Author Topic: Halichoeres's drawings  (Read 10048 times)

Halichoeres

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #100 on: September 14, 2020, 02:52:21 AM »

Legnonotus krambergeri (Bartram 1977)
Upper Triassic
colored pencil and ink
Legnonotus (Actinopterygii: Holostei: Ginglymodi) was a very primitive relative of gars, and had the heavy ganoid scales of gars. But the area around the dorsal fin base was bare skin, maybe to give it finer control of the individual fin rays. Knifefishes and bowfin use long fins like this to maneuver stealthily through complex environments, backward and forward. This could have been similar. It might also be a convenient place to suffuse with pigment during courtship and spawning (I chickened out, though, and left it in non-breeding condition).
« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 02:52:56 AM by Halichoeres »
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Faelrin

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #101 on: September 14, 2020, 04:44:50 AM »
I just stumbled upon this thread (I really ought to check out the art section more frequently), and man is your artwork absolutely beautiful. I've also learned of several interesting fishes for the first time checking this out, such as the eel shark (really want a figure of that now).

It also reminded me of how I used to draw a lot back in high school (mainly dragons). I really ought to get a sketch book and pick it back up again one of these days. On a similar note I ought to get back into sculpting as well, which I haven't done that since I was in high school either.
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Shonisaurus

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #102 on: September 14, 2020, 04:55:10 AM »
Apart from being an ichthyologist, you are a consecrated artist, you make some unusual drawings. I congratulate you Halichoeres, every day I like your thread more.

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #103 on: September 14, 2020, 02:18:11 PM »
Love the stripe pattern, looks really natural.

Halichoeres

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #104 on: October 25, 2020, 11:00:43 PM »
Thank you all for the kind words.

Usually Inktober finds me very busy with no time to draw, but a recent minor injury kept me from enough tasks that I had time to dash this off.


Araucarioxylon arizonicum, reconstructed following Creber & Ash 2000 (Palaeontology 43: 15); despite the name, it didn't much resemble modern Araucaria. They often toppled into rivers to be covered in silt after the current eroded the bank, which is how we have so many beautiful petrified wood specimens. Also seen are the fern †Phlebopteris and the lungfish †Arganodus, and some hypothetical lycophytes.

A 2007 review suggests that †Pullisilvaxylon arizonicum is the more appropriate name for these specimens. My brief survey of the literature suggests this is still contentious, but that the name Araucarioxylon is unlikely to survive.
In the kingdom of the blind, better take public transit. Well, in the kingdom of the sighted, too, really--almost everyone is a terrible driver.

My attempt to find the best toy of every species: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3390.0

My trade/sale/wishlist thread: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3299.0

Sometimes I draw pictures: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=4856.0

Shonisaurus

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #105 on: October 25, 2020, 11:12:39 PM »
@Halichoeres My wishes that you fully recover from your injury. On the other hand, this reconstruction of that Triassic fauna is brutal. That drawing is a complete work of art. On the other hand, I admire you, you have an admirable culture about biology and fauna in general, and it is not only fish that is your specialty. By the way, how tall was the araucarioxylon arizonicum according to paleontological discoveries?
« Last Edit: October 25, 2020, 11:14:04 PM by Shonisaurus »

PlesiosaurusNessy

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #106 on: October 25, 2020, 11:52:43 PM »
@Halichoeres : This is a great drawing of this ancient prehistoric tree and, it looks exactly like a ca. 4 metres high tree in front of my house!
The tree is now 40 years old, but I don´t know its scientific name!

The Araucaria nowadays is very old from prehistoric times, too, but looks totally different to your drawing, the neighbours opposite the street
have an Araucaria in their garden, it has very sharp leaves, is growing extremely slowly, but can get very old and tall!

Your drawings are absolut fabulous and I wished, I had so much talent to draw!
The drawing of Legnonotus is great, it looks very authentic and very real!

God bless you, to recover soon of your hurt!

To answer the question of @Shonisaurus,the Araucarioxylon had a height up to 60 metres and 60 cm in diameter! Please,have a look into
Wikipedia and Google, there you´ll find a lot of articles about Araucarioxylon!
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Gothmog the Baryonyx

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #107 on: October 26, 2020, 01:14:23 AM »
Oh that is lovely art, I wish you well
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Shonisaurus

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #108 on: October 26, 2020, 04:42:27 AM »
@PlesiosaurusNessy Thanks for the info. I didn't know it was such a big tree.

Faelrin

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #109 on: October 30, 2020, 07:41:43 PM »
Beautiful scene. Love the little fish poking its head out. Sorry to hear you've experienced an injury as well. I hope you are feeling better in no time.
Film Accurate Mattel JW and JP toys list (incl. extended canon species, etc):
http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=6702.0

For a list of what formations the Beasts of the Mesozoic raptor and ceratopsian series species (including some possible tyrannosaurids) were found, go here: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=6906.msg239970#msg239970

Halichoeres

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #110 on: November 02, 2020, 12:55:53 AM »
@Halichoeres : This is a great drawing of this ancient prehistoric tree and, it looks exactly like a ca. 4 metres high tree in front of my house!
The tree is now 40 years old, but I don´t know its scientific name!

The Araucaria nowadays is very old from prehistoric times, too, but looks totally different to your drawing, the neighbours opposite the street
have an Araucaria in their garden, it has very sharp leaves, is growing extremely slowly, but can get very old and tall!

Your drawings are absolut fabulous and I wished, I had so much talent to draw!
The drawing of Legnonotus is great, it looks very authentic and very real!

God bless you, to recover soon of your hurt!

To answer the question of @Shonisaurus,the Araucarioxylon had a height up to 60 metres and 60 cm in diameter! Please,have a look into
Wikipedia and Google, there you´ll find a lot of articles about Araucarioxylon!

Thank you for the kind words and well wishes! I wonder if your tree is a fir (genus Abies). They're reasonably common in temperate climates and sometimes have a growth habit sort of like this. Thanks also for the swift reply to Shoni's question that I quite overlooked :)

Thanks to everyone else for visiting and wishing me well. I had to get some glass cut out of my foot but it's all healed up now.
In the kingdom of the blind, better take public transit. Well, in the kingdom of the sighted, too, really--almost everyone is a terrible driver.

My attempt to find the best toy of every species: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3390.0

My trade/sale/wishlist thread: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3299.0

Sometimes I draw pictures: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=4856.0

Halichoeres

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #111 on: November 11, 2020, 04:51:25 PM »

Illinichthys cozarti, an actinopterygian named for the Illinois (Illiniwek) Confederation, a group of Native tribes from the western Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River region. It hails from the Mazon Creek locality (home of Tullimonstrum), Upper Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. Total length is about 8-9 cm. I'm not happy with how the eye turned out, but ink can be pretty unforgiving so it's just going to stay this way.
In the kingdom of the blind, better take public transit. Well, in the kingdom of the sighted, too, really--almost everyone is a terrible driver.

My attempt to find the best toy of every species: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3390.0

My trade/sale/wishlist thread: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3299.0

Sometimes I draw pictures: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=4856.0

Shonisaurus

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #112 on: November 11, 2020, 05:10:20 PM »
It is an exceptional drawing like all those you make of fish, from what I see and comment with ink you cannot rectify the defect of the Illinichthys eye but I honestly know it because you have commented on it, it hardly shows, I honestly see it perfect.

Newt

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #113 on: November 11, 2020, 05:47:27 PM »
Ooh, nice work on the Illinichthys! Palaeonisciforms don't get enough attention. Out of curiosity, what sort of pens are you using for your ink work?

Halichoeres

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #114 on: November 11, 2020, 06:45:39 PM »
Thank you both!

Ooh, nice work on the Illinichthys! Palaeonisciforms don't get enough attention. Out of curiosity, what sort of pens are you using for your ink work?

I mostly use Pigma Micron pens of various weights, but I make particularly heavy use of the 005 pen. I also have a set of Faber-Castell artist pens but I can never keep their sizes straight relative to the Pigmas.
In the kingdom of the blind, better take public transit. Well, in the kingdom of the sighted, too, really--almost everyone is a terrible driver.

My attempt to find the best toy of every species: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3390.0

My trade/sale/wishlist thread: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3299.0

Sometimes I draw pictures: http://dinotoyblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=4856.0

Stegotyranno

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #115 on: November 11, 2020, 06:46:14 PM »
nice

Newt

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #116 on: November 11, 2020, 06:51:46 PM »
I mostly use Pigma Micron pens of various weights, but I make particularly heavy use of the 005 pen. I also have a set of Faber-Castell artist pens but I can never keep their sizes straight relative to the Pigmas.


Thanks! You're getting good detail from the Pigmas. I always have trouble with the smaller nib sizes skipping or blotching, which is probably just me being too heavy-handed.

Jose S.M.

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #117 on: November 11, 2020, 07:37:43 PM »
That's a very nice looking fish! Also I like the handwriting of the name and signature very much.

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #118 on: November 11, 2020, 09:51:27 PM »
Beautiful drawing, though it doesn't look like a very appetizing fish. I think I'd throw it back. I'd be set in the Jurassic, however, I've seen pictures of fossil Scallops from that time and it's good to know one of my favourite foods was around back then if I'm ever time travelling.

Ooh, I just scrolled back some and noticed the gorgeous Legnonotus (great colours, by the way) - now that's a sandwich fish!
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 09:54:13 PM by triceratops83 »

ceratopsian

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Re: Halichoeres's drawings
« Reply #119 on: November 11, 2020, 11:15:52 PM »
Even if you are not satisfied with the eye, you have been very successful at capturing the feel of volume in the body. I enjoy seeing your drawings.