Tag Archives: Brachiosaurus

Brachiosaurus (Baby)(Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

Although Brachiosaurus remains one of the most popular dinosaurs, in large part due to once being heralded(incorrectly) as the “biggest of the big,” the reality is that very little is known about this Jurassic giant. Only scant fossil remains have been found in North America, and what was once thought to have been an African species is now recognized as a separate genus, Giraffatitan. Interestingly though, SMA 0009, a nearly complete skeleton of a juvenile sauropod from the Morrison Formation, may actually be a baby Brachiosaurus!

Safari Ltd first released their Brachiosaurus Baby figure all the way back in 1997. This repainted version came out in 2013, at least according to the date printed on its tummy. Its main colours are grass green and sandy yellow with orange eyes, a pink mouth, and black claws. It’s a simple but bold look, appropriate for a children’s toy. The little giant proudly stands 7.5 cm tall and measures 8 cm long.

The Brachiosaurus is sculpted with its neck reared back and its head turned to the right. Being such an early Safari product, it lacks the magnificent sculpting detail that we’ve come to expect from their figures nowadays. The skin has a very basic wrinkled texture all over, a soft ridge of vertebrae runs down the back and tail, and a keel runs down the front of the neck. The proportions are pretty much what you’d expect in a baby sauropod toy: an oversized head, a relatively short neck and tail, and stout, stubby legs. Indeed, with its large, round eyes and decidedly friendly expression, this little sauropod looks quite, quite cute! You almost want to offer it a slice of grape or a fresh spinach leaf.

There are a couple of major inaccuracies to be found here. First, there appear to be no visible nostrils anywhere on the head. And second, the front feet each have five claws, whereas the real animal would only have had claws on its thumbs. I have no doubt that the overall proportions are off as well, but given the age and simplicity of this toy, I see little point in dwelling on them. And again, we don’t know for certain yet what a juvenile Brachiosaurus really looked like.

Overall, I find the Brachiosaurus Baby to be an endearing little toy in spite of its shortcomings. Young children especially should adore it.

Brachiosaurus (Conquering the Earth by Schleich)

​Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

With Schleich’s 2017 crop of models consisting of animals that hail from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous, it is understandable that at least one Jurassic sauropod would be released. Although to be honest, I was hoping we would get a new Apatosaurus, or even Brontosaurus.

The 2017 Brachiosaurus is the 5th model of the creature that Schleich ever released. However, I can’t help but wonder if they are getting lazier when it comes to making their new products. My first impressions are mixed with this model. It is a lot better than the previous World of History version, but it still has its flaws. One of them centers around the legs. They look weird, and remind me of sausages. On top of that, they have the EXACT SAME texture and look as the legs on the Barapasaurus, which indicates that this model may have been digitally sculpted and they simply reused aspects from the other one to save time and money.



When it comes to scientific accuracy, Schleich can at least be praised for their attempt to get the feet right again. The front feet only have one claw each as opposed to the elephantine feet of the WoH model, But this also stems from the fact that the feet are made the same exact way as those found of the Barapasaurus. The first issue that I found on this model is that they based it off the proportions of Giraffatitan brancai instead of an actual Brachiosaurus altithorax. Also, the nostril openings are in the wrong spot again, up by the crest when they should be lower towards the front of the snout. The only things that make this model in tune with modern reconstructions of Brachiosaurus is that the neck is held out in front instead of being held upwards like a periscope.

In terms of detailing, only the top half of the model is decked out with really big scales (which would be a lot smaller on the real animal) while the rest of it is features nothing but very minimal wrinkles. It’s almost like the model was supposed to be covered with the scales, but the sculptor was either running out of time, or simply did not care to finish the job and so Schleich ran with it because they wanted to save time and money. At around 14 inches long, this model would be around 1:64 Scale, making it around the same scale as your average run of the Mill Toy Car by Mattel. The colours on this model are simply different shades of green. The base is light green while the scales are dark green with some traces of light green painted on them. The eyes are orange and the teeth are all painted white, with a red tongue sculpted inside the mouth. The claws are black and the bottom of the figure is painted in a greenish beige.

Overall, I can’t speak for everyone, when I tell you all that i actually like this model. It looks a lot better then the WoH version, but that’s not saying much, as that model was looks very ugly by comparison to this. I would also like to note that, despite the weird-looking legs, this new version looks a lot more convincing as a real member of the brachiosaur family then the WoH one ever did, but I’m sure it will never live up to the very first one they made for the Replicasaurus line back in 1997, or the 2008 remake. As usual, if you want this model, you can find it (almost) anywhere Schleich dinosaurs are sold.

Mighty Dinosaurs (Creator by Lego)

“Season’s Greetings, fellow dinosaur lovers! Yes, it is I, Dr. Bella Bricking, enjoying another holiday season! And where would I be without my trusty and beloved companion, Beth Buildit?”

“I can’t believe I let you talk me into wearing this hat, Doc.”

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“Now, now, no humbugs, Beth! We’ve got a big job ahead of us! Today we’ll be reviewing Lego Creator set 31058, Mighty Dinosaurs! New for 2017, this 174 piece set is quite similar to Prehistoric Hunters in that it contains instructions for three different builds! Ready, Beth?”

“Sure. Let’s jingle bell rock, Doc.”

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“As you can see, this set contains pieces in medium green, dark green, beige, light grey, dark grey, black, and white. There are also some translucent orange pieces used as eyes, a couple of red Technic pins, and three dark red pieces. Ready for the next one, Beth!”

“Coming, coming.”

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“And here’s our first build! Lego refers to it as a “Pterodactyl,” but you and I both know full well that that’s an all too common misnomer, Beth! No, my paleontological training tells me that this is that most famous of pterosaurs, Pteranodon!”

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“And not just any old Pteranodon, Doc! Check out how small that head crest is! I don’t know if Lego intended this or not, but I think we have the first ever female Pteranodon toy! Sweet!”

“Indeed, Beth, how delightful! Now, from the tip of its bill to the end of its tail, this Pteranodon measures 18.5 cm long and its wingspan is 26 cm. Now, being a relatively simple Lego build, it would be wrong to say that this is a scientifically accurate animal. The wings are too short and the blocky legs end in enormous talons. As well, the Pteranodon‘s hands have claws sticking out at both ends!”

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“That’s due to the nature of Creator sets, Doc. Lots of pieces end up doing double or triple duty. Just look at how poseable our girl is! Her neck, legs, and tail are ball-jointed and each of her wings has two ball joints and a hinge joint. She can be put in a wide variety of walking or flying poses. Definitely a fun toy!”

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“I concur, Beth! Very well, let’s dismantle this Pteranodon and begin our next build!”

*sigh* “We’re gonna need a good long rest after this review!”

“Careful where you step, Beth!”

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“And there it is, Doc. Our second build is a Triceratops!”

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“Unmistakably so, Beth. This blocky representation of the iconic three-horned lizard measures 19 cm long with its tail fully extended. Like the Pteranodon, it boasts impressive articulation, with ball joints at the head, shoulders, hips, and two sections of the tail. The horns are large and intimidating. And how nice that the frill features epoccipitals!”

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“Brow horns aren’t quite right though, Doc. In real life, they’d be curving in the other direction. You can rotate these horn pieces around, but it doesn’t look very good.”

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“That’s true, Beth, but as an alternative solution, you could conceive of this as a juvenile specimen, still in the process of growing its horns. Now then, take one last look at the Triceratops before we move on to our third build.”

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“Hey Doc, have you noticed how I seem to be doing all the heavy lifting during these builds?”

“And you do it wonderfully, my dear Beth. Now, if you’re finished with that tail, please fetch me another one of these tooth pieces.”

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“Check out this Tyrannosaurus rex, folks! This bad boy has the most steps and uses all 175 pieces in the set. From nose to tail tip, it measures 27 cm long and stands around 10 cm tall at the hips. And it comes with part of a large rib cage. Must’ve been a good meal.”

“What a ferocious-looking theropod, Beth! It features a mouth full of sharp teeth, curved claws on its hands and feet, and is relatively streamlined for a brick-built Lego dinosaur. Granted, its arms are too large and the hind claws ought to be smaller and less blade-like, but everyone from the youngest enthusiast to the most esteemed paleontologists like myself can immediately recognize this as the tyrant lizard. Oh, and it features forward-facing eyes and non-pronated wrists!”

“And again, Doc, the articulation on this toy rocks. The head, shoulders, hips, feet, and first two sections of tail are ball-jointed and the lower jaw, neck, wrists, tail tip, and middle toes are hinged. The mouth can open extremely wide and the stiff hinged toes give good stability to action poses. Oh, and check this out! If you’ve got some extra slope pieces, you can give this T. rex some feathers!”

My, my, how very creative, Beth! But I’m afraid it’s time once again to dismantle this build and start anew!”

“Come again, Doc? You said at the start that this set only comes with instructions for three builds!”

“Ah, but Lego has graciously provided the instructions for a fourth build on their website! Come, come, let’s see what it is!”

“Huh, how about that? Looks like a Brachiosaurus to me, Doc. Well okay, it’s generic to the point where it could pass for a lot of long necks, but Brachiosaurus is still the big star in the public’s mind, so I’m gonna stick with that.”

“I agree with your hypothesis, Beth. Like the Triceratops, this sauropod is possibly just a youngster, as it’s relatively small. Still, it can raise its head to a height of slightly more than 14 cm or stretch itself out to a length of 26 cm.”

“Sure is well articulated, Doc! The head and neck have two ball joints and a hinge joint, the tail has two ball joints, and there are ball joints at the shoulders and hips. And granted, the eyes stick out on either side and the feet are blocky, but overall, this little fellow still looks pretty organic and fluid for a Legosaur.”

“Fine observations, Beth. Now tell me, how do you think Mighty Dinosaurs compares to Prehistoric Hunters?”

“Well, Lego’s constantly churning out new pieces and coming up with new building techniques, so Mighty Dinosaurs definitely beats out its 2012 predecessor. All four builds look smoother and less blocky. And while the Triceratops is kinda limited in terms of poses, the Pteranodon, the T. rex, and the Brachiosaurus have awesome articulation that makes them a ton of fun to play with. Bottom line, they’re both great kits that many dinosaur fans and any Lego fan would love. Prehistoric Hunters has long been retired, but Mighty Dinosaurs is brand spanking new, retails for only $17.99 Canadian, and available in toy stores everywhere. And don’t forget that you can always ditch the instructions and come up with your own creations! A great Christmas gift, folks!”

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“And on that note, fellow dinosaur lovers, Beth and I wish you the happiest of holidays and all the best for 2017. Be brave, be strong, be active, be true, and above all else, be kind. Thank you.”

“Here’s to that, Doc. Be awesome to each other and party on!”