Classification: Hadrosaur

Anatosaurus (Edmontosaurus) (Definitely Dinosaurs by Playskool)

1.5 (6 votes)

The Definitely Dinosaurs line by Playskool was a series of dinosaur toys produced in the late 80’s and early 90’s. For those unfamiliar with them they were basically the more toddler-friendly version of Tyco’s Dino-Riders. Some of them, like the Stegosaurus, were eerily similar to their Tyco counterparts. If you were a dinosaur obsessed kid during this time period you no doubt had a few Definitely Dinosaurs in your toy box.

Anatosaurus AKA Edmontosaurus (Wendy’s Exclusive from Definitely Dinosaurs by Playskool)

1.8 (4 votes)

Review and photographs by Charles Peckham, edited by Suspsy

Before we get into talking about this toy, I think it’s worthwhile to discuss the history of the genus that we’re calling Anatosaurus, especially since this is the first review of a toy labeled with that genus on this website.

Anatotitan (Sue at The Field Museum by Safari Ltd)

4.6 (10 votes)
In 2005, Safari LTD produced a line of 4 figures for the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL. Among these is one of the best hadrosaur figures of recent years. Most famous for its role as the hapless victim of Tyrannosaurus in the classic Walking With Dinosaurs series, Anatotitan was a large hadrosaur that lived 68 – 65 million years ago in North America, coexisting with more famous dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, and Ankylosaurus.

Ancient Fossils (Toob by Safari Ltd)

4 (8 votes)

Of all the product lines offered by stalwart manufacturer Safari Ltd, the “Toob®” line gives them the freest rein to explore unusual taxa. I’m personally fondest of the Toobs that furnish small versions of small animals that might scale well with Safari’s full-size figurines. We’ve reviewed some of their most interesting Toobs featuring “alive” animals here, here, here, here, and here.

Brachylophosaurus (Jasman)

3.3 (4 votes)
As promised, or should I say threatened, we’re continuing on with my series of Jasman toy reviews. This time we’re looking at a curious little fellow, it’s an ornithopod of sorts, but one of questionable identity. Apparently this figure has been advertised as Maiasaura, Brachylophosaurus, and Iguanodon. I’m tagging it as Brachylophosaurus because that’s what it resembles the most.

Corythosaurus (Antediluvia Collection)

4.7 (7 votes)
Corythosaurus is a relatively well known duck-billed dinosaur, or hadrosaur that lived in what is now Canada about 80-72 million years ago. Its name means “helmet reptile” because of the shape of the hollow crest that adorns its skull. The Corythosaurus that is part of the tiny and beautiful Antediluvia Collection, sculpted by artist, David Krentz, is no short of stunning just like the rest of the members of this collection.

Corythosaurus (Bernd Wolter Design)

4.7 (3 votes)
I do not know the exact history of this lovely lifesize Corythosaurus baby, the very proud of my collection. I bought it at a flea market in Münster four or so years ago. I had recognized it as at least related to the models of the Dinosaurierpark in Münchehagen, but I was more than just a little irritated to find such an item on a flea market.

Corythosaurus (Carnegie Collection by Safari ltd)

4.5 (15 votes)
Corythosaurus was a lambiosaurine hadrosaur that lived during the Campanian in the Late Cretaceous about 75 million years ago. Its bones were discovered in Canada and the USA. It belongs to the same general group of dinosaurs as its slightly more popular cousin, Parasaurolophus. This particular dinosaur is also known for supplying skin imprints which can be seen at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Corythosaurus (Caroline) (Prehistoric Animal Models by PNSO)

4.6 (19 votes)

While many of us debate over which of the spectacular Tyrannosaurus toys released over the last couple decades are the best and most definitive, we can all pretty much agree on what the best Corythosaurus toy is or was. And while the 1993 Carnegie Collection Corythosaurus was the unquestionably best figure of that genus it is alarming to think that that particular toy had remained the definitive version of that genus for the last 27 years.

Corythosaurus (CollectA)

2.1 (7 votes)
Thanks to its distinctive rounded crest that resembles a helmet when viewed from the side, Corythosaurus is one of the most recognizable hadrosaurids. It’s also one of the best-known, with multiple complete skeletons, more than twenty fossil skulls, and mounted specimens in museums throughout North America. Like its relative Parasaurolophus, Corythosaurus‘ crest may have functioned as a vocalization chamber.

Corythosaurus (Natural History Museum by Toyway)

2.8 (5 votes)
Review and photos by Paul Carter, edited by Suspsy
Corythosaurus, the “helmet lizard,” is one of the best-known “duck billed” dinosaurs. Discovered in 1914 in North America by Barnum Brown, it is a lambeosaurine hadrosaur and, like its more famous cousin Parasaurolophus, had a crest that possibly served as a sound chamber that gave the animal a distinctive call.

Corythosaurus (Replica-Saurus by Schleich)

4.2 (5 votes)
Review and photos by Lanthanotus, edited by Suspsy
When the term hadrosaur is combined with a toy, it usually results into a Parasaurolophus. While this genus may still not be as overrepresented as some carnivorous theropods, it easily exceeds all other hadrosaur renditions in number. Just recently I came across a comparably rare Corythosaurus figure produced by a major company which hit the shelves 20 years back and has been retired for way more than 10 years already.

Deinosuchus vs. Parasaurolophus Diorama (Dinosauria by Sideshow)

5 (4 votes)
Review by Dan Liebman of DansDinosaurs.com
Photos by Jeremy Killian
The fifth entry in Sideshow’s Dinosauria line features a predation scene like many others, yet with only a single true dinosaur. Deinosuchus vs. Parasaurolophus looks to be an almost classical depiction of violence in the natural world, the massive jaws of a monstrous crocodilian clamping down on a hapless creature that was presumably ambushed while drinking at the water’s edge.

Dino Skulls (Toob by Safari Ltd.)

4.8 (11 votes)
From the savage teeth of tyrannosaurs to the intimidating horns of ceratopsians to the endearing crests of hadrosaurs and to the peculiar noggins of pachycephalosaurs, dinosaur skulls truly are stupendous. I previously reviewed Safari’s toob of prehistoric mammal skulls; now I’ll be looking at their Dino Skulls toob. There are eleven skulls in total, all painted medium brown with streaks of dark grey for a worn appearance.
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