Category Archives: Recur

Spinosaurus (Small)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Today’s review is of the Recur Spinosaurus released back in 2015 (according to the year printed on the belly). As a modern take on the species, this model is a pretty decent replica, and a stark contrast to the Tyrannosaurus I recently reviewed from the same line.

​One thing that’s obvious is the fact that this toy was made with longer hind legs like most reconstructions prior to 2014. Despite this, it is sculpted with its arm acting as a third leg, just like the Papo Acrocanthosaurus. Unlike that toy, the arm on this one is propping it up high enough to give us the classic horizontal theropod impression, and it gives off a somewhat imposing look. In terms of accuracy, this model could be decent for a pre-2014 model if it were not for the head, which shows traces of the Spinosaurus that appeared in Jurassic Park 3. These include a head that is clearly too broad, a pair of crests, and the lack of a tooth notch. The other issues with this figure include the fact that the feet are too big and the legs are too long. Of course, there has been ongoing controversy over the the 2014 Ibrahim/Sereno reconstruction, so I’m willing to let this slide for now. One thing that I have to praise the toy for is the fact that Recur gave it the large fish hook claws that the spinosaurid family are known for. Though being a toy, the claws have blunted tips to prevent its target audience from getting hurt. Like all Recur toys, this Spinosaurus is made out of a soft and squishy PVC material and there is likely cotton inside of it. The only hard parts on this model are the arms, which are made out of a incredibly stiff plastic. Which is good, because if the arms were not this hard, the toy would have no way of standing, because the hind legs are very pliable.

​In terms of detail, the model is decked with wrinkles, but there are small osteoderms at the base of the sail that run up about halfway down the tail before they stop. Along the top of the tail, there are larger osteoderms than those found along the base of the sail, and almost look like they would be spiky if it were not for the fact that this was a toy made for kids. On the back of the neck, there is a set of completely different integument in the form of crocodile-like armour. Why Recur decided to do this is beyond me. Perhaps this was meant to go down the entire length of the back, but they scrapped it instead. It would not be the first time a company took the crocodilian look of spinosaurs to the extreme.

The colours on this toy are very dull at first glance, but if you look closely, you can see more variety. The majority of the Spinosaurus is painted in grey, but the armour on the neck is painted green and the tops of the neural spines alternate between green and blue, giving it a nice pattern when viewed in the right lighting. The teeth are painted in a dull white and the tongue and mouth interior are painted purple.

Overall, this makes for a excellent toy, but a only decent replica of Spinosaurus. It really was not made to be included among the likes of CollectA or Safari figures, and it is aimed at a much younger age group than most other toys we review on this blog. The soft materials make it ideal for very rough play should you (or your child) wish it to clash with other dinosaur toys. As of now, the only place you can find it at is DeJankins, which just got its replenishment orders in as of the time of this writing.

Tyrannosaurus rex (Original Version)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

In 2016, a new brand of toys came onto the dinosaur collecting scene, with a huge selection in their Ancient Animals line. Recur, and its parent company Ankyl Toys Co. Ltd., has been around for a while, but only recently have their products have been revealed to the public (presumably for the first time outside of China). What sets their products apart from the competition is the fact all of them are made out of flexible PVC plastic, and most are filled with a synthetic cotton. As of now, there are 41 toys to choose from, and some of them appear to be in different sub-lines, although Recur has not come out and say if this is true or not. For instance, most of their new products for 2017 are simply jumbo-sized versions of some of the dinosaurs they already released, but I don’t know if they have stated anywhere that these ones are part of a different group. There is also a massive difference in the style of how some of them are made. For instance, the Edmontonia is clearly cartoonish, but the Ankylosaurus they made for this year is a lot more realistic in appearance. Today’s review is another example of this strange contrast in style. What I have here today is what I like to call Recur’s monstrous version of Tyrannosaurus, which was sculpted in a tripod stance instead of having a horizontal pose like the one that was already reviewed.



As for accuracy, there’s nothing praiseworthy about this figure other than the fact that it has two tiny arms. But I’m finding it very hard to come up with the words to describe how inaccurate this T. rex is. For one thing, the skull is way too box-like and does not match up with that of the real animal at all. The skull even lacks the creature’s signature binocular vision, which is something that even collector oriented companies (*cough* Rebor *cough*) seem to forget on their figures. Another prominent issue I see with this figure is that it does not match up with the shape of the real T. rex. I cannot describe what’s wrong with it without writing for hours on end to explain it all, so I will simply say that the 2016 version is a vast improvement in terms of accuracy since it is not a tripod, and at least looks a little more like an actual T. rex than this one ever could.

After all that criticism, you might wonder why I chose to buy this T. rex over the newer one to purchase. Well truth be told, I like this version better. When I say this is the monstrous version, I mean it. The toy looks gnarly and ready to tear you to shreds. However, that is part of what I like about it. I realize not everyone is going to like this figure the way I do (if not at all). But it is clear to me that this toy was made for kids as opposed to adults. The T. rex is posed in a dynamic turning-to-the-side motion, which is up for interpretation. Maybe it’s about to get charged by a Triceratops, and it dodged the hit? Who knows, and that’s what I like about this toy. The materials may not be up to Papo standards, but the detailing and colour choices make it seem like a living creature to me. Of course, the realism is diminished greatly once you get to the blunted teeth, but one must remember that this product was made for kids first and foremost. Not older collectors like us. That being said, it’s time to discuss the colouration of this toy. The model is simply dark, swampy green with an even dirtier swampy green on the bottom. The claws are your typical black and the teeth are white. Inside the mouth, you will find a shade of dark pink, and the eyes are orange. It stands 13.5 cm tall and measures 20.5 cm long.

Overall, I can’t say I recommend this to collectors. But as a kids’ toy, it could work perfectly as long as you don’t use it in an educational context that declares it to be an accurate model. As of now the only place I recommend buying it from is www.dejankins.com, as their prices are often fair, and it carries the entire line as of today. However, the supply of most of them is extremely limited, so if you want one, contact DeJankins now before they’re sold out.

Edmontonia (Recur)

The last of the review samples sent to me by Recur is their 2015 rendition of the heavily armoured nodosaurid known as Edmontonia. Let’s see what this one has to offer, shall we?

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Like all Recur toys, this Edmontonia is quite large. It measure almost 18 cm long and is 10 cm tall due to the raised tail. The colour scheme is pretty standard for an ankylosaur toy: golden brown on top and pale yellow on the bottom. The spikes and osteoderms are beige with dark grey wash, the hooves are dark brown, the mouth is dirty pink, and the nostrils are black. The eyes are rather weird, as they’re coloured half red and half light blue. I don’t know, maybe this Edmontonia is torn between being good and being evil.

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Regardless of its affiliation, this animal is clearly poised for battle, with its limbs planted, its head turned to the left, and its tail raised high, ready to deal a blow to whatever set of jaws comes too close. As far as ankylosaurs are concerned, you can’t get much more dynamic than this. The limbs and underbelly are covered in faint scales and thick wrinkles. The top of the head is covered in small plates and the spikes and large osteoderms on the back and the plates running down the tail are grooved. To the casual eye, this certainly looks like a pretty cool and realistic ankylosaur. And as with all the other Recur products I’ve reviewed, the PVC makes it one tough cookie. I can literally put this toy down on a bare hardwood floor and step on it with all my 200 or so lbs, and it will simply pop back into form after. I would never dare to do that with anything from Battat, CollectA, Papo, or Safari!

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That being said, this Edmontonia is far from being scientifically accurate. First off, the head. The muzzle should be longer and narrower and there should not be small horns protruding from behind the orbits. And second, the armour. There are not enough spikes on the sides and not enough large osteoderms over the neck and shoulders. The many osteoderms covering the back are small and smooth when they should be larger and keeled. And while the three rows of plates covering the tail look intimidating, there should probably be lots more osteoderms as well. As well, the hind limbs are too long and there’s a large and unsightly seam line running right through them and the underside of the tail.

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Overall, this Edmontonia is representative of the Recur prehistoric line as a whole: visually impressive, very well-sculpted, and highly durable, but falling short in terms of accuracy. Hopefully this will change in years to come. As I noted in my very first Recur review, I think that this company has a great deal of potential and that they’re worth keeping an eye on. I’d like to thank them once again for sending me so many review samples, and I wish them the very best in their future.

Thanks also go out to Dr. Adam S. Smith!

Available from Recur’s AliExpress store

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