Category Archives: stegosaur

Stegosaurus (Smithsonian Institution by Tyco)

A Stegosaurus is definitely a classic,

as it hailed from the Jurassic.

It had large plates and spikes on its tail,

though it trudged as fast as a snail.

Meet the Smithsonian Stegosaurus toy from TYCO,

this is one toy you don’t want to let go.

The Dino Riders Stegosaurus had armor and could walk,

the Smithsonian version had none, just plates like a mohawk.

Finding room on a shelf might be a chore,

as its scale is 1:24.

At 6.5 in (16.5 cm) high and 10.8 in (27.4 cm) long,

it would look good standing next to King Kong.

The main color is green with red that has been brushed.

I guess this Stegosaur must be excited as it plates are blushed.

Oh those beaded eyes with their lifelike gleam,

wink at you as you start to dream.

Depictions of Dinosaurs from a childhood we adored

lead to scientific accuracy that we occasionally have ignored.

Its tail is dragging and its legs are splayed,

but its from the 80’s and that’s how it was made.

Yes this toy is quite archaic,

but for me Stegosaurus is Ptolemaic.

Its tiny little head had a beak that chops,

it looks as cute as an Avaceratops.

Long time gone from the shops it is,

so off to E-bay as that’s the biz.

To me its beautiful so I fully recommend,

as its worth the money you will spend.

Stegosaurus (Mini)(Skeleflex by Wild Planet)

Despite its immense fame and popularity, there are not very many complete specimens of Stegosaurus. Most of the skeletons you see in museums are actually composites of multiple animals. The most intact one is currently “Sophie,” a young adult that resides in the Natural History Museum in London, U.K. It is about 85% complete and looks magnificent. But as you’ll see, the subject of today’s review is quite the antithesis of “Sophie.”

The Skeleflex Mini Stegosaurus kit is made up of fourteen army green pieces. The main part of the skeleton is rubberized plastic; the rest are hard plastic. They all snap together via ball joints save for the peg-on thagomizer.

Once assembled, the Stegosaurus measures 16.5 cm long and stands 10 cm tall due to the large plates on its back. It holds together quite well and is articulated at the head, jaw, shoulders, hips, wrists, ankles, and tail. The sculpting is reasonably good and the plates in particular have an interesting bumpy texture to them.

But as you can clearly see from these photos, this Stegosaurus makes the T. rex I reviewed last time look like the very pinnacle of scientific accuracy by comparison. This is a hideous monster, plain and simple. Its head is oversized and equipped with sharp, triangular teeth. It has too few vertebrae. It has a single row of skinny, dagger-shaped plates. And most noticeably of all, it has ridiculously humongous feet. It’s anyone’s guess how a freak like this would be able to lift its feet high enough to walk.

Like all Skeleflex kits, the Stegosaurus‘ pieces can be swapped out to create any number of monstrous creatures. Although honestly, I find its default form plenty frightening already!

So that’s the Skeleflex Mini Stegosaurus for you. If you’re in the market for painstakingly detailed and accurate prehistoric renditions, then for goodness sakes, skip this kit and buy yourself a nice CollectA or Safari toy. But if you enjoy a little bit of weird fun now and then, look no further!

Stegosaurus (HG Toys)

Here is an interesting rendition of the popular, plate covered, thagomizer wielding stegosaurus.  HG toys made some interesting looking dinosaurs during the 80’s.   For inspiration on this stegosaur they must have looked at turn of the century paleoart.  They certainly didn’t reference any dinosaur renaissance ideas into this stegosaurus, as this toy looks squat and sluggish.  This guy could have leapt from the canvas of Heinrich Harder. The last time someone would have considered this toy scientific accurate, it would have been the 1920’s. Despite being outdated lets take a closer look at it and see what redeeming features it might have.

About the Toy:  It is a decent size toy at 11.50 in (29.21cm) long and 4.6 in (11.68 cm) high over the hips.  It is made of hollow plastic and despite being relatively light, it is a rather sturdy fellow.  The pose is straight and low.  The suspension on the guy is low with a clearance of just 0.25 in (3.9 cm).  A true low rider.  The legs are short with big feet, with three toes per foot.   Along the back there are twenty two plates arranged in parallel lines of eleven.  The body is rotund and well fed.  The tail is rather short and is slung low to the ground ending with four spikes.  There is some texturing with the skin folds rippling along the body and etched lines on the plates  The main paint job is sweet potato orange with a secondary color of dark brown along the back, plates, the underside, and brushed along the legs.

This toy does have some articulation.  The front legs do not move backward, but when pushed forward to the front they can move to about 100 degrees. The back legs  are the opposite as they do not move forward, but they do move backwards to about 95 degrees.  Due to the low body, the fact the legs move is sort of pointless unless you want it to slide on its belly like Frosty the Snowman.  There is also an action feature, push the button on the head and the mouth opens.  The mouth does not open very wide though.  The head can twist all the way around exorcist style.  The tail by the spikes can also turn all the way around so you can get those pesky predators.

Overall:  It is a “Classic” sand box toy.  Yes it does have some retro styling which might give it some curb appeal but this toy is not heading to most peoples shelves.  In fact, most people would find it a rather unattractive fellow.  Obviously it has very little use as an educational tool.  Unless you love Stegosaurus (which I do), into retro styling, or have a sandbox and in need of a toy for a family member, I would pass on this toy.  If you are interested in this toy, it has been out of circulation since the 80’s, but does show up occasionally in neighborhood garage sales, thrift stores, and on E-Bay.