Category Archives: unknown company

Allosaurus (Unknown Company)

Review and photos by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

My favourite dinosaur has been Allosaurus for many years. Recently I found this figure on eBay and when she came in the mail, she was bigger and prettier than I had imagined. That was when I knew I had to do a review. I searched high and low for a manufacturer name somewhere on the figure, and tried looking on the Internet, but all in vain. Still, though, I think this is a great figure that rivals even the name brand models like Schleich and Safari, so in spite of being unable to locate the manufacturer, I am going to go ahead and do a review of this pretty figure.

This figure got a number of things correct that many generic dinosaurs often make mistakes on. For example, I have seen Allosaurus figures that show the dinosaur with two fingers or even five. This one accurately possesses three fingers on each hand. It does not have one finger longer than the other two, unfortunately. It is also incredibly durable, something that I unfortunately can’t always say for Safari dinosaurs. I only had their Dilophosaurus one day before the arm popped off. The dinosaur is hollow, so it can be squeezed a little, but the plastic is nice and strong. There are no spindly pieces that can break off.The neck is nice and long, too, like an Allosaurus‘ neck should be. Often times the neck is too short in a number of other Allosaurus models, more like the neck of a Tyrannosaurus. The throat has something like a fan along its underside. The feet are a good size and are not oversized as they often are in some dinosaur figures. The colouring is interesting too; this figure reminds me of a reconstruction of Allosaurus that was popular when I was a kid.

The figure is tan with dark brown accenting on the top of the body and head, and a light green underbelly. The eyes are red with black pupils. I would like to point out that this figure is probably a female Allosaurus, as the ridges over the eyes are more rounded and less like horns. The figure also features lips around the teeth, which was a nice innovative touch for a figure that isn’t terribly new. The jaws are fused between the teeth, which lends some extra durability to the head. The nostrils and earholes are present. The figure does have a tripod pose, but that helps it to have a stable stance even if it isn’t perfectly accurate.


In short, this is a great Allosaurus, even though it’s not perfect. This figure is not expensive at all and is relatively easy to find on eBay. I got mine for $7.

Pinacosaurus (Unknown Company)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Today’s figure was bought at a Mexican Fiesta back in 2014. It is from the same unknown line as this T. rex reviewed back in 2011, and it is a pretty sizable piece of plastic. At first glance, it is apparent that they intended to make a generic Ankylosaurus modelled after Euoplocephalus, but it has the name Pinacosaurus stamped in all caps along with “Made in China” on its belly. Throughout this review I will be treating this model as if it’s a replica of Pinacosaurus because that is the name that was printed on it (though there are some websites that list it as an Ankylosaurus instead).

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Pinacosaurus was an ankylosaur that lived in Mongolia during the Late Cretaceous period, and it was a close relative of other spiky Asian dinosaurs such as Saichania and Tarchia. It is known from a decent amount of remains, and there are even nests full of babies that may represent the youngest of this species. When it comes to collectibles and toys of this creature, only two come to mind, and neither are not collector quality. The first is a common one made by Boley(which can be found at Wal-Mart). And the second is this one here whose company name I am unsure of. All I know is that this big toy is often associated with the T. rex I mentioned earlier, and if you go to the DTB Amazon Store, you will find a page called Great Dinos By Great Dinos where it is listed as a Ankylosaurus(and is currently unavailable).

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When it comes to first impressions, one must know that this is a BIG toy made more for the sandbox than someone’s shelf. Despite this, an awful lot of detail has been packed into the sculpting of this figure. The back and legs are completely covered in scales and wrinkles while large spikes make up the armour. The pattern of the spikes make the model look like it was based off the Euoplocephalus mount at the London Museum of Natural History, (which would actually make this model a Scolosaurus instead of Euoplocephalus.) With that in mind, the armour is completely wrong to be a Pinacosaurus or an Ankylosaurus like the website says. The head is nothing special: just a generic ankylosaur head with its mouth wide open to show off its blunt teeth, and there is no added sheen in the mouth to make it look more realistic.

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The toy is roughly around 16 inches long and cost me around $20 to obtain. Considering the fact that I bought this guy at a game booth that was trying to use it as a prize, I imagine that I may have spent a little more then I needed to. When I walked around the Fiesta with this model in hand, everyone was amazed because they thought I had actually won it, when in reality I spent the rest of my money on it just so I could have something that I knew I would enjoy from that event.

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As I said earlier in the review, this toy was made more for the sand box than someone’s shelf. And it is not really accurate for Pinacosaurus or Ankylosaurus. However, the detailing on it is great, and if given to the right hands, it can be repainted to look like something that is on par with Papo or dare I say, Rebor. The colours that the company painted it in are blander than the old Replicasaurus model made by Schleich, The whole top half of the figure is mud-coloured and the whole bottom half is light brown. The only other colours on this figure are red for the eyes and tongue and white for the teeth.

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In the end, I can’t recommend this for anyone who is into serious reconstructions, but if you absolutely need a dinosaur model that’s labelled Pinacosaurus, then this is the best one available until someone makes one that is more accurate.

Thyreophoran (Furkan?)

Review and photos by Lanthanotus, edited by Suspsy

Remember that long lost time when you had to search for an unknown term in a tremendous lexicon, through library research or by making contact with friends via mail in paper form (because phone calls were so expensive), post being delayed by two weeks and another two until you got an answer? Back in that legendary pre-digital time, it sometimes could take quite a while to find the information you wanted. While some of these things are not yet completely obsolete, we modern humans tend to consult our digital devices as a first step, and, in way more cases than not, that piece of electronic magic and its worldwide virtual backup provide a more or less viable answer within the blink of an eye. However, seldom but occasionally, one may encounter a term or name which the likes of Google, Yahoo, Bing or whatever search engine you prefer are forced to surrender…

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…. today I’ll introduce you to a dinosaur figure of unknown species, age, history and producer (somewhat). I found it by chance on eBay and not a single bidder was interested in it, so I picked it up despite the lack of information. Even the seller could not say anything other than it was found in the display case of some deceased man. In fact, the only information I could find originated from this blog, as Libraraptor reviewed a figure somewhat similar to this more than four years back. Unfortunately, I have almost nothing to add to his findings about the producer, only that I could make out a Turkish company named Furkan Group which produces a variety of toys and games, but it’s unlikely they are the producer of the model reviewed here given their assortment of products.

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While the figure makes a comparably nice and detailed model, its species remains unknown. The closest guess may be some scelidosaur, though the armor and spines are not quite as numerous as they should be. So maybe it’s meant to represent an early stage of evolution of this dinosaur group? Without any specific genus to pin this figure down, more discussion about its scientific accuracy obviously makes no sense, so let’s have a short look to it’s features.

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The model measures 28 cm in width, 19 cm in height, and an imposing 58 cm measured along the dinosaur’s body. The overall coloration may be a bit uninspired and boring, but given the grade of armor on this ornithischian, it may benefit from keeping a low profile. The pose is probably a compromise to the material’s qualities. The polystone the model is made from is very brittle and so the comparably slender tail was in great need of some support to prevent breakage. The same goes for the finely sculpted legs with their slender ankles and sharp clawed feet–they had to be placed firmly on the ground and enforced with some green shrubs to give the model more stability. Nevertheless, the pose looks not too static, but quite natural, as if the beast would suddenly stop grazing to focus its attention on some disturbing sound or movement nearby.

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The overall detail is quite nice with different types of skin textures from some rough leathery type on the body to small round scales on the head and hexagonal scales on the belly. The muscle bulges and skin folds look very authentic, as well as the digits and claws. A small drawback are the quite simple sculpted shrubs to reinforce the legs, but they are well hidden behind them and can hardly be seen from the main front view. Another downside is the dorsal ridge of scales. While it looks very nice from a first view, one may quickly recognize that the scales are of different shape (from rounded to pointed or even triangular) and have broad, unsculpted tops. In fact, it looks like the scales had been cut out manually with a jigsaw.

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As Libraraptor already mentioned for his Nodosaurid, the model is hard to classify, as its overall appearance ranks it with some resin models (which it technically is) while the choice of material and other aspects (the base is made from some varnished MDF) cries out trumpery. Personally I like the figure, the dinosaur it (supposedly) represents and the secret of it’s origin. However, if anyone of you knows a thing or two about this model or the line of models, please let me know.

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