Tag Archives: Stegosaurus

Stegosaurus (Version 1)(Recur)

Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy

When it comes to dinosaur toy lines, Stegosaurus is almost always a necessity. So when Recur first created their line of soft toys for kids, they were sure to include the plated lizard. There are currently two different versions to choose from and today I will be reviewing the first one, made back in 2015.



This Stegosaurus is sculpted in an interesting stance, with its hind legs planted firmly on the ground and one of its front feet slightly raised up. Unfortunately, this pose is not an original idea, as one glance at this image from the Jurassic World website should be enough to show you where the inspiration came from. Indeed, one can argue that Jurassic World has been a major influence in the creation of a few of their models. It’s similar to how the films influenced Papo’s models as well.



In terms of accuracy, this model is not going to win any awards. The feet are all elephantine and the plates are too small. Other issues include the fact that there’s too much space in the middle of the back, and that the thagomizer spikes are pointed out to the sides when they should be pointed backwards. Finally, the head is too big and lacks the animal’s signature throat armour.

So how well does this Stegosaurus stand up to being a toy? Well, like all Recur models, it is made out of a soft PVC plastic filled with cotton on the inside. It can clearly be bashed around while still retaining its shape. I know this because I actually had this toy inside a tote with other ones made out of a harder material, and the only parts that were damaged on it was the paint on the face and plates. Speaking of the paint, the colours are a assortment of different shades of green (that I will have a hard time describing to you), while the beak and claws are painted black.

At around 11 and a half inches, this dinosaur is way too big to be in 1:40 Scale, but like all Recur items, it was designed to be a toy first and foremost, made to withstand the toughest play possible while still retaining its shape, and keeping kids safe from getting their eyes poked out. That being said, if you’re a stickler for accuracy, then it’s best to wait for a model that matches that of Scott Hartman’s current skeletal diagram. But if you’re a collector of stegosaurs or just want a nice, safe, and durable toy for your child, then this is a must-have. Right now, you can buy it at DeJankins, who just got their Recur stock replenished due to high demand, and Amazon.com.

Stegosaurus (Smithsonian Institution by Tyco)

A Stegosaurus is definitely a classic,

as it hailed from the Jurassic.

It had large plates and spikes on its tail,

though it trudged as fast as a snail.

Meet the Smithsonian Stegosaurus toy from TYCO,

this is one toy you don’t want to let go.

The Dino Riders Stegosaurus had armor and could walk,

the Smithsonian version had none, just plates like a mohawk.

Finding room on a shelf might be a chore,

as its scale is 1:24.

At 6.5 in (16.5 cm) high and 10.8 in (27.4 cm) long,

it would look good standing next to King Kong.

The main color is green with red that has been brushed.

I guess this Stegosaur must be excited as it plates are blushed.

Oh those beaded eyes with their lifelike gleam,

wink at you as you start to dream.

Depictions of Dinosaurs from a childhood we adored

lead to scientific accuracy that we occasionally have ignored.

Its tail is dragging and its legs are splayed,

but its from the 80’s and that’s how it was made.

Yes this toy is quite archaic,

but for me Stegosaurus is Ptolemaic.

Its tiny little head had a beak that chops,

it looks as cute as an Avaceratops.

Long time gone from the shops it is,

so off to E-bay as that’s the biz.

To me its beautiful so I fully recommend,

as its worth the money you will spend.

Stegosaurus (Mini)(Skeleflex by Wild Planet)

Despite its immense fame and popularity, there are not very many complete specimens of Stegosaurus. Most of the skeletons you see in museums are actually composites of multiple animals. The most intact one is currently “Sophie,” a young adult that resides in the Natural History Museum in London, U.K. It is about 85% complete and looks magnificent. But as you’ll see, the subject of today’s review is quite the antithesis of “Sophie.”

The Skeleflex Mini Stegosaurus kit is made up of fourteen army green pieces. The main part of the skeleton is rubberized plastic; the rest are hard plastic. They all snap together via ball joints save for the peg-on thagomizer.

Once assembled, the Stegosaurus measures 16.5 cm long and stands 10 cm tall due to the large plates on its back. It holds together quite well and is articulated at the head, jaw, shoulders, hips, wrists, ankles, and tail. The sculpting is reasonably good and the plates in particular have an interesting bumpy texture to them.

But as you can clearly see from these photos, this Stegosaurus makes the T. rex I reviewed last time look like the very pinnacle of scientific accuracy by comparison. This is a hideous monster, plain and simple. Its head is oversized and equipped with sharp, triangular teeth. It has too few vertebrae. It has a single row of skinny, dagger-shaped plates. And most noticeably of all, it has ridiculously humongous feet. It’s anyone’s guess how a freak like this would be able to lift its feet high enough to walk.

Like all Skeleflex kits, the Stegosaurus‘ pieces can be swapped out to create any number of monstrous creatures. Although honestly, I find its default form plenty frightening already!

So that’s the Skeleflex Mini Stegosaurus for you. If you’re in the market for painstakingly detailed and accurate prehistoric renditions, then for goodness sakes, skip this kit and buy yourself a nice CollectA or Safari toy. But if you enjoy a little bit of weird fun now and then, look no further!