Stegosaurus (Boley by Gosnell)

2.9 (27 votes)

Venturing the sea of unlicensed “3rd-party” dinosaur toys can bring interesting results. Sometimes one can find hidden gold; other times one finds something like this Stegosaurus figure, which is certainly among the more unusual takes I’ve seen of the famous roofed reptile (albeit probably not intentionally so).

Ceratosuchops (CollectA)

4.3 (44 votes)

For many years, the only described spinosaur from the United Kingdom was the famous baryonychine Baryonyx. That finally changed in 2021 with the announcement of two additional species: Riparovenator milnerae and Ceratosuchops inferdios. Both were discovered in the Wessex Formation on the Isle of Wight, both are estimated to have been around 8.5 metres in length, and both have been determined to be more closely related to Suchomimus than Baryonyx.

Upcoming release from Kaiyodo (New for 2024)

4.3 (32 votes)

Kaiyodo has revealed “The King of the Dinosaurs,” a 47 cm x 31 cm x 32.5 cm polystone statue mounted atop a wooden base. The world’s most famous and beloved prehistoric animal is posed majestically and menacingly with mouth wide open to reveal all the dentition and one foot placed atop the head of a defeated foe (I don’t reckon I need to specify names here).

Evolution of Humanity (Tama-Kyu)

4.2 (19 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Prehistoric and primitive hominids are not rare in the animal toy market, but evolutionary sets of them are. The first, and probably the most popular, was called Evolution of Man, produced by Bullyland in 1999. The set featured Dryopithecus, Australopithecus, and four species of Homo: H.

Kannemeyeria (3D Print by Mike Eischen)

3.8 (17 votes)

Dinosaurs weren’t the first giant plant-eaters to roam the Earth; that frontier was pioneered first among vertebrates by the dicynodonts, a group of tusked therapsids (the clade which includes modern mammals) which survived the Permian Mass Extinction and lasted to the end of the Triassic period. They ranged widely in size and distribution, from the diminutive Diictodon, to the pervasive Lystrosaurus, to giants like Lisowicia and Kannemeyeria.

Nanuqsaurus (CollectA)

4.1 (47 votes)

Nanuqsaurus (“polar bear lizard”) is a poorly understood Alaskan tyrannosaurine that lived around 68 to 70 million years ago. Although it is presently known only from fragments of skull and an array of teeth, it recently received a major boost of publicity in 2022 by appearing in the first season of the fabulous Apple TV series Prehistoric Planet.

Metriacanthosaurus (Jurassic Park Hammond Collection by Mattel)

3.7 (45 votes)

The release of genera such as Metriacanthosaurus, Concavenator, and Irritator in the Hammond Collection line was initially met with controversy. Some collectors were excited to see non-canonical dinosaurs join the prestigious Hammond Collection while others were dismayed, hoping the dinosaurs seen in the films would be given priority.

Protoceratops (Beasts of the Mesozoic: Ceratopsian Series 1/6 by Creative Beast Studio)

4.4 (37 votes)

A famous story, an ancient tragedy, a spectacular discovery. Two dinosaurs, locked in lethal combat, suddenly perished from external forces, their bodies preserved almost perfectly in their last moments of action. What was cause of the combat and demise? Paleontologists have speculated long and hard since the year 1971, when an expedition to the Gobi Desert led to the discovery of the fossil now renowned as “The Fighting Dinosaurs” – a Protoceratops with its sharp beak grasping the arm of a Velociraptor, whose sickle claw is embedded in the herbivore’s neck.

Goticaris (Extinct Bath Bomb by Diamond Company)

4.1 (18 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Goticaris longispinosa is a tiny, enigmatic arthropod originally described from both immature and adult forms from the Orsten Lagerstätten (Upper Cambrian) of present day Sweden. It was originally described as an early offshoot of the clade Pancrustacea but is now considered stem-group Mandibulata outside of Pancrustacea.

Poposaurus (Jurassic World Epic Evolution, Danger Pack by Mattel)

3.8 (48 votes)

Mattel loves Pseudosuchians, or so it would seem. Just this year they released five of these crocodile-line archosaurs. Not since Bullyland’s heyday have we seen so many representatives of the group made by a single company, and I think Mattel must surely win the award for most Pseudosuchians ever produced.

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