Tag Archives: Baryonyx

Baryonyx (Papo)

Even for a company who apparently stumble upon scientific fidelity only by accident, Papo have made great strides towards more accurate prehistoric animal figures over the last few years, to the point where they’re even releasing a feathered Velociraptor (which shouldn’t be half as remarkable as it is). However, their Big Beast this year comes in the form of a certain spinosaur, first found in the UK and immortalised in plastic a number of times already. Yes, it’s Walker’s heavy claw, and it really wants to reach out and touch you.

Papo Baryonyx profile

The earliest Papo theropods were noted for both resembling Jurassic Park creatures and being frozen in really awkward-looking squatting postures, like they were really straining to…lay an egg. Thankfully, later figures, like the excellent Carnotaurus and rather bizarre ‘running’ T. rex, were sculpted in more convincing and dynamic poses. For whatever reason (nostalgia?), the brand new Baryonyx has returned to the slightly uncomfortable-looking squatting posture of old, albeit with some tweaks to make it a more outrageously in-your-face toy than ever.

Papo Baryonyx dentist POV

Basically, it looks like it’s missing a grappling partner, which is either fantastically awkward-looking or exciting and unique, depending on your point of view. The limbs are sprawled out (perhaps a little more than they should be), the claws are being brandished, and the head’s being thrust forward at…something. I’m of the view that it would’ve looked a lot better in a slightly more subdued pose, but that’s only because there’s a lot to love about it besides.

Papo Baryonyx head

By far the best aspect of this figure is the head. It’s simply fantastic. Sure, there are flaws – the crest should perhaps be a little further back, while the jaw muscles could do with a tweak (some seem to be missing altogether at the back of the head, although the articulation probably has a lot to do with that). However, this is still probably the best head on a spinosaur toy yet made. Characteristic spinosaur features such as the ‘rosette’ of teeth, the notch in the upper jaw, retracted nostrils and single midline crest are all recreated quite faithfully, while the level of sculptural detail is in keeping with the remarkably high standard we’ve come to expect from Papo. Best of all, the jaws are just as thin as in real spinosaur specimens, an aspect often overlooked by other manufacturers.

Papo Baryonyx rear 3/4 view

Detail is hardly skimped on on the rest of the figure, either, which looks just as convincing as ever in spite of that very silly posture. Skin sags and folds, muscles bulge, and tendons strain as the big ugly thing lunges forward. In what has become something of a Papo staple, the animal’s aggressive look is enhanced by a line of spiky scales running down the spine and hanging from a dewlap below the jaw and throat. These reach an apex over the hips, which (just as in the real Baryonyx, but moreso in Suchomimus) feature a projection of the vertebrae, forming a small hump. This Todd Marshall-esque embellishment is sure to be divisive, not least because it’s starting to become a little clichéd, but I still really like it – speculative features like this help enhance the character and believability of the model. It’s great to see a nice, fat tail base, too.

Papo Baryonyx propped against wall

Yes, it’s very awesomebro, with a dumb combat-ready pose and an overly shiny paint finish. It’s also big (over 30cm long!), well proportioned, shows an astonishing attention to detail, and has a head sculpt that finally nails the spectacular gharial-like hideousness that has made spinosaurs so beloved the world over. Much as it’s a shame that the pose couldn’t have been less daft and more horizontal (see how much better it already looks in the photo above), this is still a toy I can recommend.

Available from Amazon here.

Baryonyx (Jurassic Hunters by Geoworld)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

If you are deeply into dinosaurs, then you should already know what Baryonyx is. For those who happen to be average lay people or new to the hobby, Baryonyx was a large fish-eating theropod that lived during the Early Cretaceous in what is now England. It coexisted with the more well-known Iguanodon, and they may have crossed paths with each other from time to time. Although there is evidence of a Baryonyx being found with the bones of a Iguanodon in its stomach, it is unclear as to what were the circumstances that brought them together. Did the Baryonyx kill the Iguanodon or was it simply scavenging?

image

When it comes to toys, the only model that people seem to love is the original Invicta model released back in the 80s’. Other models were released since then, but none have been considered nearly as good as that particular model. Unfortunately, the one I’m doing today barely comes close to matching the greatness of the Invicta.

image

The Geoworld Baryonyx stands attached to a base, so its feet are not oversized. It is in a old school pose with its back arched upwards as if it were a tail dragger. Thankfully, the tail is still held clear off the ground. When I look at this figure, the two most prominent faults that stand out to me are the arms and mouth. The arms on this figure are way too short and the hands are also pronated. The problem with the mouth is that the dinosaur’s signature tooth notch is simply not present. This makes the model extremely flawed as a museum accurate replica of Baryonyx.

image

In terms of aesthetics, the model is sculpted with individual scales, giving the skin a bumpy texture. The colour scheme is one of my favorites of the entire line. The base colour is a dark yellow-green with light, brown and dark blue-green stripes on the back. The teeth are white, and the eyes are yellow. The base that the model is connected to is painted yellow with some orange dabbed on.

image

In the end, this is not a great replica. It has two prominent flaws that make it look different from the real creature, and the only redeeming thing that this figure has going for it is the colour scheme. If the model’s arms were longer and the skull had a tooth notch, then this figure would come off as good, but as it is, it qualifies as decent. If you want a better Baryonyx in terms of aesthetics, you’re better off getting Papo’s more interesting take on the species. If you’re looking for a model that’s more accurate, then the Wild Safari Suchomimus would make a good substitute for now. Or at least until some other company makes that one model that beats all the others out of the water.

If you want one, you can easily get it at www.dejankins.com along with all the other models in the Geoworld Jurassic Hunters Collection, or Amazon.com.


Prehistoric Tube A (CollectA)

Following in the footsteps of Safari Ltd and Papo, CollectA burst into the world of miniatures in late 2015. Today we’ll be looking at Prehistoric Tube A, which contains no less than ten figures of some of the most popular dinosaurs and other extinct animals. The tube itself measures 27 cm long, is made of transparent hard plastic, opens like a chest, and fastens shut securely with a clasp. This makes it easier to remove or put away your toys than with the Safari Ltd Toobs. Also keeps your toys safer.

image

First up in the assortment is that unmistakeable piscivore from the UK, Baryonyx. This shrimpy spinosaur measures 8 cm long and is coloured brownish-green with grey stripes, black airbrushing on the hands and feet, black eyes, and a pink mouth. The toy is sculpted in a typical “Grrrr, I’m a big, scary dinosaur!” pose. The skin is wrinkly with thick folds of skin on either flank. While the head looks nice, the hands are pronated and the hips are too wide. It appears that this toy was copied straight from the original Deluxe Baryonyx toy, and it’s a shame that the sculptor didn’t think to fix these errors. As it stands, this is the weakest toy in the lot.

image
image
image

Next up is a dinky Diplodocus standing a good 7.5 cm tall and measuring about 9 cm long. Its main colour is dull green with a pale yellow underbelly, dark brown stripes, dark green feet, and black eyes. Like its larger version, it is rearing up on its hind limbs, seeing off a carnosaur or reaching for the most succulent vegetation. The skin has a pebbled texture and a row of triangular osteoderms runs down nearly the entire length of the spine. The muscles around the chest region are bulging like a powerlifter’s, but the neck looks too thin when viewed from the front. A decent little sauropod overall.

image
image
image

Here’s a cute little Kentrosaurus. From snout to spike tips it measures only 6.5 cm long. It’s rather bland in colour, pine green with darkened feet, back, and underbelly and black eyes. The skin is pebbled and the plates and spikes are smooth. Despite the lack of bright colours, this is quite an impressive miniature, quite unmistakeable as Kentrosaurus. It would work well as a baby for the Standard version, although I suppose the plates and spikes look too mature.

image
image
image

And now here’s a minute Mosasaurus. Actually, this one is the largest of the lot at 12 cm long. It is coloured dark grey with a pale yellow underbelly, white stripes on the body and spots on the tail, black eyes, a pink mouth, and white teeth. The body is smooth save for groves on the head and flippers and thick wrinkles around the neck and flanks. Still no forked tongue, but the pterygoid teeth are present in the upper jaw. Again, while the proportions are no doubt off, this wonderful toy looks positively adorable alongside its Deluxe momma!

image
image
image

Next is a petite Pachycephalosaurus mounted on a muddy brown base. It measures 5.5 cm long and is coloured dull green with yellow airbrushing on the head and underbelly, dark red stripes, dark green hands and feet, and black eyes. The sculpting on this toy is particularly impressive. The hands have the correct number of fingers and the head is adorned with plenty of spiky knobs. The domed cranium is pitted and scarred and the skin is pebbled. A pleasing little toy that could be construed as a baby alongside the Standard version. That is, unless you support the Pachycephalosaurus/Dracorex hypothesis.

image
image
image

Behold, a puny Parasaurolophus, always the “go-to” hadrosaur for any toyline (which, given the wonderful diversity of hadrosaurs, is quite lamentable). It measures 9 cm longe and is orange with a darkened bill, back, hands, and feet, black stripes and eyes, and a red crest. The skin is mostly pebbled with some thick wrinkles along the sides, muscular limbs, and grooves in the crest and the bill. Not nearly as imposing as the massive Deluxe version, of course, but a very nice miniature.

image
image
image

And here’s a pint-sized Pteranodon, another “go-to” prehistoric animal (although the variety among toy pterosaurs is better than with hadrosaurs!). It measures slightly under 5 cm long with a wingspan of 8 cm. The toy is translucent grey with black for the body, arms, and eyes and light orange for the head, hands, and feet. It’s a pretty cool look. The head looks good enough, and I reckon we can forgive the lack of preaxial carpals at this scale, but the wings look too wide for a proper Pteranodon. Still, it’s good enough for a miniature.

image
image
image

Now take a look at this stunted Stegosaurus. It measures 7.5 cm long and is blue-grey with light and medium brown plates and spikes, black eyes, and dark patches on its sides and feet. It is sculpted in a modern pose with its head turned slightly to the right and its formidable tail raised high. The skin has a rough texture with wrinkles on the underside, the head is appropriately small, and the feet have the correct number of toes. As you can see, however, some of the grooved plates are weirdly shaped. At least they don’t have weird patterns like the Standard’s.

image
image
image

Gangway for the teeny Triceratops! Measuring slightly under 7 cm long, it is coloured rather plain: medium grey with black airbrushing, muddy green epoccipitals, horns, and beak, and black eyes. The skin texture is pebbled and there is a row of trademark CollectA quills running atop the hips, although they’re less noticeable due to the colour scheme. The muscles are well-defined, the feet have the proper number of toes, and the head is well-sculpted, although the beak looks slightly off. The alert pose suggests that the Triceratops has just been startled by something. Perhaps by . . .

image
image
image

. . . a tiny Tyrannosaurus rex! Rounding out the set is this fearsome apex predator that measures 9 cm long. The colour scheme is virtually identical to that of Firestreak’s: light brown and pine green plumage with an airbrushed white underbelly, red crest, black eyes, pink mouth, white teeth, darkened fingers and toes, and a medium brown earthen base. The animal is sculpted in a menacing attack pose with its tail twitching, its left leg forward, its head turned to the left, and its jaws wide open. It appears to be based on this year’s Hunting Tyrannosaurus figure. The musculature and plumage are well-sculpted, the hips are the proper width, and the eyes are correctly aligned. This teensy-weensy tyrant is a winner!

image
image
image

If miniatures are your cup of tea, then CollectA’s Prehistoric Tube A is right up your alley! Some of the little toys do have flaws, but overall, I think they’re on par with Safari Ltd’s and definitely superior to Papo’s. Their small size and durable carrying case make them ideal travel toys for children (or for certain adults!). I hope these sets become a mainstay of CollectA’s annual assortment from now on. A prehistoric mammal tube would be especially sweet!

image