Tag Archives: Woolly mammoth

Mammoth Skeleton Tent with Cavemen (Playmobil)

As storm clouds gather overhead, a trio of human hunters work quickly to finish erecting their shelter. Fortunately, the mammoth that they recently killed and butchered has provided far more than just food. Its large, sturdy bones form an effective structure while its thick fur hide acts as a waterproof covering. As the hunters settle down inside their new dwelling, they are joined by the fourth member of their party: a faithful tracking wolf that they have raised from a pup.

It’s been quite a while since I last wrote a Playmobil review. Today I’ll be presenting a very interesting set from the 2011 Stone Age series: the Mammoth Skeleton Tent with Cavemen. We’ll begin with the bare bones, if you’ll pardon the pun. The aforementioned skeleton consists of nine pieces, all them coloured pale grey save for the white tusks. Most of the pieces are made of hard plastic, but the tusks and tail are made from softer, flexible material to ensure safety and prevent breakage. Once assembled, the skeleton holds together very firmly. And I mean very firmly. Granted, the limbs can be removed with relative ease (they’re supposed to, as you’ll see in due course), but the skull and tail are practically sealed in place.


From the tip of the tusks to the rump, this skeleton measures 20 cm long and stands about 13.5 cm tall. The head, shoulders, hips, and tail all rotate, making it reasonably poseable. And while this skeleton is admittedly lacking a mandible and some vertebrae, it’s still unmistakeable as a specimen of Mammuthus primigenius. Pretty impressive for a children’s toy. Interestingly, while the “living” Playmobil mammoth has a larger head and tusks, the skeleton has a higher back and is wider at the shoulders.


Here are the three cavemen who come with the set. I call them Charles, John, and Mauricio. As you can see, they have the same dark hair, tanned skin, and fashion style as the two that came with the sabretooth set, indicating that they’re all part of the same tribe. Charles is decked out in an impressive bison headdress and cloak, suggesting that he’s the leader of this merry band. Their accessories consist of a jagged-tip spear, an axe, and a broken femur bone. Perhaps that last one is for their canid companion.

And here he/she is, a light brown wolf measuring slightly under 8 cm long. It’s generic-looking enough that it could pass for either an extinct Canis dirus or an extant Canis lupus. Its detailing is simple, in keeping with the Playmobil aesthetic, but it does have sculpted fur on its head, limbs, and tail. It is also jointed at the neck, shoulders, and hips, making it a fun little figure to play with. It’s just a shame that the eyes and nose aren’t painted.


Here we have a large, dark brown mammoth pelt moulded in the shape of a tent and made out of rubbery, flexible plastic.

And here’s the main section of the set, a large base plate sculpted to look like rocks and sand, complete with a dead shrub, a live fern, and a blazing campfire.

To assemble the tent, you first need to remove the limbs from the skeleton. Attach the main section to the underside of the pelt, attach the hind limbs to the entrance way, then peg the whole thing into the base plate. The resulting structure is big enough for all three cavemen and their wolf to shelter under. Of course, real mammoth dwellings were considerably more complex, but again, this works very well indeed for a children’s toy.

Overall, the Playmobil Mammoth Skeleton Tent is a really fun and educational set that any young prehistoric fan should enjoy. Not to mention a lot of older ones. As I’ve mentioned in my previous reviews, the Stone Age series was discontinued back at the end of 2011, but you may still be able to find it online.

Woolly Mammoth (Mini Cuddlekin by Wild Republic)

Review and photo by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

Meet Ellie, the favourite of favourites in my whole dinosaur collection! I was so inspired by her that I even draw a cartoon called “Skinny and Ellie,” featuring a caricature of her. Ellie is a Wild Republic woolly mammoth, also known as a Cuddlekin. But she is also part of the Mini Cuddlekin family; being only eight inches long and about five inches tall, making her perfect for travel.

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The pattern of her fur is also beautiful, with a soft, reddish-brown, felt-like material composing her face, trunk, mouth, legs, rump, and tail. It is very possible that mammoths’ hair was shorter in these areas.

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Ellie’s cranium tuft and the areas around her hump, shoulders, and stomach are made of longer, dark-brown plush. Mammoths had longer hair on the top of their heads and on their bodies, so that is also nicely accurate. Other nice details are the black nostrils stitched in her pink trunk tip and her open mouth, also made of the same pink material. Black hairs crown the tip of her tail as well. I also really admire that the white tusks grow out of brown tusk sockets attached to the sides of her face, rather than just being stitched directly to her face. This detail is overlooked in a number of stuffed woolly mammoths and elephants.

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Ellie is, without any doubt, a five star toy in my mind. She is beautifully artistic in her construction and as appropriate for any mammoth-loving child as for an adult mammoth lover who likes to travel with a little friend, like me. She is easy to find in museum gift shops or online at Stuffedsafari.com, Amazon, or eBay, where I got mine.

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Woolly Mammoth (Douglas Cuddle Toys)

Review and photographs by Bryan Divers, edited by Suspsy

Another treasured item in my collection is Cynthia, a unique and truly adorable stuffed woolly mammoth toy by Douglas Cuddle Toys. She is around 8 inches long and stands approximately 5 inches tall.

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First of all, I’d like to say that I think the workmanship on this woolly mammoth is superb. It is so accurate, in fact, that the Chicago Field Museum store carried it for a number of years. It is very similar in shape to the Safari Ltd woolly mammoth figure if you compare the two, despite the obvious difference of one being plastic and the other being a soft toy. The sculpt of the trunk, tusks and head are all very attentive to detail and the back has a nice slope to it. Her eyes have a very endearing expression as well. The ears are small, just like a mammoth’s should be. The fur is also a beautiful reddish-brown colour, which again is very fitting for a woolly mammoth toy. I personally like reddish-brown, henna-haired woolly mammoths, so this piece is one of my favourites.

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Some other nice details that Cynthia has and that are often overlooked in other woolly mammoth stuffed animals are the toenails and the tuft on the end of her tail. I would have to say that this little mammoth makes an excellent companion and is an affordable yet realistic toy for woolly mammoth aficionados of all ages! She is available on Walmart.com, stuffedsafari.com, Amazon, and eBay if you search for “Douglas Mammoth.”

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