Category Archives: thyreophoran

Ankylosaurus (Mini)(Chap Mei)

The various Ankylosaurus toys that have been reviewed here on the DTB over the years range from the truly superb to the decidedly subpar. But the one I’ve got to review today may well be the most hideous of them all.

This here is the Mini Ankylosaurus from Chap Mei. It measures about 10.5 cm long and is 6.5 cm high at the tip of its raised tail club. The main colours are olive green and dark grey with white accents on the osteoderms and red accents on the club. A splash of black is on top of the head and the teeth and mouth are white and red respectively. The eyes are supposed to be yellow, but the left one on mine has not been painted. The claws are also unpainted, but as with all Chap Mei toys, that’s an intentional corner-cutter.

The skin textures on this Ankylosaurus range from large scales on the head to wrinkles on the underbelly and legs to pebbles on the back and tail and grooves on the osteoderms. The animal is sculpted in a defensive stance with its right front limb forward, its head turned to the left, and its tail raised high. While this is unquestionably a dramatic pose, it’s impossible for any ankylosaurid to achieve without breaking some of the vertebrae in its tail.

Which brings us to the issue of accuracy, or woeful lack of it. The limbs are too long for an Ankylosaurus, although the feet surprisingly have the proper number of toes. The armour is way too spiky. And ye gods, that head. That ridiculous head. Just look at that long muzzle, those sharp teeth, and the fact that there are no horns projecting out from behind the orbits. It looks like a rauisuchid head attached to a generic ankylosaur’s body!

This is one of those toys that is arguably so lame, it’s funny. Unless you’re fond of oddities (which is perfectly cool), you can definitely give this Ankylosaurus toy a pass.

Gigantspinosaurus (CollectA)

It’s no secret that the stegosauria were an odd bunch of dinosaurs, one that we perhaps take for granted given the popularity of one genus in particular; Stegosaurus. But Stegosaurus is but one of many, and for whatever reason the other genera of this unique clade have never gained in popularity like the admittedly charismatic Stegosaurus.

In typical CollectA fashion we’ve recently been introduced to many of the other interesting genera in the stegosauria. The most recently introduced of these obscure dinosaurs is the appropriately named Gigantspinosaurus. No, it’s not a new hybrid for “Jurassic World”, nor is in a super-ultra-mega version of Spinosaurus. It’s a stegosaur from late Jurassic China and with its unique combo of plates and spikes and the perfect choice for expanding your stegosaur collection.

Gigantspinosaurus is not a genus I was too familiar with before acquiring the CollectA toy. Superficially it looks a lot like Kentrosaurus, that other popular stegosaur. A new dinosaur by scientific standards the Gigantspinosaurus wasn’t described until 1992 and generally ignored until a 2006 paper on the genus.

Gigantspinosaurus possessed a number of characteristics that make it quite distinctive, not least of which are the enormous spikes coming out from its shoulders. These spikes protrude upwards and point back, unlike the similar spikes on Kentrosaurus. CollectA faithfully recreates this feature as well as the other anatomical features of this animal. Like most stegosaurs (aside from Stegosaurus) the plates on Gigantspinosaurus were fairly small and triangular. The thagomizer at the end of the tail possesses four spikes. Skin impressions from this animal show a series of raised scutes that are also reproduced here. Basically, CollectA did their homework on this one, and it shows. The slightly enlarged head (for a stegosaur) is also in keeping with what we know about this dinosaur.

Although the model only measures a mere 5.4” it is packed with a high level of detail. Three clawed and two vestigial digits can be seen clearly on the robust forelimbs. The hind limbs possess three forward facing toes and one small dewclaw on each foot. Folds of skin run down the flanks and tail along a muscular and athletic looking body. The toy is sculpted in an alert posture with the right forelimb stepping forward and the head looking towards the right. The tail is swinging slightly upwards and towards the left.

The paint scheme is particularly nice on this one, and a far cry from the war-paint that CollectA used to be so fond of. This dinosaur is painted in soft, mottled earth tones. It’s both eye-catching and believable without being gaudy. The plates and shoulder spikes are gray with red tips highlighting the spikes. The thagomizer spikes are painted brown. Although the nails are clearly sculpted on this toy they are still painted in the same sandy color as the toy’s base color. The scutes on the body are painted in a variety of colors but I think they’re all supposed to be gray like the plates. But those on the brown portions of the animal are brown and there are a few on mine that aren’t painted at all. Given the small size there are also quite a few mistakes in the paint application. It’s barely noticeable though and shouldn’t put you off from an otherwise fantastic little piece.

Overall this is a really interesting, well made, and affordable little toy and a must have in any collection. Being new for 2017 it shouldn’t be hard to track one down. In closing I would like to thank Suspsy, a fellow reviewer, for donating this model to me for review.

Stegosaurus (Version 1)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

When it comes to dinosaur toy lines, Stegosaurus is almost always a necessity. So when Recur first created their line of soft toys for kids, they were sure to include the plated lizard. There are currently two different versions to choose from and today I will be reviewing the first one, made back in 2015.



This Stegosaurus is sculpted in an interesting stance, with its hind legs planted firmly on the ground and one of its front feet slightly raised up. Unfortunately, this pose is not an original idea, as one glance at this image from the Jurassic World website should be enough to show you where the inspiration came from. Indeed, one can argue that Jurassic World has been a major influence in the creation of a few of their models. It’s similar to how the films influenced Papo’s models as well.



In terms of accuracy, this model is not going to win any awards. The feet are all elephantine and the plates are too small. Other issues include the fact that there’s too much space in the middle of the back, and that the thagomizer spikes are pointed out to the sides when they should be pointed backwards. Finally, the head is too big and lacks the animal’s signature throat armour.

So how well does this Stegosaurus stand up to being a toy? Well, like all Recur models, it is made out of a soft PVC plastic filled with cotton on the inside. It can clearly be bashed around while still retaining its shape. I know this because I actually had this toy inside a tote with other ones made out of a harder material, and the only parts that were damaged on it was the paint on the face and plates. Speaking of the paint, the colours are a assortment of different shades of green (that I will have a hard time describing to you), while the beak and claws are painted black.

At around 11 and a half inches, this dinosaur is way too big to be in 1:40 Scale, but like all Recur items, it was designed to be a toy first and foremost, made to withstand the toughest play possible while still retaining its shape, and keeping kids safe from getting their eyes poked out. That being said, if you’re a stickler for accuracy, then it’s best to wait for a model that matches that of Scott Hartman’s current skeletal diagram. But if you’re a collector of stegosaurs or just want a nice, safe, and durable toy for your child, then this is a must-have. Right now, you can buy it at DeJankins, who just got their Recur stock replenished due to high demand, and Amazon.com.