All reviews by Griffin

Achelousaurus (Antediluvia Collection)

Yes, another Achelousaurus and yes, that’s a nickel its standing on.  Let me introduce the second member of the Antedeluvia collection to be reviewed here on the blog, David Krentz’s rendition of Achelousaurus.  If you would like more information on this particular ceratopsian dinosaur simply scroll down a bit and read the first paragraph of …

Achelousaurus (CollectA)

Achelousaurus was a ceratopsian that lived during the Campanian stage of the late Cretacious period.  It is named after the Greek river deity, Achelous who, according to myth, had his horn broken off during a fight with the famous Greek hero, Hercules.  The skull of Achelousaurus has a low, flat boss (or lumpy mass of …

Albertosaurus (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd)

Albertosaurus was a mid-sized theropod that flourished throughout what is now North America during the Campanian era of the late Cretacious about 75 million years ago.  It can best be described as a smaller, more lightly built version of its later, more famous relative, Tyrannosaurus rex.  It coexisted with and most likely hunted other famous …

Allosaurus (Carnegie Collection by Safari ltd.)

Allosaurus is one of the most well known meat-eating dinosaurs.  Its fossils date back to the late Jurassic and have been found in both Portugal and the United States.  It is characterized by wicked three-clawed hands and a skull that could have been utilized like a hatchet to slice off chunks of meat from carcasses.  …

Amargasaurus (Desktop model by Favorite Co. Ltd.)

Most sauropods tend to more or less look similar; big body, long neck long tail. Rarely will a sauropod possess any distinguishing characteristics beyond those three things. Then there is Amargasaurus. This dinosaur was a smaller (relatively speaking) sauropod from the early Cretaceous in what is now Argentina. It is highly distinguishable amongst other dinosaurs …

Anchiceratops (Dinotales Series 7 by Kaiyodo)

Anchiceratops was a large ceratopsian that lived during the late Cretaceous in what is now Canada. Like its relative, Chasmosaurus, Anchicratops is characterized by possessing a large frill complete with two large openings called finestre to prevent the skull from being too heavy. When if comes to scientific accuracy, Kaiyodo did a lovely job with …

Chasmosaurus (CollectA)

Chasmosaurus is a fairly well known ceratopsian that lived in Canada during the Campanian era of the Late Cretacious.  It’s characterized by a distinctly tall and wide frill accompanied by three horns on its face.  At least three individual species of this dinosaur are known due to variation amongst frills and horns on various skulls.  …

Corythosaurus (Antediluvia Collection)

Corythosaurus is a relatively well known duck-billed dinosaur, or hadrosaur that lived in what is now Canada about 80-72 million years ago. Its name means “helmet reptile” because of the shape of the hollow crest that adorns its skull. The Corythosaurus that is part of the tiny and beautiful Antediluvia Collection, sculpted by artist, David …

Corythosaurus (Carnegie Collection by Safari ltd)

Corythosaurus was a lambiosaurine hadrosaur that lived during the Campanian in the Late Cretaceous about 75 million years ago. Its bones were discovered in Canada and the USA. It belongs to the same general group of dinosaurs as its slightly more popular cousin, Parasaurolophus. This particular dinosaur is also known for supplying skin imprints which …

Dimetrodon (Carnegie Collection by Safari ltd.)

Review and photos by Griffin Dimetrodon is probably one of the most well known non dinosaur prehistoric creatures of all time.  It lived during the early to middle Permian era way before any dinosaur and is actually more closely related to us mammals than it is to other kinds of reptiles.  It would have been …

Dracorex (CollectA)

The skull of Dracorex was found in the Hell Creek Formation in the United States and dates back to the Maastrichtian age at the very end of the age of dinosaurs.  Its full name, Dracorex hogwatsia, translates to “Dragon King of Hogwarts” which pretty much makes it the coolest official name in science ever.  The …

Iguanodon (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd)

Iguanodon was the second dinosaur ever to be recognized by science. The first fossils of the animal were teeth unearthed in England in 1822. Since then this iconic dinosaur’s image has undergone numerous changes throughout history as more discoveries are made about it. Iguanodon belongs to the extremely large and successful group of dinosaurs called …

Leptoceratops (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd)

Leptoceratops was a small ceratopsian from the Maastrichtian period at the very end of the Cretacious in North America. It would have lived alongside it’s much more famous cousins, Triceratops and Torosaurus as well as other dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus, Pachycephalosaurus and Anatotitan to name a few. Unlike many of its contemporaries, however, this guy was …

Loch Ness Monster (Monsters in My Pocket Series 2 by Matchbox)

Monsters in My Pocket was a toy franchise that started in the 80s that consisted of a series of small, rubber figures. These figures were each only a few inches tall and could each come in a variety of solid colors. What makes this toy line special is that each figure is modeled after a …

Lycaenops (Jurassic Park, Series 2 by Kenner)

Review and Photos by Griffin Lycaenops was a three foot long mammal-like reptile, or Therapsid from Southern Africa during the Late Permian. It’s a distant later relative of the much more famous sail-backed, Dimetrodon. Its name means “Wolf Face” rightfully so due to its canine-like fangs on its upper and lower jaws. These would have …