Age: Cretaceous

Review: Albertosaurus (Jurassic World: Massive Biters by Mattel)

3.8 (19 votes)

Repaints have been a mainstay of every single Jurassic Park and Jurassic World toyline since the very beginning, but retools are much less common. Probably the most famous and popular retool is the 2009 Tyrannosaurus rex by Hasbro that was created using Kenner’s Lost World Bull from more than a decade earlier.

Review: Albertosaurus (Prehistoric Masterpiece Collection by X-plus)

4.4 (9 votes)
Albertosaurus is the smaller cousin of T. rex and is rarely found in the form of a dinosaur toy. The Prehistoric Masterpiece Collection is produced by Japanese sculptors  Araki and Shinzen; the figures are hand-painted and also included in this series is a Styracosaurus.

Review: Albertosaurus (Replica-Saurus by Schleich)

2.1 (19 votes)
Albertosaurus was a theropod related to Tyrannosaurus which roamed North America during the Late Cretaceous roughly 70 million years ago. Unlike its more famous cousin, Albertosaurus existed earlier and was much smaller, reaching only around 30 feet in length. The name means “Alberta lizard”, pertaining to where the holotype specimen of this animal was discovered in 1884.

Review: Albertosaurus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.7 (132 votes)

Seventy-one million years ago what is now Alberta, Canada, would have been located next to the Western Interior Seaway with various coastal habitats including swamps, marshes, tidal flats, lagoons, and estuaries. Familiar faces would have swum the aquatic ecosystems, including gar, bowfin, and sturgeon that are all present in North America’s freshwater habitats today.

Review: Alioramus (Age of the Dinosaurs by PNSO)

3.4 (24 votes)

Alioramus was one of the smaller tyrannosaurids to have arisen and thrived during the Late Cretaceous period. Mind you, the only known specimens thus far are juveniles and subadults, so just how big an adult could grow to be is unknown. Along with Qianzhousaurus, it appears to be part of a distinct branch of the tyrannosaur family.

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Review: Alioramus (Jurassic World: Wild Pack by Mattel)

3.8 (24 votes)

By now, I think it truly is safe and reasonable to say that Mattel has done better with the Jurassic Park license than any other company. Granted, outshining Hasbro was hardly difficult given what a substandard job they did, but what about Kenner? They may no longer around, but back in the glory days of the 1990s, they bestowed on us collectors a slew of awesome dinosaur toys, plus humans and vehicles if you were into that sort of thing (I never was).

Review: Alpha Velociraptor (Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect by Kenner)

3.3 (20 votes)

Review and Photographs By Sketchy, edited by Suspsy

While Jurassic World popularized the idea of genetically modified dinosaur hybrids, Kenner beat them to the idea over 17 years prior with the Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect line, a mix of crazy hybrids and similarly crazy repaints of old figures.

Review: Amargasaurus ( PNSO Scientific Art Model)

4.1 (32 votes)

Review and Photos by Bokisaurus

Greetings dinosaur fans! Today, we will review a figure that I am really excited about, the long awaited PNSO Amargasaurus! It has been a long wait, but the wait is so worth it.

Amargasaurus, as we should all know by now, is a medium sized early Cretaceous sauropod from South America.

Review: Amargasaurus (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd)

4.4 (27 votes)
Carnegie has to keep up with the dinosaur market, which was gotten really competitive lately, with near-perfect accurate sculpts, and amazing paintjobs, from lines like Kaiyodo, Kinto, and so on. For the last 4 years, Carnegie has been making some nice new molds. In 2006, they released a new Amargasaurus sculpt, along with an updated feathered Oviraptor.

Review: Amargasaurus (CollectA)

2 (21 votes)

I have heard it said that good things come in small packages, and the 2008 CollectA‘s Amargasaurus is certainly a diminutive figure. This was CollectA’s first attempt at the highly distinguishable sauropod, before releasing a deluxe figure a few years later. Of course, this strange early cretaceous dicraeosaurid was small by sauropod standards reaching 10 meters (33 feet) long and approx the same height as a Savanna elephant.

Review: Amargasaurus (Deluxe version by CollectA)

2.7 (19 votes)
Review and photographs by Tallin, edited by Plesiosauria.
One of the most recognisable of the sauropods, Amargasaurus cazaui has been well represented in toy form, with examples from most of the major brands. This is the second Amargasaurus that CollectA have released, this model dating back to 2012 and part of their 1:40 scale line – four years since their first attempt at recreating this beastie.

Review: Amargasaurus (Desktop model by Favorite Co. Ltd.)

3.4 (8 votes)
Most sauropods tend to more or less look similar; big body, long neck long tail. Rarely will a sauropod possess any distinguishing characteristics beyond those three things. Then there is Amargasaurus. This dinosaur was a smaller (relatively speaking) sauropod from the early Cretaceous in what is now Argentina.

Review: Amargasaurus (HG Prize by Sega)

4.3 (7 votes)
Review and photos by Bokisaurus, edited by Suspsy
In the Early Cretaceous of what would one day be Argentina, there lived one of the most distinctive sauropods known: Amargasaurus cazaui (La Amarga Lizard). Despite their huge size, complete sauropods skeletons are fairly rare. Fortunately, what was discovered of Amargasaurus‘ skeleton is nearly complete, including part of the skull.
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