Type: Figurine

Struthiomimus (Marx)

Struthiomimus dinosaur toy by Marx

4.1 (17 votes)

Review and Photos by BlueKrono and DinoToyBlog.

Struthiomimus, the ‘ostrich mimic’, was named in 1917 for a species (S. altus) originally referred in 1903 to the closely related genus Ornithomimus. Despite the history of ornithomimosaurs spanning back to the late 1800s, they are relatively rarely made as toys.

Tyrannosaurus rex (Honourable Lead Boiler Suit Company)

3 (21 votes)

Review and photos by Torvosaurus, edited by Suspsy

Howdy from wonderful, windy Wyoming! Today we’ll take a look at the Honourable Lead Boiler Suit (HLBS) Tyrannosaurus rex. The model is approximately 8 inches (20 cm) long, but the curve of the neck puts it closer to 9 inches (23 cm) and gives it a 1/52 scale.

Megalosaurus (painted version by Invicta)

4.3 (29 votes)

It is a gray winter day in Jurassic England as the great reptile patrols the forest’s edge. The hunter’s stride seems sluggish at a glance – indeed, the weather is unusually cold this year, and most normal reptiles would have succumbed to the dismal temperatures already. The great hunter is no normal reptile, however.

Corythosaurus (Honourable Lead Boiler Suit Company)

3.9 (19 votes)

Review and photos by Torvosaurus, edited by Suspsy

Howdy from wonderful, windy Wyoming! This will be my first review and warrants a Western welcome to introduce myself, as well as introducing the Honourable Lead Boiler Suit Company’s models. I’ve seen them mentioned on the forum, but these models lack reviews.

Kentrosaurus (Jurassic World, Color Change Captivz by ToyMonster)

3.4 (25 votes)

With the new year comes a new set of Captivz Pop N Lock dinosaurs to collect. If you’re unfamiliar with what Captivz are, they’re blind bag figures hidden inside plastic eggs. Also included in the egg is a bag of slime (the figure is separate from the slime) and a token or trading card with the figure’s stats.

Dreadnoughtus (CollectA)

3.8 (37 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Dreadnoughtus schrani is a titanosaur from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian to Maastrichtian) of present-day South America. Remains of only two individuals have been described to date, both from the Cerro Fortaleza Formation in Argentina. Dreadnoughtus was one of the largest dinosaurs; estimations put its total length at approximately 26 meters and its weight at 49,000 kilograms, although the holotype is believed to have not been fully grown at the time it died.

Stegosaurus (Boley by Gosnell)

2.9 (27 votes)

Venturing the sea of unlicensed “3rd-party” dinosaur toys can bring interesting results. Sometimes one can find hidden gold; other times one finds something like this Stegosaurus figure, which is certainly among the more unusual takes I’ve seen of the famous roofed reptile (albeit probably not intentionally so).

Ceratosuchops (CollectA)

4.3 (44 votes)

For many years, the only described spinosaur from the United Kingdom was the famous baryonychine Baryonyx. That finally changed in 2021 with the announcement of two additional species: Riparovenator milnerae and Ceratosuchops inferdios. Both were discovered in the Wessex Formation on the Isle of Wight, both are estimated to have been around 8.5 metres in length, and both have been determined to be more closely related to Suchomimus than Baryonyx.

Evolution of Humanity (Tama-Kyu)

4.2 (19 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Prehistoric and primitive hominids are not rare in the animal toy market, but evolutionary sets of them are. The first, and probably the most popular, was called Evolution of Man, produced by Bullyland in 1999. The set featured Dryopithecus, Australopithecus, and four species of Homo: H.

Kannemeyeria (3D Print by Mike Eischen)

3.8 (17 votes)

Dinosaurs weren’t the first giant plant-eaters to roam the Earth; that frontier was pioneered first among vertebrates by the dicynodonts, a group of tusked therapsids (the clade which includes modern mammals) which survived the Permian Mass Extinction and lasted to the end of the Triassic period. They ranged widely in size and distribution, from the diminutive Diictodon, to the pervasive Lystrosaurus, to giants like Lisowicia and Kannemeyeria.

Nanuqsaurus (CollectA)

4.1 (47 votes)

Nanuqsaurus (“polar bear lizard”) is a poorly understood Alaskan tyrannosaurine that lived around 68 to 70 million years ago. Although it is presently known only from fragments of skull and an array of teeth, it recently received a major boost of publicity in 2022 by appearing in the first season of the fabulous Apple TV series Prehistoric Planet.

Goticaris (Extinct Bath Bomb by Diamond Company)

4.1 (18 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Goticaris longispinosa is a tiny, enigmatic arthropod originally described from both immature and adult forms from the Orsten Lagerstätten (Upper Cambrian) of present day Sweden. It was originally described as an early offshoot of the clade Pancrustacea but is now considered stem-group Mandibulata outside of Pancrustacea.

Dearc (Deluxe by CollectA)

4.4 (54 votes)

Discovered in the Lealt Shale Formation on the Isle of Skye in Scotland in 2017, Dearc sgiathanach (pronounced ‘jark ski-a-naw-ka’) was a Middle Jurassic rhamphorhynchine pterosaur, and quite a large one at that. Its precise size is uncertain, but the estimated wingspan is between 1.9 and 3.8 metres, which makes it the largest known aligerous animal of its time as well as one of the largest known rhamphorhynchids.

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