Tag Archives: Spinosaurus

Spinosaurus (Small)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Today’s review is of the Recur Spinosaurus released back in 2015 (according to the year printed on the belly). As a modern take on the species, this model is a pretty decent replica, and a stark contrast to the Tyrannosaurus I recently reviewed from the same line.

​One thing that’s obvious is the fact that this toy was made with longer hind legs like most reconstructions prior to 2014. Despite this, it is sculpted with its arm acting as a third leg, just like the Papo Acrocanthosaurus. Unlike that toy, the arm on this one is propping it up high enough to give us the classic horizontal theropod impression, and it gives off a somewhat imposing look. In terms of accuracy, this model could be decent for a pre-2014 model if it were not for the head, which shows traces of the Spinosaurus that appeared in Jurassic Park 3. These include a head that is clearly too broad, a pair of crests, and the lack of a tooth notch. The other issues with this figure include the fact that the feet are too big and the legs are too long. Of course, there has been ongoing controversy over the the 2014 Ibrahim/Sereno reconstruction, so I’m willing to let this slide for now. One thing that I have to praise the toy for is the fact that Recur gave it the large fish hook claws that the spinosaurid family are known for. Though being a toy, the claws have blunted tips to prevent its target audience from getting hurt. Like all Recur toys, this Spinosaurus is made out of a soft and squishy PVC material and there is likely cotton inside of it. The only hard parts on this model are the arms, which are made out of a incredibly stiff plastic. Which is good, because if the arms were not this hard, the toy would have no way of standing, because the hind legs are very pliable.

​In terms of detail, the model is decked with wrinkles, but there are small osteoderms at the base of the sail that run up about halfway down the tail before they stop. Along the top of the tail, there are larger osteoderms than those found along the base of the sail, and almost look like they would be spiky if it were not for the fact that this was a toy made for kids. On the back of the neck, there is a set of completely different integument in the form of crocodile-like armour. Why Recur decided to do this is beyond me. Perhaps this was meant to go down the entire length of the back, but they scrapped it instead. It would not be the first time a company took the crocodilian look of spinosaurs to the extreme.

The colours on this toy are very dull at first glance, but if you look closely, you can see more variety. The majority of the Spinosaurus is painted in grey, but the armour on the neck is painted green and the tops of the neural spines alternate between green and blue, giving it a nice pattern when viewed in the right lighting. The teeth are painted in a dull white and the tongue and mouth interior are painted purple.

Overall, this makes for a excellent toy, but a only decent replica of Spinosaurus. It really was not made to be included among the likes of CollectA or Safari figures, and it is aimed at a much younger age group than most other toys we review on this blog. The soft materials make it ideal for very rough play should you (or your child) wish it to clash with other dinosaur toys. As of now, the only place you can find it at is DeJankins, which just got its replenishment orders in as of the time of this writing.

Spinosaurus (Jurassic Hunters by Geoworld)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

Time for another Geoworld review. This time, it’s their take on the infamous Spinosaurus. Spinosaurus, as many of you know, has proven to be a conundrum for scientists. Everyone has been arguing over what the animal looked like because of a paper published in 2014 that ultimately altered the way we generally depict this creature. That being said, the subject of today’s review was a figure that was made a year before the paper was published, so we all know that it will not have the short legs that many restorations have been trying to incorporate in this day and age. Unfortunately, rather than take after the fossils known at the time, Geoworld opted to rip off the one from Jurassic Park 3 instead, giving us a highly inaccurate version of the animal.

​To start things off, I wish to talk about the head. To put it bluntly, it is way too robust. We all know what the skull of Spinosaurus looks like by now, but Geoworld opted to ignore it in favour of making their model look more like the one that appeared in JP3. To be fair, they did get the tooth notch in the upper jaw, but that’s about as far as it goes. As for the rest of the model, it’s your very typical theropod body. The legs are long, the high sail is made of skin and bone as opposed to being a hump, and the arms are nice and long. About the only things that’s missing are the fish hook foreclaws that spinosaurs are known for.

​Due to a request from an member on the Dinosaur Toy Forum, I will be including scans of the cards that come with these figures from now on. As you can see, the artwork on the card includes an image of a black Spinosaurus whose origins I cannot identify (if you recognize the source of the drawing, then please say so in a comment). There is also a little image of artist Raul Lunia’s Spinosaurus in the lower right hand corner which, thankfully, is public domain. The back of the card has information regarding Spinosaurus that many of us are well aware of, however, I can’t help but wonder if the grammar could be a little off due to the fact that these products were designed in Italy and the translation process was messed up. Also, in the upper left hand corner of the sheet, you can see an image whose origin I cannot determine. Once again, if you know who the original artist is, please say so in the comments.


The colours on this figure are pretty bright for a dinosaur toy. The main colour is orange with a light yellow line going down the length of the figure’s underside. The sail is blue in the middle and light yellow at the top, while the teeth are white and the claws are black. In terms of detailing, there is not much to talk about. The figure is decked out with a buck of large bumps that I assume are supposed to be osteoderms, but other than that, it just has wrinkles on the majority of its body. The Spinosaurus is posed in a fashion that’s become something of a cliche for theropod figures, with the tail raised in the air and the front half of the body lowered to the ground.

Overall, the Geoworld Spinosaurus not worth your money in the end, as I’m sure that most toys coming out in this day and age can blow it out of the water.

Spinosaurus (Unknown Company)

Review and photographs by Rajvinder “IrritatorRaji” Phull, edited by Suspsy

Behold Spinosaurus, a ‘marmite’ animal among dinosaur enthusiasts. Love it or hate it, you can’t deny how fascinating this beast is. It’s a creature still shrouded in mystery, much like the statue we’ll be looking at today. I’m not really sure what company produced this statue; all I can say is that I picked it up at the Kents Caverns gift shop in Devon, England. I’ve not found any information or images of this statue online, and statues that appear to be of the same style offer contradictory information about their origin.

Remember what I said about ‘marmite’? Well, that may be one’s interpretation of this statue as well. This model appears to be an older sculpt, perhaps early to mid-2000s’ when public perceptions of Spinosaurus were still being shaped by Jurassic Park 3. The posing on this figure is typical for the ferocious ‘rex killing’ monster that Spinosaurus was portrayed as. Mouth open with teeth on display, muscular arms baring flesh-tearing claws carelessly hanging, and walking among the bones of the fallen.

Measuring at 40 cm (15.7 inches) long and 25 cm (9.8 inches) tall, this is a decent-sized model. Inaccuracies aside, the sculpt is quite nice. The scales are individually sculpted with a life-like texture. Skin folds are also found throughout the model. The muscles aren’t too well sculpted, but in few places, such as the legs, there seems to be some evidence of musculature. The facial details are symmetrical. The teeth in the lower jaw are also individually sculpted and are also sharp. The same can’t be said for the teeth in the upper jaw, which are, in all honesty, slightly pathetic. While there are some teeth, they are found on the right side of the jaw only, and they take the form of random bumps. The left side of the upper jaw is devoid of teeth, save for a ridge that makes it look as if the sculpt is unfinished.

Part of this model’s sculpt did surprise me. A cloacal opening and non-pronated hands are unexpected on an otherwise very scientifically inaccurate model, but are welcome nonetheless. The sculpting on the hands and feet are good, featuring large and broad scales that give the hands and feet a bird-like appearance. The signature crest of Spinosaurus is also present.

The base is also interesting, but a little lacklustre. It’s littered with the rib bones of some long deceased (or recently eaten) dinosaur, a far cry from the river setting that Spinosaurus is often associated with. Personally, I welcome this base. I imagine that Spinosaurus would definitely wander further inland during dry seasons or drought. The base does allow one to question the circumstances that led this Spinosaurus so far from home. My only wish for the base is that it had more detail. While you can make out some rocks, the terrain this Spinosaurus is wandering through isn’t very clear. I’d say it’s desert, yet tall, healthy plants are present. I’d say marsh, but the Spinosaurus doesn’t seem to be sinking into the ground, and the sides of the base look very rock-like.

Now it’s time to list the flaws, of which there are MANY. First of all, no, that is not a camera trick, the tail really is that short. In reality, it would be incapable of balancing the animal, meaning it’d probably be falling forward onto those oversized hands all the time. The legs are also incredibly long, even if you’re comparing them to JP3’s Spinosaurus. The hands lack the enlarged killing claws that would have been used to fish. The torso section of the Spinosaurus is very robust; this guy (or gal?) has massive hips. The face and neck are incredibly shrink-wrapped and lack any sort of muscle definition. The neck itself is also very long, thin, and serpent-like, forming an ‘S’ curve that I’m not sure Spinosaurus was capable of achieving. The face is also quite rounded, short, and small, as opposed to long and narrow. A tooth notch is somewhat present, but it’s so subtly sculpted that it’s very difficult to see. The teeth, as mentioned before, are appalling and fail to represent not just spinosaur teeth but theropod teeth as a whole. The eyes are also incredibly large and the interior of the mouth isn’t sculpted at all.

Final verdict: this is not a statue that those who care for scientific accuracy. It’s nowhere near as bad as other dinosaur models, such as early Schleichs, but it’s no Sideshow Collectable either. Dinosaur model collectors may also have a hard time fitting this one in their collection. Those who like or appreciate vintage models may take a liking to this figure. However, to obtain one, you’d need to want it very badly, given that I couldn’t find any information (or even evidence of existence) about this figure online.