and I lack the tools to get ideal lighting (it’s too cold for me to get outdoor shots at present). The toy is made out of bright orange plastic, and its back is washed over with a shiny gold paint and black stripes. This all gives this figure a tiger-like vibe, which I’m sure is what the intention was. There are also black stripes painted along the head, and and another two painted along the outside of the crests. The teeth and claws are white. The eyes are yellow and the frill is painted in the same golden colour that adorns the back. Gold also covers the entire bottom half of the figure.

Overall, this is another review done for the DTB for the purpose of completing the Jurassic World section. Like all the other Hybrids, you can only find it at select stores like Target and Walgreens. If you’re a diehard collector of JP toys and merchandise, then this would be a no-brainer, but for those of us who want real dinosaur toys, there are plenty(and I mean PLENTY) of superior options on the market. And if you really want a hybrid dino, then I suggest seeking out some of the original JP Chaos Effect toys, as they were constructed a lot better than this.

Ammonoid (Paleozoic Pals by Jaag Plush)

First off, just to get it out of the way, this is not an ammonite. This is an ammonoid, the broader group to which ammonites belong. While ammonites lived through the Jurassic and Cretaceous the group ammonoidea first appeared 400 million years ago in the Devonian. Thus, here we have a plush ammonoid, not an ammonite which would have no place in a line of toys representing Paleozoic fauna. Also worth noting, for no reason in particular is that ammonoids are actually more closely related to squids, octopuses, and cuttlefish than they are to the superficially similar nautiloids but all of them are of course cephalopods.

Now what species or genus of ammonoid this toy is supposed to represent is a bit of a mystery, and it’s probably not meant to represent any specific animal, just ammonoids as a group and you could probably pretend it was an ammonite if you wanted. Just for kicks I tried to identify it in my “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York” but with no real success. This is kind of a shame honestly because the previously released trilobite and eurypterid identify the toys at the species level.

Regardless of identity this is still a great toy. The boldly colored and tightly wound orange shell, in conjunction with the big shiny eyes and ten arms make it a lot of fun to look at and play with. It’s quite large too, measuring 15” in length (arms included) and 7” tall. The shell is quite wide too, 3” across. The eyes are brown, body tan, and the arms tan and white. No mouth is present hidden in the arms, unfortunately.

As with the rest of the Paleozoic Pals line this toy was commissioned by PRI’s Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, NY. If you want to catch one in the wild you’ll have to go there to get one but you can also acquire it on their website which is no doubt the more practical route. But, if you’re ever in central/western New York make sure you stop by the museum. The collection of Devonian fossils is truly impressive and one of a kind. This review concludes our look at the Paleozoic Pals, for now. It’ll be exciting to see what the future holds for these adorable and unique toys.

Edaphosaurus (Fèves)


Over eight (!) years after reviewing Bullyland Edaphosaurus here, which was my very first review, I´d like to do a review my second Edaphosaurus now, the one, well, “by”, Féves.
Fèves is no company but the term for tiny little figurines made from ceramic / porcelain. It´s a collector´s world on its own, extending over hundreds of different subject areas such as birds, dwarf, movie heroes and so on. It´s worth browsing the web for further information, since there are many things to learn about by digging deeper into this matter. The origin of these figures is especially exciting: A popular fairy-tale figure named „Peau d´Ane“, (“Donkey Skin” in English) from the 13th century was said to have lost a ring in his cake mixture during baking.

Hence developed the rite of stirring a hard bean, French “Fève” into the traditional cake the French bake on January 6th, the day of Epiphany. Since people need change they developed other items from different materials to stir into the cake, still calling them “Féves”. Porcelain is heat-resistant and mostly was the material of choice. It´s said to bring luck if you are the one getting the piece of cake with the “bean” in it or even biting on it.
As to our concern, it´s important that some of these Fèves represent prehistoric animals, there are at least two series I know of, one I own myself (see picture) and one basing on the caracters from Disneys “Dinosaurs” movie.
As an example I decided on the Edaphosaurus, the interesting Permian plant-eater that belongs at least to the extended circle of popular prehistoric beasts, not as popular as its carnivorous cousin Dimetrodon, of course, but okay, still popular.

The figure is tiny, that is 3 cm long and 2 cm tall. It´s made from glossy porcelain. The animal itself stands on a green base revealing its name. While the figure is tan, its sail is bright red. This lovely critter is surprisingly detailed, albeit it would not stand the test of scientific correctness. All the things concerning scientific correctness in my opinion are not interesting for virtus like these.
If you are a collector who is not loath against quirky subject areas, you will enjoy Fèves figurines. Somehow or other, this Edaphosaurus is a nugget I want to keep as long as I´ll be collecting. Thus to my mind 5 out of 5 stars are totally justified.