Category Archives: pterosaur

Dimorphodon (Supreme by CollectA)

In early 2015, CollectA released one of the biggest and best pterosaur toys of all time: the Supreme-class Guidraco! With its great size, fearsome appearance, and magnificent detailing, it was a must-have for any pterosaur aficionado! For 2017, CollectA has followed up with a Dimorphodon at the same scale.

Like the Guidraco, the Dimorphodon has been sculpted in a walking pose with its wings neatly folded up. Its huge head is turned sightly to the right and its long tail is raised high and swaying slightly to the left. This gives the toy a length of 37 cm and a height of 13 cm. Granted, it’s not as enormous as the Guidraco, but it’s still one of the biggest pterosaur toys ever made. And it easily dwarfs the other renditions of Dimorphodon, at least that I know of!


The main colour on this pterosaur is sandy yellow. Dull brown wash is used to accentuate the shaggy coat of pycnofibres covered its entire body save for the bill, hands, feet, and tail vane. The various wing membranes are all taupe grey. The underbelly is beige and the claws are black. Dark brown is used for the markings on the head, the spots on the body, and the stripes on the tail. The nostrils are black, the inside of the mouth is dull pink, and the teeth are grey. Finally, the large, round eyes are painted with glossy black that I can even see my blurry reflection in. It’s a pretty swell colour scheme overall, although I would have preferred the teeth in white rather than grey.

As mentioned above, most of the Dimorphodon‘s body is covered in meticulously sculpted pycnofibres. The wings membranes have faint creases to give them a leathery appearance and the feet, the hands, and the enormous bill also have faint wrinkles. The inside of the mouth is nicely detailed with a long, skinny tongue and the teeth and claws are pleasingly pointy. And just like the Guidraco, this Dimorphodon boasts a hinged lower jaw that allows you the options of an open or closed mouth. The large front teeth interlock nicely. In contrast to its exaggerated portrayal in Jurassic World (ugh), Dimorphodon was a rather poor flyer with a light, fragile skull and a relatively weak bite. You’d pose overwhelmingly more danger to it than vice versa. That said, it still would have been the personification of death for any insect or small vertebrate inhabiting the Early Jurassic.

On that note, this Dimorphodon does have a dentition error in that there ought to be ten large teeth at the front of the lower jaw as opposed to just six. As well, the elongated fifth digits on the hind feet should not have claws. Aside from that, however, this figure is very accurate indeed. The proportions and profile are correct and the the figure is immediately recognizable as a Dimorphodon. The fenestrae are slightly visible beneath the skin, but not enough to be a case of “shrink wrapping.” The propatagium and the brachopatagium also appear to be correct, with the latter attaching to the hind limb near the ankle. The uropatagium stretches from the base of the tail to the elongated fifth toes. The tip of the tail features a large vane for stability during flight.


A couple of small errors notwithstanding, this toy truly is fantastic, every bit as much as the Guidraco and hands down the best plastic representation of Dimorphodon to date. Definitely a top contender for the best prehistoric toy of 2017!

A huge thank you to CollectA for this review sample!

Pteranodon (Deluxe by CollectA)

Review and photographs by Cloud the Dinosaur King, edited by Suspsy

For my first review on the Dinosaur Toy Blog, I will be covering a somewhat underrated figure: the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon.

Facts about this creature: Pteranodon, which means “toothless wing” is a genus of pteradactyloid pterosaur that lived in what is now the central United States during the Late Cretaceous period about 86 to 84.5 million years ago. It had a wingspan of 20 feet and weighed about 25 pounds. Pteranodon is probably one of the most iconic pterosaurs, the “Pterodactyl” of our childhood. Males had a huge crest behind their heads, while females had a crest about 1/3 of that size. They flew above the Western Interior Sea over giant mosasaurs and plesiosaurs. And now, without further ado, let’s get into the review.

At first glance: In my opinion, this is a pretty good figure at first glance and I think it’s superior to the older CollectA Pteranodon. I think the crest is a lot better, more flattened as opposed to carrot-shaped. But let’s take a closer look at this figure. First of all, this is not in 1:40 scale as it is advertised. If you get the box with it, the little information card says Pteranodon had a wingspan of 40 feet, but it really had a wingspan of only 20 feet, which puts this figure at about 1:20 scale. The wingspan is about 30 cm.

Scientific accuracy: This figure isn’t the most accurate Pteranodon figure. For one thing, it only has pycnofibers on its chest and throat. A real Pteranodon probably had them elsewhere on its body, not just in one confined area. The wings are the correct length, but they should not be as pointy as they are; they should be much more rounded. Also, there should be a steep drop in the wing membrane about 3/4 of the way towards the main body. As well, there are three joints to the wing finger instead of four. I also don’t like how transparent the wings are. The legs are folded up under the body and are too large. It also has five toes on each foot as opposed to four, and they are also longer than they are supposed to be. The tail appears to be too thick, but it is the correct length. Finally, the beak is curved, but the lower jaw on mine (and of a lot of other people’s) is warped upwards.

Overall: I think this is a pretty cool figure. If you like big, fairly accurate pterosaurs, than this figure is for you. It’s not the most accurate Pteranodon figure out there, but it’s pretty good.

This has been my first review on the Dinosaur Toy Blog. I hope you all enjoy it and other reviews to come.

Pteranodon (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

It was once thought that there were two distinct species of the famous Pteranodon. P. longiceps is the “standard” one with a knife-shaped crest, while P. sternbergi was larger and had a more ornate, upright crest. However, a 2010 study concluded that P. sternbergi was distinct enough to be a distinct genus, Geosternbergia sternbergi.

This figure, released by Safari in 1999, is clearly a Geosternbergia, but I’ll refer to it as a Pteranodon, as that’s what it was intended to be at the time (Safari’s Tapejara figure has the same issue). At 8 cm in length and a maximum wingspan of 18 cm, it’s small compared to more recent pterosaur figures. The main colour is brownish-orange with light orange for the brachiopatagium, a greenish-yellow bill, and bright yellow eyes ringed in black.

This Pteranodon features the most important details of any pterosaur figure: wrinkled, leathery wings and a body covered in pycnofibres. The crest has the correct shape, but the bill could certainly stand to be longer. The feet and the first three fingers on each arm are little more than notches, and the extended fourth digits are ridiculously thick. On top of that, the head on mine is permanently warped to the right, and treating it to boiling water has not proved successful. If that were all there was to this toy, it’d be easy to write off.

But as you can see from the photos, this Pteranodon figure has poseable wings! Bendable rods inside the arms allow you to raise, lower, fold, expand, and tilt the wings to your content. Needless to say, this is quite a fun gimmick, one that I would have dearly loved fiddling with as a youngster. And I love fiddling with it now. Indeed, I think it would be great if Safari or CollectA or some other company revisited this gimmick.

And so, while the Safari Pteranodon (or Geosternbergia, if you prefer) isn’t going to win any awards for meticulous sculpting detail, it’s definitely one of the most fun pterosaur figures I’ve come across in my collecting. Recommended.