Avaceratops (Jurassic World Epic Evolution Danger Pack

3.4 (19 votes)

The chaos continues! Dinosaurs have evolved, and more species are on the loose! This may sound scary, but it does not have to be. The usually docile, bighorn sheep-sized Avaceratops has been spotted at high altitudes, getting comfortable in their modern colder environments.

Megalosaurus (painted version by Invicta)

4.3 (26 votes)

It is a gray winter day in Jurassic England as the great reptile patrols the forest’s edge. The hunter’s stride seems sluggish at a glance – indeed, the weather is unusually cold this year, and most normal reptiles would have succumbed to the dismal temperatures already.

Kentrosaurus (Jurassic World, Color Change Captivz by ToyMonster)

3.4 (24 votes)

With the new year comes a new set of Captivz Pop N Lock dinosaurs to collect. If you’re unfamiliar with what Captivz are, they’re blind bag figures hidden inside plastic eggs. Also included in the egg is a bag of slime (the figure is separate from the slime) and a token or trading card with the figure’s stats.

Eotyrannus (Beasts of the Mesozoic by Creative Beast Studio)

4.1 (35 votes)

As the Neovenator pair appears on the scene, the nesting Iguanodons begin rising to their feet and bellowing aggressively. The carnivores pace back and forth rapidly in front of them, jaws snapping and sharp eyes scanning for any discernible weaknesses as they attempt to panic the big herbivores into stampeding.

Upcoming releases from Mattel (New for 2024)(Pt.10)

3 (22 votes)

Two new dinosaurs in the Mattel Jurassic World: Gigantic Trackers series have been unveiled. First we have Bajadasaurus, a South American dicraeosaur famous for its impressive neck spines. Its action feature consists of a raising/lowering neck.

And here is the giant carnosaur Mapusaurus, also a resident of South America.

Dreadnoughtus (CollectA)

3.8 (34 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Dreadnoughtus schrani is a titanosaur from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian to Maastrichtian) of present-day South America. Remains of only two individuals have been described to date, both from the Cerro Fortaleza Formation in Argentina.

Kosmoceratops (Haolonggood)

4.2 (31 votes)

Kosmoceratops is a genus of Chasmosaurine that lived about 75 million years ago in what is now the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Park in Utah. This is where the Kaiparowits formation is located, a rock formation that during the Cretaceous was a jungle bordering the Western Interior Seaway.

Stegosaurus (Boley by Gosnell)

2.9 (26 votes)

 

Venturing the sea of unlicensed “3rd-party” dinosaur toys can bring interesting results. Sometimes one can find hidden gold; other times one finds something like this Stegosaurus figure, which is certainly among the more unusual takes I’ve seen of the famous roofed reptile (albeit probably not intentionally so).

Ceratosuchops (CollectA)

4.4 (43 votes)

For many years, the only described spinosaur from the United Kingdom was the famous baryonychine Baryonyx. That finally changed in 2021 with the announcement of two additional species: Riparovenator milnerae and Ceratosuchops inferdios. Both were discovered in the Wessex Formation on the Isle of Wight, both are estimated to have been around 8.5 metres in length, and both have been determined to be more closely related to Suchomimus than Baryonyx.

Upcoming release from Kaiyodo (New for 2024)

4.3 (32 votes)

Kaiyodo has revealed “The King of the Dinosaurs,” a 47 cm x 31 cm x 32.5 cm polystone statue mounted atop a wooden base. The world’s most famous and beloved prehistoric animal is posed majestically and menacingly with mouth wide open to reveal all the dentition and one foot placed atop the head of a defeated foe (I don’t reckon I need to specify names here).

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