Tag Archives: Allosaurus

Allosaurus (Conquering the Earth by Schleich)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Back when I reviewed the 2015 Schleich Spinosaurus, I openly stated how annoyed I was over the fact that the company keeps repeating the same species instead of releasing brand new ones. But when the 2017 models came along, I was sort of relieved, as the models had something about them that suggested that the line was starting over, making any future repeat releases from years prior to 2016 warranted. What made me change my stance was the fact that Schleich now gives each of the new models a display tag providing info about the animal. This is why I bought the Brachiosaurus, Stegosaurus, and Allosaurus when I already had the previous versions from 2012 in my possession. It’s these display tags that remind me of the old Replicasaurus models that I never had a chance to collect, and I think it’s the perfect reason to release repeats of species previously released from 2012 to 2015. So with that out of the way, it’s time to move on to my review of this new Allosaurus.

When this model was first revealed, people were quick to judge it based the stock photo, which showed it at a bad angle. Now that the final product is in my hands, I can say that their pessimism was warranted. It repeats the same mistakes that Schleich still refuses to correct on their theropods to this day. These mistakes should be obvious to veteran readers of the DTB, but for those of you who are new to the community, these mistakes are as follows. First, the feet are oversized and the arms are pronated, making the hands look like slappers instead of clappers. The reason this is wrong is because the anatomy of a theropod’s wrists prevent them from being twisted in this fashion without breaking the poor animal’s bones. Another issue I can see with this model is one that is pretty common among Allosaurus toys and models alike: the lack of a large claw on each hand. Now I will admit, when I reviewed Allosaurus toys in the past, I tended to forget about this important feature. This is because when I think of enlarged foreclaws on theropods, I think of spinosaurs and megaraptorids. But Allosaurus is known to have possessed large killings claw as well, and this model lacks them entirely. Perhaps this feature is often omitted for safety reasons, but with the claws being blunted on this figure, I don’t see that as a viable excuse. Other issues with this figure include the fact that the torso is too short, which situates the arms a lot closer to the legs then they should be. Also, the body needs more muscle, as do the legs. The legs are just too skinny and almost poorly sculpted as well. By contrast, the previous version had some beefy legs that look like they had muscle to them.

In terms of detail, the Allosaurus is covered in scales that actually look like scales as opposed to the multi-shaped scales on the World of History version. Each scale is individually sculpted on this new one, and the only parts that don’t have them are the neck and the bottom half of the figure. In those areas, there are just wrinkles. However, the wrinkles on the old version look a lot more realistic and were more apparent, which made it look more like a living, breathing animal as opposed to just a lump of plastic made in the vague shape of a dinosaur. The head on this new Allosaurus shows a lot more improvement over the head sculpted on the World Of History version, but they still managed to get things wrong. When the mouth is opened, the jaw still looks unnatural, although it’s nowhere near as bad as the previous version. The skull looks like an Allosaurus more than the previous version, but it’s too wide when viewed from the front, and is too short when viewed from the side. When the jaw is opened, you can see that Schleich once again gave the figure a tongue that takes up the entirety of the lower jaw. At least this time the tongue looks a lot more natural than the old version’s, and the teeth look a lot more realistic.

Colour-wise, this figure is not as drab as the original Replicasaurus model, but it is still another brown figure in their lineup. This time, the back of the toy is adorned with red lines that subtly fit in with the brown. It also has a dark tan tint to it, which further accents the colour scheme. The claws are a light black, and the teeth are white.

If you plan on buying this figure, one thing that I must point out is that the paint quality is pure garbage, because it rubs off very easily. The tip of the tail was completely rubbed off when I first received it, which exposed the white plastic that the toy is made out of. On top of that, you can’t open the mouth without rubbing even more paint off. And so my Allosaurus now has a white goatee thanks to the poor quality of the paint Schleich decided to use. I think the main problem with this model is the fact that is made out of a waxy material, which does not allow paint to adhere too very well to it.

In case anyone is wondering, the toy is 10 inches long, so it’s somewhere in the 1:30 scale range. All I know is that it’s certainly too big to be in 1:40 Scale, and the proportions don’t make it a very realistic replica of a theropod. It certainly does not feel alive like many of Papo’s models, and I feel there’s a certain artificial touch to the sculpt that diminishes its realism greatly. In my honest opinion, the World of History version was a lot more believable as a real animal than this one, which means I cannot recommend this new one to anyone who is not a diehard Schleich collector.

Allosaurus (Unknown Company)

Review and photos by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

My favourite dinosaur has been Allosaurus for many years. Recently I found this figure on eBay and when she came in the mail, she was bigger and prettier than I had imagined. That was when I knew I had to do a review. I searched high and low for a manufacturer name somewhere on the figure, and tried looking on the Internet, but all in vain. Still, though, I think this is a great figure that rivals even the name brand models like Schleich and Safari, so in spite of being unable to locate the manufacturer, I am going to go ahead and do a review of this pretty figure.

This figure got a number of things correct that many generic dinosaurs often make mistakes on. For example, I have seen Allosaurus figures that show the dinosaur with two fingers or even five. This one accurately possesses three fingers on each hand. It does not have one finger longer than the other two, unfortunately. It is also incredibly durable, something that I unfortunately can’t always say for Safari dinosaurs. I only had their Dilophosaurus one day before the arm popped off. The dinosaur is hollow, so it can be squeezed a little, but the plastic is nice and strong. There are no spindly pieces that can break off.The neck is nice and long, too, like an Allosaurus‘ neck should be. Often times the neck is too short in a number of other Allosaurus models, more like the neck of a Tyrannosaurus. The throat has something like a fan along its underside. The feet are a good size and are not oversized as they often are in some dinosaur figures. The colouring is interesting too; this figure reminds me of a reconstruction of Allosaurus that was popular when I was a kid.

The figure is tan with dark brown accenting on the top of the body and head, and a light green underbelly. The eyes are red with black pupils. I would like to point out that this figure is probably a female Allosaurus, as the ridges over the eyes are more rounded and less like horns. The figure also features lips around the teeth, which was a nice innovative touch for a figure that isn’t terribly new. The jaws are fused between the teeth, which lends some extra durability to the head. The nostrils and earholes are present. The figure does have a tripod pose, but that helps it to have a stable stance even if it isn’t perfectly accurate.


In short, this is a great Allosaurus, even though it’s not perfect. This figure is not expensive at all and is relatively easy to find on eBay. I got mine for $7.

Allosaurus (Nature World by Boley)

Review and photos by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

Allosaurus became my favourite dinosaur after I saw it in the Natural History Museum and the BBC’s Allosaurus: A Walking with Dinosaurs Special. Yes, I have been in love with it ever since.

Allosaurus is often pictured alongside Tyrannosaurus rex in pop culture, almost as a sidekick. Although they are superficially similar in appearance (and the similarity is sometimes exaggerated in depictions of Allosaurus), Allosaurus lived tens of millions of years before T. rex and belonged to a different family. It was noticeably smaller, but the arms were larger in proportion to its body than those of T. rex. Also, Allosaurus had unique crests over its eyes. Although these crests are not particularly prominent in this figure, they are present and especially noticeable when the head is viewed from the front.

As you can see, Boley got away from the tripod stance on this one. If the figure is standing properly, the tail inclines toward the ground, but sweeps up short of actually resting on it. The plastic is also of great consistency and is very soft to the touch. The body is painted green with a tan underbelly and a black stripe running down the top of the body from the nostrils to the tip of its tail. This Allosaurus is also fairly heavyset, but the musculature evident on the haunches prevents this from seeming unrealistic for the strength of the legs to support. The neck muscles are also nicely detailed, with a curve to them, as the animal is looking slightly to the left. This figure won’t hold up for scientific accuracy if it is compared to the ones produced by Safari or Papo, but it is a nice vintage if you will portrait of how Allosaurus was classically perceived. The one complaint I have about this figure is that it portrays Allosaurus with five fingers on each hand, even though we know that it had three.


Despite this inaccuracy, I really like this figure for its uniquely reptilian version of Allosaurus. You can find it at virtually any Walmart.