Classification: Tyrannosaur

Carnivorous Dinos (Toob by Safari Ltd.)

2.9 (21 votes)
When it comes to tubes of miniatures, or “toobs,” Safari Ltd. remains the undisputed ruler. That said, they haven’t released any new toobs in years, and many of their prehistoric-themed ones are really showing their age. Today we’ll be examining one such example, Carnivorous Dinos, consisting of twelve miniatures representing a veritable Who’s Who of Mesozoic (and one Paleozoic) Meanies.

Carnotaurus Gyrosphere Escape (Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom by LEGO)

3.2 (6 votes)

Review by James Hirleley, photos by Roselaar, edited by Suspsy

Dinosaurs roamed the earth once again this past June in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Following suit, LEGO released a wave of sets to commemorate the latest blockbuster movie from the dinosaur-themed franchise. The Carnotaurus Gyrosphere Escape (75929) set boasts 577 pieces, which makes it one of the largest sets from the LEGO Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom lineup.

Cretaceous Collection (Kaiyodo Capsule Q Museum)

4.3 (4 votes)
Review and photos by Patryx
Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, Velociraptor, Mosasaurus, and Pteranodon. What a familiar lineup! This is a set decidedly influenced by the hype surrounding the latest installment in the Jurassic Park franchise, consisting of five iconic creatures from all over the Cretaceous. It’s an intriguing concept, as Kaiyodo is revered for their up-to-date reconstructions, and Jurassic Park is, well, not.

Daspletosaurus (CollectA)

3.3 (11 votes)
One of my favourite activities as a child was seeing the dinosaur skeletons at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, Ontario. And my favourite one was the Daspletosaurus, due to the fact that it so closely resembled Tyrannosaurus rex.

Tyrannosaurs and other theropods were likely similar to modern carnivores in that they spent much of their time not hunting and fighting and killing, but resting peacefully.

Daspletosaurus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.5 (24 votes)

Every fall, Safari Ltd announces their releases for the upcoming year. Understandably, probably owing to the pandemic and the attendant slowdown in trade, their announcements for 2021 were pretty limited, only three new items in the core dinosaur range. I confess I was a bit disappointed that all three were theropods, not being a particular fan of the clade (or at least not of the apex predators in the clade).

Dilophosaurus Rex (Jurassic World Hybrids by Hasbro)

1.2 (18 votes)
Review and photos by Takama, edited by Suspsy
When you read the title of this review, what do you expect to see? If you’re expecting some sort of new species of Dilophosaurus, then you’re giving the minds at Hasbro way too much credit. In reality, it’s a retool of their Bashers and Biters T.

Dino Skulls (Toob by Safari Ltd.)

4.7 (20 votes)
From the savage teeth of tyrannosaurs to the intimidating horns of ceratopsians to the endearing crests of hadrosaurs and to the peculiar noggins of pachycephalosaurs, dinosaur skulls truly are stupendous. I previously reviewed Safari’s toob of prehistoric mammal skulls; now I’ll be looking at their Dino Skulls toob.

Dino Trackers Minis (Jurassic World by Mattel)

Group shot.

4 (14 votes)

Review and photos by Faelrin, edited by Suspsy

Being a heavy collector of the Mattel Jurassic World line, it’s not often I give attention to their fantastic line of minis despite having collected a good portion of them ever since the line’s launch in 2018. In fact, this is probably my first review of these particular types of figures.

Dinos (Toob by Safari Ltd.)

3.5 (11 votes)
Safari’s very first prehistory toob is charming, but largely showing its age in the details and aesthetics of the figurines.
Toobs might be the unsung heroes of Safari Ltd.’s toy lines. I see them wherever Safari products are sold, even when their larger, standard-sized kin are absent.

Dinosaur Advent Calendar 2016 (Schleich)

3.8 (6 votes)
Review and photos by Tim Sosa
This year Schleich followed in the footsteps of companies like Lego and Playmobil in offering an advent calendar, but this one is dinosaur-themed! 24 days of dinosaur goodies sounds pretty attractive, so I bit the bullet and picked one up. I opened it long before Christmas, so that maybe this review can help you decide whether to buy one yourself.

Dinosaur Advent Calendar 2020 (Schleich)

3.3 (8 votes)

Well, the holiday season is nearly upon us. No matter what this time means to you and what holiday you celebrate, it is a time to spread joy. This year certainly seems to need some, with everything that happened. It is now the time when many will choose a calendar to count down the days til the 25th.

Dinosaur Bath Buddies (Little Hero)

2.8 (9 votes)

As a young child, I loved splashing around in the tub with my toys. Who didn’t? Most of my bath toys were sharks and whales and other aquatic creatures, but occasionally a plesiosaur would find its way into the mix. My older son, however, enjoys taking his bath with the Classic Big Four: Brontosaurus, Stegosaurus, Triceratops, and Tyrannosaurus rex.

Dinosaur Colosseum (2019 release by Takara Tomy)

2.5 (40 votes)

Hello, who’s this?

Takara Tomy is a prolific toy manufacturer which has produced a number of dinosaur-related toys in the past. Most of these toys have been released under the ANIA (sometimes “Animal Adventure”) line, but some have received more unique lines of their own. One such line, short-lived as it appears to have been, was the Dinosaur Colosseum, which first released in 2015 as a set of three blind-boxed figurines (almost blind – each box has a unique numbering for identification).

Dinosaur Excavation no. 7 (Capsule MiniQ Museum by Kaiyodo)

4.6 (17 votes)

This set of reissued figurines offers an updated, good-quality variety of animals for collectors who might have missed earlier releases.

Kaiyodo’s miniature dinosaur lines might be among the very best in the market, even with more and more high-end companies entering the scene in recent years. It’s a shame that acquiring Kaiyodo’s figurines hasn’t gotten any easier for collectors outside of Japan – especially in the wake of the 2020 pandemic, and the ensuing shipping bottlenecks which have only made imported goods all the more expensive.

Dinosaur Habitats with Dimetrodon, Elasmosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus (Playland Books)

2 (2 votes)

Review and photos by Charles Peckham, edited by Suspsy

Dinosaur Habitats is described as a book, but it’s not bound with pages in the traditional sense. Rather, it stretches out like an accordion to reveal three pop-up displays that each include a paragraph talking about the geological period and area they represent.

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