Parasaurolophus (Baby)(Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

Review and photos by Quentin Brendel, edited by Suspsy

With its long, tubular crest protruding from the back of its skull, Parasaurolophus is one of the most easily-recognized hadrosaurids. The model to be reviewed today does not have much of one, being a juvenile animal. Safari Ltd’s rendition, while not perfect, is still a nice toy for collectors and children alike. This figure is stamped 1997, coming out a year after the original Wild Safari adult Parasaurolophus.

The dinosaur is posed so that it looks like it is calling out, with its head up and mouth open, perhaps to the adult. The primary colour on this figure is a brownish orange, which, unlike in the adult, is solid and does not fade to a darker shade. The underside is painted beige with hard edges. There is an intermediate colour between it and the orange which has feathered edges, though it lacks the intermediate colour on the right side of the torso. The most striking part of this colour scheme are the green dorsal markings. The back is painted a dark green with lighter green patches on top of it. These markings are also on the top of the crest as well as on the dinosaur’s face. On the sides are smaller green spots which resemble the rosettes of a jaguar. On mine, these are asymmetrical with more spots on the right side. The nails are painted a navy blue and the inside of the mouth is pink. The eyes have black pupils on yellow and a white spot to simulate a reflective surface.

The neck is very thin and goose-like. Recent reconstructions depict Parasaurolophus holding its neck forward and being better-muscled, similar to a horse. The hands each have five fingers (one too many), however, only the outermost digit should have a claw. The others were bound together in a hoof-like structure with the metacarpals being longer. It is not to scale with the adult and should be smaller.

Hadrosaurs are known not only from skeletal remains, but many skin impressions as well. This makes it much easier (or harder, depending on how you look at it) to make an accurate model. The skin of the baby Parasaurolophus has large, wrinkly striations going down its neck, trunk, and tail. They are on the legs more subtly. The skin would have been scaly but the tiny scales of a hadrosaur would not be too visible at this scale anyways. Lambeosaurines also had a series of larger scales on the ventral side of the base of the tail, but even these would probably be too small to sculpt. There should be a bumpy ridge running down the length of the back as well. The most conspicuous inaccuracy of this figure is in the skull. A newly-described specimen of a baby Parasaurolophus is known to have had a crest not unlike that of a Hypacrosaurus which would have later grown into the characteristic crest of the adult parasaurolophus. Safari’s Hypacrosaurus Baby, while not perfect, would actually work better as a baby Parasaurolophus than this one.

The Wild Safari Parasaurolophus baby, despite its inaccuracies, is still a classic figure to those who (like me) grew up with the old Wild Safari line. It does go well with the adult as well as the other baby dinosaurs from the earlier years of WS. It sometimes makes its way onto eBay, but can also occasionally be found in stores with old stock and is more common (from my experience) than the adult. I happened to find three of mine at an old toy store for the great sum of seventy-five cents. Despite Parasaurolophus‘ popularity, there are not as many good figures of it as one might expect, almost none which are completely up-to-date, and very few baby dinosaurs in general.

Dimorphodon (Supreme by CollectA)

In early 2015, CollectA released one of the biggest and best pterosaur toys of all time: the Supreme-class Guidraco! With its great size, fearsome appearance, and magnificent detailing, it was a must-have for any pterosaur aficionado! For 2017, CollectA has followed up with a Dimorphodon at the same scale.

Like the Guidraco, the Dimorphodon has been sculpted in a walking pose with its wings neatly folded up. Its huge head is turned sightly to the right and its long tail is raised high and swaying slightly to the left. This gives the toy a length of 37 cm and a height of 13 cm. Granted, it’s not as enormous as the Guidraco, but it’s still one of the biggest pterosaur toys ever made. And it easily dwarfs the other renditions of Dimorphodon, at least that I know of!


The main colour on this pterosaur is sandy yellow. Dull brown wash is used to accentuate the shaggy coat of pycnofibres covered its entire body save for the bill, hands, feet, and tail vane. The various wing membranes are all taupe grey. The underbelly is beige and the claws are black. Dark brown is used for the markings on the head, the spots on the body, and the stripes on the tail. The nostrils are black, the inside of the mouth is dull pink, and the teeth are grey. Finally, the large, round eyes are painted with glossy black that I can even see my blurry reflection in. It’s a pretty swell colour scheme overall, although I would have preferred the teeth in white rather than grey.

As mentioned above, most of the Dimorphodon‘s body is covered in meticulously sculpted pycnofibres. The wings membranes have faint creases to give them a leathery appearance and the feet, the hands, and the enormous bill also have faint wrinkles. The inside of the mouth is nicely detailed with a long, skinny tongue and the teeth and claws are pleasingly pointy. And just like the Guidraco, this Dimorphodon boasts a hinged lower jaw that allows you the options of an open or closed mouth. The large front teeth interlock nicely. In contrast to its exaggerated portrayal in Jurassic World (ugh), Dimorphodon was a rather poor flyer with a light, fragile skull and a relatively weak bite. You’d pose overwhelmingly more danger to it than vice versa. That said, it still would have been the personification of death for any insect or small vertebrate inhabiting the Early Jurassic.

On that note, this Dimorphodon does have a dentition error in that there ought to be ten large teeth at the front of the lower jaw as opposed to just six. As well, the elongated fifth digits on the hind feet should not have claws. Aside from that, however, this figure is very accurate indeed. The proportions and profile are correct and the the figure is immediately recognizable as a Dimorphodon. The fenestrae are slightly visible beneath the skin, but not enough to be a case of “shrink wrapping.” The propatagium and the brachopatagium also appear to be correct, with the latter attaching to the hind limb near the ankle. The uropatagium stretches from the base of the tail to the elongated fifth toes. The tip of the tail features a large vane for stability during flight.


A couple of small errors notwithstanding, this toy truly is fantastic, every bit as much as the Guidraco and hands down the best plastic representation of Dimorphodon to date. Definitely a top contender for the best prehistoric toy of 2017!

A huge thank you to CollectA for this review sample!

Tyrannosaurus rex (Original Version)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

In 2016, a new brand of toys came onto the dinosaur collecting scene, with a huge selection in their Ancient Animals line. Recur, and its parent company Ankyl Toys Co. Ltd., has been around for a while, but only recently have their products have been revealed to the public (presumably for the first time outside of China). What sets their products apart from the competition is the fact all of them are made out of flexible PVC plastic, and most are filled with a synthetic cotton. As of now, there are 41 toys to choose from, and some of them appear to be in different sub-lines, although Recur has not come out and say if this is true or not. For instance, most of their new products for 2017 are simply jumbo-sized versions of some of the dinosaurs they already released, but I don’t know if they have stated anywhere that these ones are part of a different group. There is also a massive difference in the style of how some of them are made. For instance, the Edmontonia is clearly cartoonish, but the Ankylosaurus they made for this year is a lot more realistic in appearance. Today’s review is another example of this strange contrast in style. What I have here today is what I like to call Recur’s monstrous version of Tyrannosaurus, which was sculpted in a tripod stance instead of having a horizontal pose like the one that was already reviewed.



As for accuracy, there’s nothing praiseworthy about this figure other than the fact that it has two tiny arms. But I’m finding it very hard to come up with the words to describe how inaccurate this T. rex is. For one thing, the skull is way too box-like and does not match up with that of the real animal at all. The skull even lacks the creature’s signature binocular vision, which is something that even collector oriented companies (*cough* Rebor *cough*) seem to forget on their figures. Another prominent issue I see with this figure is that it does not match up with the shape of the real T. rex. I cannot describe what’s wrong with it without writing for hours on end to explain it all, so I will simply say that the 2016 version is a vast improvement in terms of accuracy since it is not a tripod, and at least looks a little more like an actual T. rex than this one ever could.

After all that criticism, you might wonder why I chose to buy this T. rex over the newer one to purchase. Well truth be told, I like this version better. When I say this is the monstrous version, I mean it. The toy looks gnarly and ready to tear you to shreds. However, that is part of what I like about it. I realize not everyone is going to like this figure the way I do (if not at all). But it is clear to me that this toy was made for kids as opposed to adults. The T. rex is posed in a dynamic turning-to-the-side motion, which is up for interpretation. Maybe it’s about to get charged by a Triceratops, and it dodged the hit? Who knows, and that’s what I like about this toy. The materials may not be up to Papo standards, but the detailing and colour choices make it seem like a living creature to me. Of course, the realism is diminished greatly once you get to the blunted teeth, but one must remember that this product was made for kids first and foremost. Not older collectors like us. That being said, it’s time to discuss the colouration of this toy. The model is simply dark, swampy green with an even dirtier swampy green on the bottom. The claws are your typical black and the teeth are white. Inside the mouth, you will find a shade of dark pink, and the eyes are orange. It stands 13.5 cm tall and measures 20.5 cm long.

Overall, I can’t say I recommend this to collectors. But as a kids’ toy, it could work perfectly as long as you don’t use it in an educational context that declares it to be an accurate model. As of now the only place I recommend buying it from is www.dejankins.com, as their prices are often fair, and it carries the entire line as of today. However, the supply of most of them is extremely limited, so if you want one, contact DeJankins now before they’re sold out.