Stegosaurus (Desktop model by Favorite Co. Ltd, sculpted by Michael Trcic)

I recently decided to give in to a long-lasting urge and purchased my first ever desktop dinosaur models. Given the considerable price tag on some of these statues, it can be a big decision, especially in these days of online shopping when it’s difficult to know if it’s really worth it, and when there’s risk of damage during transit.

Stegosaurus Michael Trcic Desktop model

This Stegosaurus is one of several dinosaurs in a line of desk top models sculpted by Michael Trcic and produced by Favorite Co. Ltd. (I’ve no idea how to pronounce Mike’s second name by the way, are those ‘c’s hard or soft? “Trike”? “Trisick”?). As mentioned above, these are delicate sculptures molded in resin and with a large size and mass, so there is a greater than average risk of damage during transit. This was the primary reason for my hesitation to place the order in the first place, and my worries were well founded. Happily, the Stegosaurus, with all its spikes and spines, arrived safely in one piece. Unfortunately I cannot say the same of the other model I ordered, despite it being very well packed. An Allosaurus in the same line, intended as a counterpart to display alongside the Stegosaurus, suffered a break through the only supporting leg (which still stands actually, it must be reinforced with metal?), demonstrating that these models really are as delicate as they look. But these risks, while worth bearing in mind, cannot be avoided.

Stegosaurus Michael Trcic Desktop model

The Stegosaurus is sculpted upon a rocky landscape attached to a fine wooden base. A name-bearing plaque indicates the ‘front’ of the sculpture, which I consider just a niggly bit restrictive. The posture of the animal is modern, with the tail raised high and the forelimbs held straight and pillar-like. Three of the legs are planted firmly on the base. The fourth leg, the right hind limb, is raised in mid-step. It is unusual to see hind legs raised like this is dinosaur figures because it makes them unstable. Sculptors of dinosaur statues have the freedom to experiment with more dynamic postures, which would be unstable in a freestanding figure. The neck curves around to the right so that the head is almost facing backwards, and the mouth is agape, as if letting out an almight…roar…honk…grunt? I like honk.

Stegosaurus Michael Trcic Desktop model

The statue is anatomically accurate on all accounts. There are four spikes at the tip of the tail and the distinct diamond shaped plates correctly number seventeen. There are three claws on the hind feet and five on the front feet. Texturally, the skin on the model appears wrinkled and aged, not scaly as it really should, but we can allow a little artistic license. The plates have many delicate furrows and ridges.

Stegosaurus Michael Trcic Desktop model

The orange plates and green skin are quite typical of Stegosaurus models for some reason. The tummy is also orange/light brown, and a golden wash of paint gives the skin a shimmering appearance. The plates are neatly sprayed brown in the centre and around the edges, giving a very striking look. The areas that are painted by brush are less satisfactory, for example, the green paint on the feet has splodged onto the rocky base in several places and the odd brush hair is embedded in the green paint. The first five plates on the neck are also messily done. In my opinion the quality of the paint job does not quite match the quality of the sculpt, although only the most eagle-eyes observers should notice.

Stegosaurus Michael Trcic Desktop model

Overall, this statue looks great and displays beautifully, particularly next to my fixed-up Allosaurus. While more expensive than most dinosaur figures, the Trcic line is quite reasonably priced for such extravagant models.

Available on eBay here

11 Responses to Stegosaurus (Desktop model by Favorite Co. Ltd, sculpted by Michael Trcic)

  1. Prior to getting my Sideshow Stegosaurus statue, this was one of the best Stegosaurus statue I used to have in my collection.

  2. Pingback: Allosaurus (Desktop model by Favorite Co. Ltd, sculpted by Michael Trcic) | Dinosaur Toy Blog

  3. This figure looks really nice, but the shade of green turns me off.

  4. I think 17 is the generally accepted number, yeah. This is a beautiful sculpt. I really like the Trcic models. Back at SVP ’08, I was lucky enough to nab a Trcic T.rex from this same line for $60, which I considered a steal. I should do my own photo essay of it sometime on my blog…is there a singular website where his models are sold? I’d love to see the Allosaurus.

  5. Stegosaur toys always seem to have really random numbers of plates, and I couldn’t find any scientific publications that stated how many they’re supposed to have. Do all known Stegosaurus specimens seem to have seventeen?

  6. I can’t say I like the bluish paint on the body. It might be a fun one to repaint (just wish you don’t mess up…)

  7. Maybe it isn’t wood, but just looks like it?

  8. I believe Mike told me he pronounces his name “Ter-sick”. This is the first I’ve heard of a Favorite model being attached to the wood base, though. Interesting.

  9. Again, if true, I stand corrected…and so should the Stegosaurus.

  10. Marc (Horridus)

    I don’t think the feet are correct; as with sauropods I believe it’s been found that Stegosaurus had fewer externally visible claws than it had toes. Splitting hairs though.

  11. Never saw this guy before. I like the colors though.

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