Category Archives: thyreophoran

Stegosaurus (Deluxe by CollectA)

Review and Photographs by Quentin Brendel (aka Pachyrhinosaurus), edited by Suspsy

The Deluxe Stegosaurus was the first of the few CollectA dinosaurs to enter my collection and it’s still one of my favourite. It originally attracted my attention since it was the only figure out at the time that had exactly seventeen plates, laterally-pointed thagomizer spikes, and throat armour. Ironically it appears as though the former two are no longer considered correct now, but I was impressed at the time.

In length, this figure measures 9.5″ long straight from snout to tail. Without doing the math, this looks like 1:40 scale to me (since 1 inch = approx. 1 metre), which is the standard scale for most dinosaur figures. The Stegosaurus is in a slow walking pose with its head tilted to the right and its mouth open, perhaps calling to another dinosaur or letting out a passive bellow. The angle of the head and curvature of the neck work well with the dermal armor, almost as though it’s showing off to the other figures which lack this feature. The tail is slung high and stiffly held so that the dorsal surface is nearly level with the body. As noted earlier, this figure’s back is adorned with no less than seventeen bony plates from neck to tail. These are amber in colour with black airbrushing. The body is gray, with the high areas leaning towards blue-green. This darkens at the top to the colour of the lower areas. The underside is white, once again airbrushed. The white continues down the interior of the legs where the claws appear to be the same colour as the darker parts of the body. The mouth interior is a solid light pink and the eyes have a touch of the amber colour of the plates.

The skin is textured with individual scales defined in the model as well as a series of small bumps on the darker areas near the plates. There are markings on the thagomizer spikes which look like they were meant to be scales, though in four years of owning this figure it took me until now to notice them. In addition, there are very reptilian-looking ripples on the underside of the body and tail, as well as the legs.

The CollectA Stegosaurus was put out a few years before the “Sophie” specimen was published and so doesn’t reflect the most recent understanding of the animal. According to the new fossils, Stegosaurus should have a longer neck and a lower-hung tail than in the figure. It’s thought that the very end of the tail where the thagomizer is should be pointed downwards. The torso of this figure has a longer relative length, which is more of a trend in newer models. Also due to recent finds, it is now known that Stegosaurus had nineteen dorsal plates instead of the more traditional seventeen. The hands have five digits, each with a claw. If I remember correctly, only the innermost two digits should have claws. I believe the feet are correct with three on each.

Overall, this could very well be the best Stegosaurus on the market for accuracy. There tends to be a lack of accurate figures of more popular species since most companies put them out first, and don’t often replace them once they’ve improved. The CollectA Stegosaurus is stamped 2009 and is still in production, as well as a smaller version and even a carcass which are painted to match this one. You can easily find it on eBay here and Amazon here .

Dinosaur Boxset 2 (Toyway)

Review and photos by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy

We’ve all seen them. The crude dinosaur toys that you get in small museum shops for extremely cheap prices, normally just bought by parents to keep their children quiet for a while. The last thing you’d expect is to put six of these together and sell them as a box set. Yet that is what Toyway did. Granted, their wildlife sets are extremely well made and varied. Their dinosaur models, on the other hand, are more . . . Chinasaur. Do any of these toys shine in spite of this? Well, let’s see . . .

First is this odd green and yellow quadruped. You’d be forgiven for thinking it was an early ankylosaur with inaccurate teeth. At 5.1” long and 2” high, it looks like a small herbivore. But then I looked up what it was I was quite surprised. This is meant to be a Postosuchus!!! It is too wide, the head is all wrong, and the front legs are much too long! This dreadful figure really is the worst of the set.

Next is a small ornithopod, Camptosaurus. Another small figure, 3.5” long and 2.2” high, it stands out with its dynamic, sweeping pose. The problem is that it can bend out of shape, causing stability issues. The colour is quite subdued: muddy brown and dark greens, good for a herbivore that wishes to stay camouflaged. The main issues are that it is a bit thick in certain areas, like the neck, and the front limbs are too long. A mixed bag.

The hadrosaur in this set is Corythosaurus, a classic. Posed in a strange quadrupedal stance, it certainly looks retro, very lizard-like, though with a rather unnatural dip in the neck. The subdued colours from the Camptosaurus return, but with lilac instead of green, and a garish lime green underbelly. At 4.5” long and 2.4” high, it would suit for a youngster among its kind.

Now, for even more retro, it’s Iguanodon. Between the upright stance and iguana-like head, it will certainly appeal to fans of older dino designs. With a light red colour, it certainly stands out, though. At 3.5” high and 3.9” long, it is one of the bigger figures in this mini set.

Euoplocephalus is the ankylosaur of the set, and one of the best in the bunch. It has the traditional stance of defending itself from a predator, pulling it off quite well. Its brown and turquoise colouring is odd, as is the club design, which is too spaced out. The body is too thin as well, and not squat enough. Again, good for a juvenile at 4.5” long and 2” high.

The final member of the set is the biggest surprise: Placerias, a dicynodont from the Triassic. This figure is well made and really accurate, and it’s hard to find anything to say against it. The green and beige colours work well here and, though the pose is a bit stoic, it still sticks out. At 4.3” long and 2” high, it certainly works as a small reptile among its contemporaries.

Now, here is the final twist. As most of these are cheap, small figures from museum shops, few tend to put these on eBay, except rarely in sets with other figures. As a result, outside this set, they’re surprisingly rare, especially for the Placerias, as it is one of only a few representations of this figure. And the price for it can range from £8.00 to £64.00! If you can find it cheap, it would be worth it, otherwise I can’t strongly recommend it too highly.

Stegosaurus (Wendy’s Exclusive from Definitely Dinosaurs by Playskool)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

For my second Definitely Dinosaurs soft model review, I will be tackling their rendition of Stegosaurus. Right off the bat, this model is downright cute, and it is clear it was made for toddlers because of the bright colours and the hard vinyl plastic it is made off. As with the Ceratosaurus(and every other model I will get to in the line), this model is not made to be taken seriously, as it is clearly for the youngest of children. However, they did managed to get one thing right with this figure: ending the mouth with a beak.

The two colours this model is painted in are teal and bright purple, while the eyes are painted yellow. The plates are all too small to be realistic for an adult, so I’m assuming that this model is made to represent a juvenile. There are also way too many plates on its back to be considered accurate. Instead of 17, there are over 21 plates, not counting the thagomizer. The thagomizer spikes are also way too short to be effective against the mean old Ceratosaurus, whom I see as more of a bully then a hungry animal. The model is made as if it were a heavyset animal, with his thighs up just beneath the plates. This forces his front legs to sprawl out to the sides, and one of them is outstretched so that he can achieve his pose. The feet on this model are nowhere near being as accurate as say, the feet on the Battat Stegosaurus released in the same Decade. But they are not your usual elephant feet either. Instead, they look like blunted claws that stick out of the animal’s feet.

Really, this is not a toy that needs to be scrutinized for accuracy, but I thought it would make this review more interesting if I did anyways. It’s very hard to criticize this figure, as it is still apparent that it was not made for adults. But I’m sure that this little guy will forgive me as he knows I’m just writing a review for him on a blog that scrutinizes dinosaur toys. As always, the only way to get this figure is through eBay, and understand that you may have to settle for one with a duller color scheme than this, as mine was one of the latest releases of these toys.