Tag Archives: dilophosaurus

Dilophosaurus (Nature World by Boley)

Review and photos by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

Dilophosaurus has become very well known as a result of its appearance in Jurassic Park, where it approaches the would-be burglar Dennis Nedry in a friendly manner, but then becomes angry and spits venom at him, much like a modern cobra. The real Dilophosaurus, of course, is not known to have possessed a frill or venom. Nevertheless, in response to the more common knowledge of Dilophosaurus, a number of toy companies have begun to produce models of this dinosaur.

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Boley is a lesser-known company that produces a line called Nature World, which includes dinosaurs. Their dinosaur line features Dilophosaurus, of which they have produced a decent model. The Boley figure is eight inches long and five inches tall. It reproduces the semicircular double crests that distinguish this dinosaur nicely, with a reddish-pink accent around their outlines. The detail of the scales is also very nice, and the animal accurately possesses narrow jaws with a slight dimple in the upper jaw toward the nose. The neck is longer than those of other theropods, much like Allosaurus. The toy also accurately portrays the hands as having three fingers. The neck is nice and long for a Dilophosaurus, although it is a bit thick. The figure does strike a tripod pose, which is often decried by connoisseurs for scientific accuracy, but it is possible that some theropods may have lowered their tails somewhat when standing still and rearing up. Thus, this dinosaur is probably not walking, but standing tall. Perhaps it is roaring at an Anchisaurus it had been watching in the distance. The hunt is afoot!

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The plastic has a nice consistency. It is flexible, pleasant to touch, and light, which is attractive considering that some dinosaur toys are very hard and heavy. It almost has a slight, rubber-like consistency. This is good, as very hard plastic toys with very small or narrow parts may break. Safety fanatics may try to scare you with all the horrible phthalates that could be hiding in the toy, but since the toy is sold in the US, it must be phthalate-free, as they are banned in children’s toys sold in the US. So, parents may let their children play with this Dilophosaurus without fear. Also, unlike some cheap toy dinosaurs, the name of the dinosaur is printed on the stomach to prevent any confusion.

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The only negative thing I might say about this figure is that it portrays the Dilophosaurus’ body and hind legs as being somewhat more heavyset than they probably were in life. The skeleton of Dilophosaurus appears to be very lightly built and gracile. This is an understandable oversight, however, because many of the better-known theropods were much more heavily built.

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Overall, I would rate this toy with at least four stars; maybe even five. For only having one small inaccuracy that I can detect, I peg it as a decent figure for dinosaur collectors who may not be able to afford large quantities of the more expensive name-brand models. Dilophosaurus is one of my favourite dinosaurs, as it reminds me of playing a DK computer game called Dinosaur Hunter 2.0, where you could go hunting for dinosaur bones and reassemble skeletons to clone six dinosaur types. My favourite one to clone was Dilophosaurus, so I couldn’t resist this toy when I saw it. Plus, I like Jurassic dinosaurs. This figure may be more difficult to find online than the big name brands, but you may find it as part of a set. Or if you’d like to save money and improve your chances, Wal-Mart carries them for a very good price. You may even get one for a dollar!

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Dilophosaurus with Pteranodon (Jurassic World Hero Mashers by Hasbro)

For my fifth and final Hero Mashers review, I’ll be looking at two very familiar faces from the JP franchise: Dilophosaurus and Pteranodon.

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The Dilophosaurus is made up of twelve pieces. Once assembled, the carnivore measures about 24 cm long. Cyan blue is the main colour with dark blue markings, swamp green for the twin crests and claws, yellow eyes, white teeth, and a pink mouth. A JW logo is printed on one side of the body.

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The Dilophosaurus boasts a hinged lower jaw and universal joints at the neck, shoulders, hips, knees, and both sections of tail. As you can see, it is decked out in the distance JP-style neck frill that has no basis in reality whatsoever. The markings on it do look kind of cool though. Fortunately, you can always remove the frill pieces if they’re not your cup of tea. And it makes the toy much less front-heavy.

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While unmistakeable as a Dilophosaurus, this toy is like all other HM figures: very cartoonish with oversized feet. It is worth noting, however, that the sculptor put four digits on each hand—although it’s very possible that the fourth one was vestigial and hidden under skin.

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The packaging describes the secondary beast as a “Pterodactyl,” but I’m just going to go right ahead and ignore that tiresome misnomer. This is clearly intended to be Pteranodon. There are eight pieces, giving this set the most pieces out of all the Deluxes.

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The main colour is light grey with bright green markings, dark blue claws, orange eyes, white teeth, and a pink mouth. I guess with those teeth, one could also conceive of this as a Ludodactylus. The lower jaw is hinged and the wingspan is a good 28 cm.

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Unfortunately, even for a HM, this is a rather bad-looking beast. It would have been way nicer if the wings attached to the forearms instead of the upper arms. There’s really no way to make them look better. A smaller, skinnier body would also probably help, and there actually is a grey Velociraptor kit available.

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As with all the Hero Mashers sets I’ve reviewed over the last few months, this one is clearly intended for young dinosaur fans first and foremost. It’s definitely got the fun-to-fiddle-with factor going for it, and the Dilophosaurus is decent enough, but the Pteranodon is admittedly ugly and ungainly. I reckon I’ll eventually either pass all these on to the next generation or donate them to a school or a daycare centre.

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Dilophosaurus (The First Giants by Schleich)

Review and photographs by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Dilophosaurus has been a staple dinosaur ever since it appeared in a certain 20-year old movie that many companies like to pander to. Despite the inaccurate appearance in that movie, most companies base their Dilophosaurus on the real thing to an extent, making sure that their models lack a extendable frill. Sometimes they get the anatomy wrong by putting two crests on a generic theropod head, or omitting important details such as a tooth notch. The company we know as Schleich has created two Dilophosaurus toys in their lifetime.

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The first one was made for their Junior line of dinosaurs, which were made to be cheaper models than the larger Replicasaurus models being sold at the time. That Dilophosaurus, however, was one of a couple animals in the junior line that did not have a counterpart in the Replicasaurus line. So when I heard that Schleich was going to make a new one for their World of History line of figures, I was stoked to say the least.

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This Dilophosaurus is not one of their best models. It is a lot better than the Junior version, but that is not saying much, as the company has come a long way in terms of detail in these figures. In terms of accuracy, this model is very flawed, The legs are a little too beefy for the species, and the hands are pronated. On top of that, the skull is too short and a lot more robust than that of the real creature, with the lower jaw appearing to be particularly beefy when viewed from the front. Another issue this figure has is that the hands are lacking a couple of digits.

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Despite these obvious flaws, there are some points to be given to this figure. The mouth does have the animal’s signature tooth notch, and the body seems very gracile apart from the over-sized legs. In terms of detail, this model is like a Chap Mei figure without the sounds and screw holes. The body is decked with large scales and the back has a row of spikes that go up and in between the crests and around the lower jaw. The colours on this figure are not for everyone. The base color is blue-green and the top color is bright blue. The spikes are red, the claws are grey, the teeth are white, and the tongue is pink.

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Overall, this is another figure that will divide tastes. It is not as fine as their Kentrosaurus, but it’s nowhere near as bad as the Replicasaurus Ceratosaurus. To me, it’s as charming as the rest of the World of History figures, and I’ve been waiting for Schleich to release this species for the WoH collection since its inception in 2012. If you like accurate models, then this one is not for you. It was made as a collectible kids’ toy, and there are better models of the genus on the market (like the Papo model). If you do want one, you can get it anywhere that sells Schleich as well as Ebay and (eventually) Amazon.

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