Einiosaurus (CollectA)

After years of going ignored by toy companies, the centrosaurine known as Einiosaurus is finally enjoying a surge of attention. First there was the endearing miniature from PNSO, then the sterling rendition from Wild Safari. And now we have CollectA’s take on the ‘buffalo lizard.’

The first thing you notice about this figure is its size. This Einiosaurus is significantly smaller than previous Standard-sized ceratopsians, measuring only 12 cm long and standing slightly over 5 cm tall. I’ve been informed by CollectA that this is part of an effort to put their ceratopsians in scale with one another from now on. So for example, a future Standard Triceratops figure would be closer in size to last year’s Mercuriceratops.

The main colour on the Einiosaurus is olive green with a pale yellow underbelly, faint brown stripes, medium grey claws, and black accents for the speculative row of quills on the tail. The head features patches of pale yellow with brown half-ovals on the frill, medium grey horns and epoccipitals, blacks eyes, a dark grey beak, and a pink mouth. There are also blackened tips on the two frill horns. Flashy yet realistic.

Despite its size, the Einiosaurus‘ skin is beautifully sculpted with a varying pebble texture all over and rows of round osteoderms along the flanks and back. The nasal horn and beak feature very faint grooves and the powerful muscles in the neck and limbs are very well-defined. The feet have the correct number of claws and are better shaped and positioned to reflect our current understanding of their anatomy. The tail is longer than on other such figures, the hips are the correct width, and the horns and epoccipitals are the proper shape and size. As for the quills on the back, there’s no direct fossil evidence for such a feature, and they’re not everyone’s cup of tea. But they’ve come to be a signature feature of CollectA and I’m fine with them myself.

The Three Einiosauruses Gruff

With its exquisite sculpting and more accurate proportions, this Einiosaurus represents a major improvement over previous CollectA ceratopsians. I highly recommend this figure and eagerly look forward to whatever ones are slated for next year!

Thank you to CollectA for this review sample. 🙂

Allosaurus (Unknown Company)

Review and photos by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

My favourite dinosaur has been Allosaurus for many years. Recently I found this figure on eBay and when she came in the mail, she was bigger and prettier than I had imagined. That was when I knew I had to do a review. I searched high and low for a manufacturer name somewhere on the figure, and tried looking on the Internet, but all in vain. Still, though, I think this is a great figure that rivals even the name brand models like Schleich and Safari, so in spite of being unable to locate the manufacturer, I am going to go ahead and do a review of this pretty figure.

This figure got a number of things correct that many generic dinosaurs often make mistakes on. For example, I have seen Allosaurus figures that show the dinosaur with two fingers or even five. This one accurately possesses three fingers on each hand. It does not have one finger longer than the other two, unfortunately. It is also incredibly durable, something that I unfortunately can’t always say for Safari dinosaurs. I only had their Dilophosaurus one day before the arm popped off. The dinosaur is hollow, so it can be squeezed a little, but the plastic is nice and strong. There are no spindly pieces that can break off.The neck is nice and long, too, like an Allosaurus‘ neck should be. Often times the neck is too short in a number of other Allosaurus models, more like the neck of a Tyrannosaurus. The throat has something like a fan along its underside. The feet are a good size and are not oversized as they often are in some dinosaur figures. The colouring is interesting too; this figure reminds me of a reconstruction of Allosaurus that was popular when I was a kid.

The figure is tan with dark brown accenting on the top of the body and head, and a light green underbelly. The eyes are red with black pupils. I would like to point out that this figure is probably a female Allosaurus, as the ridges over the eyes are more rounded and less like horns. The figure also features lips around the teeth, which was a nice innovative touch for a figure that isn’t terribly new. The jaws are fused between the teeth, which lends some extra durability to the head. The nostrils and earholes are present. The figure does have a tripod pose, but that helps it to have a stable stance even if it isn’t perfectly accurate.


In short, this is a great Allosaurus, even though it’s not perfect. This figure is not expensive at all and is relatively easy to find on eBay. I got mine for $7.

Brachiosaurus (Conquering the Earth by Schleich)

​Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

With Schleich’s 2017 crop of models consisting of animals that hail from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous, it is understandable that at least one Jurassic sauropod would be released. Although to be honest, I was hoping we would get a new Apatosaurus, or even Brontosaurus.

The 2017 Brachiosaurus is the 5th model of the creature that Schleich ever released. However, I can’t help but wonder if they are getting lazier when it comes to making their new products. My first impressions are mixed with this model. It is a lot better than the previous World of History version, but it still has its flaws. One of them centers around the legs. They look weird, and remind me of sausages. On top of that, they have the EXACT SAME texture and look as the legs on the Barapasaurus, which indicates that this model may have been digitally sculpted and they simply reused aspects from the other one to save time and money.



When it comes to scientific accuracy, Schleich can at least be praised for their attempt to get the feet right again. The front feet only have one claw each as opposed to the elephantine feet of the WoH model, But this also stems from the fact that the feet are made the same exact way as those found of the Barapasaurus. The first issue that I found on this model is that they based it off the proportions of Giraffatitan brancai instead of an actual Brachiosaurus altithorax. Also, the nostril openings are in the wrong spot again, up by the crest when they should be lower towards the front of the snout. The only things that make this model in tune with modern reconstructions of Brachiosaurus is that the neck is held out in front instead of being held upwards like a periscope.

In terms of detailing, only the top half of the model is decked out with really big scales (which would be a lot smaller on the real animal) while the rest of it is features nothing but very minimal wrinkles. It’s almost like the model was supposed to be covered with the scales, but the sculptor was either running out of time, or simply did not care to finish the job and so Schleich ran with it because they wanted to save time and money. At around 14 inches long, this model would be around 1:64 Scale, making it around the same scale as your average run of the Mill Toy Car by Mattel. The colours on this model are simply different shades of green. The base is light green while the scales are dark green with some traces of light green painted on them. The eyes are orange and the teeth are all painted white, with a red tongue sculpted inside the mouth. The claws are black and the bottom of the figure is painted in a greenish beige.

Overall, I can’t speak for everyone, when I tell you all that i actually like this model. It looks a lot better then the WoH version, but that’s not saying much, as that model was looks very ugly by comparison to this. I would also like to note that, despite the weird-looking legs, this new version looks a lot more convincing as a real member of the brachiosaur family then the WoH one ever did, but I’m sure it will never live up to the very first one they made for the Replicasaurus line back in 1997, or the 2008 remake. As usual, if you want this model, you can find it (almost) anywhere Schleich dinosaurs are sold.