Author: Suspsy

Suspsy has lived in Canada all his life. One day when he was in kindergarten, his teacher did a lesson on dinosaurs and put up some giant cutouts on the wall. Suspsy immediately began pretending to be a Tyrannosaurus rex at playtime, and continued to do so for many subsequent playtimes. Since then, he has acquired two degrees, worked many different jobs, travelled to many fantastic locations, fallen in love, gotten married, and settled down to raise a family, but his passion for dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals has never waned.

All reviews by this author

Eotyrannus (Beasts of the Mesozoic by Creative Beast Studio)

4.2 (38 votes)

As the Neovenator pair appears on the scene, the nesting Iguanodons begin rising to their feet and bellowing aggressively. The carnivores pace back and forth rapidly in front of them, jaws snapping and sharp eyes scanning for any discernible weaknesses as they attempt to panic the big herbivores into stampeding.

Ceratosuchops (CollectA)

4.3 (44 votes)

For many years, the only described spinosaur from the United Kingdom was the famous baryonychine Baryonyx. That finally changed in 2021 with the announcement of two additional species: Riparovenator milnerae and Ceratosuchops inferdios. Both were discovered in the Wessex Formation on the Isle of Wight, both are estimated to have been around 8.5 metres in length, and both have been determined to be more closely related to Suchomimus than Baryonyx.

Nanuqsaurus (CollectA)

4.1 (47 votes)

Nanuqsaurus (“polar bear lizard”) is a poorly understood Alaskan tyrannosaurine that lived around 68 to 70 million years ago. Although it is presently known only from fragments of skull and an array of teeth, it recently received a major boost of publicity in 2022 by appearing in the first season of the fabulous Apple TV series Prehistoric Planet.

Dearc (Deluxe by CollectA)

4.4 (54 votes)

Discovered in the Lealt Shale Formation on the Isle of Skye in Scotland in 2017, Dearc sgiathanach (pronounced ‘jark ski-a-naw-ka’) was a Middle Jurassic rhamphorhynchine pterosaur, and quite a large one at that. Its precise size is uncertain, but the estimated wingspan is between 1.9 and 3.8 metres, which makes it the largest known aligerous animal of its time as well as one of the largest known rhamphorhynchids.

Dilophosaurus Ambush (Jurassic Park 30th Anniversary by LEGO)

4.1 (24 votes)

“Season’s greetings, fellow dinosaur lovers! Yes, it is us once again, Dr. Bella Bricking and my invaluable partner Beth Buildit, here to share some comfort and joy with the reviewing of yet another Jurassic Park 30th Anniversary set!”

“I can barely see with this thing on, Doc!”

“Let’s stick to the script, if you please, Beth.

Dacentrurus (Haolonggood)

4.7 (45 votes)

Happy Hen Toys has generously provided me with my first ever Haolonggood review subject: Dacentrurus. The very first stegosaur to be formally described and named in 1875 (the original name was Omosaurus until someone realized in 1902 that it was already taken), Dacentrurus is estimated to have been up to nine metres in length and five metric tons in weight, making it presently the second largest known member of its family after Stegosaurus.

Sinotyrannus (Jurassic World: Gigantic Trackers by Mattel)

3.9 (33 votes)

Most of the known basal tyrannosauroids from Asia are relatively small fry like Dilong, Guanlong, and Xiongguanlong, with the 7.5 metre long Yutyrannus being the most famous exception. But Sinotyrannus was an even bigger beast, estimated to have achieved around 9.1 metres long and 2.8 tons, which would put it in the same size category as Albertosaurus, Daspletosaurus, and Gorgosaurus.

Teratophoneus (Beasts of the Mesozoic by Creative Beast Studio)

4.3 (60 votes)

Today marks a milestone in the life of young Sealgair. For years, he observed his father and mother as they tracked, pursued, and killed one prey animal after another, never giving up until he and his siblings had filled their bellies with meat. Those lessons have served him well once he set out into the world on his own.

Triceratops (Jurassic World: Roar Strikers by Mattel)

The face of a Triceratops toy action figure by Mattel

3.2 (26 votes)

Triceratops is, as we all know full well, the most familiar and famous of all the ceratopsians by far. Here on the DTB, it is the second most reviewed genus after Tyrannosaurus rex. And, of course, its appearance in the original Jurassic Park film is quite unforgettable.

Troodon (Mojo Fun)

3.3 (45 votes)

Alas, poor Troodon. Beginning in the late 1980s and continuing all the way into the 2010s, it was widely hailed as the smartest dinosaur of them all. It became a fixture of books, documentaries, and films in which it was frequently depicted as a swift, graceful, big-eyed predator that hunted down small mammals in the night.

Megaraptor (Jurassic World: Roar Strikers by Mattel)

3.3 (60 votes)

Megaraptorans are an unusual clade of theropods that are all presently known from incomplete fossil remains, yet are generally characterized by powerful arms terminating in frightfully huge claws. Just where precisely they fit into the greater theropod family tree has been an ongoing debate for years, but there is a growing consensus that they are either nested within Tyrannosauroidea, or represent a sister taxon to it.

Triceratops Research (Jurassic Park 30th Anniversary by LEGO)

3.7 (59 votes)

“Greetings and salutations once again, fellow dinosaur lovers! It is I, the one and only Dr. Bella Bricking, along with my trusty and ever-faithful companion, Beth Buildit! And today is a truly momentous occasion, is it not?”

“Yup, sure is, Doc. Exactly 30 years ago, a certain little movie called Jurassic Park opened in theatres worldwide and basically blew up right from the get-go.

Sarcosuchus (2021)(Jurassic World: Massive Biters by Mattel)

3.2 (81 votes)

Many of the most vibrantly coloured vertebrates living on the planet today are reptiles, particularly squamates such as the gold dust day gecko, the collared lizard, the rainbow boa, and the eastern coral snake. Certain testudines including the red-eared slider, the eastern box turtle, and the northern river terrapin also feature bold patterning and coloration.

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