Author: Dan

Dan Liebman runs the store Dan's Dinosaurs.

All reviews by this author

Pachyrhinosaurus (Beasts of the Mesozoic)

4.7 (28 votes)

Spring 2021 saw the arrival of the second wave of ceratopsians from the Beasts of the Mesozoic series. Fans of Dave Silva’s crowdfunded line of articulated figures will already be familiar with the basic elements that define this series. These strikingly colorful figures have a tremendous range of poseability thanks to their intricately engineered design (which may have the added benefit of making them more difficult for bootleggers to imitate).

Ceratosaurus (Sideshow Dinosauria)

4.7 (7 votes)

Given how frequently Ceratosaurus shows up in pop culture, it is a little surprising that so few people can identify it. Certainly, one cannot fault it for lack of a catchy name, which makes it sound like a walking nightmare composed of dripping gore and massive steak knives. Indeed, its horny visage must have inspired visions of reptilian monstrosities, echoing our earliest impressions of a lizard-like Iguanodon.

Tupuxuara Skeleton Kit (Boneyard Pets)

4 (1 votes)
If you’re around my age, you probably remember the old balsa wood dinosaur skeleton kits. After inhaling all the sawdust from sanding and pulling the splinters out of your fingers, you had a fairly serviceable model that didn’t even require glue to assemble (assuming the cheap wood didn’t break apart, which it often did).

Tyrannosaurus “Tyrant King” (Sideshow Dinosauria)

4.8 (12 votes)
Review by Dan Liebman of DansDinosaurs.com
Photos by Chris Kastner of BackyardTerrors.com
If you ask a paleontologist what the two main types of dinosaur might be, you’re likely to receive an answer containing the words “Saurichia” and “Ornithischia”. Pose this same question to a manufacturer of dinosaur models, and you may discover an altogether different dichotomy: “T.

Pachyrhinosaurus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.8 (13 votes)
The approach of 2014 means an exciting new line from each of our favorite prehistoric figure manufacturers. However, there’s an extra surprise this year – the new 2014 line from Safari Ltd. has already arrived! While their offering is impressive as always, I have to say that my most anticipated figure is the Pachyrhinosaurus, and Safari has really delivered on this piece.

Dilophosaurus (Sideshow Dinosauria)

5 (2 votes)
On November 8, 2012, Sideshow offered the first preview image of the Dilophosaurus statue. This choice of species does not come as a great surprise to many of us, as we all know that this creature was featured prominently in a rather successful film in 1993. Sideshow’s Dinosauria line first set out to demonstrate the great profitability of dinosaurs without a major franchise backing them, perhaps making Dilophosaurus all the more an expected choice.

Gryposaurus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.8 (15 votes)
Call me strange, but this is really my favorite new release for 2013. Only Safari Ltd. has the stones to tackle the often-overlooked hadrosaurine (or saurolophine, if you’re keeping up with the times) dinosaurs, with an excellent Edmontosaurus replica being foremost in recent memory. These gentle giants did not have the ostentatious headgear of their lambeosaurine kin, making their presence in a mass-produced figure line all the more impressive.

Euoplocephalus in Egg Maquette (Sideshow Dinosauria)

5 (3 votes)
In 2013, Sideshow Collectibles released an extremely limited edition model featuring a baby Euoplocephalus. Of course, every Sideshow Dinosauria model is produced in limited quantities, and once they are sold out, they often fetch high prices at auction sites. So why all the fuss over this sweet little dinosaur?

Concavenator (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd.)

4.4 (7 votes)
In recent years, the fossil beds of Spain have provided spectacular examples of dinosaurs, but perhaps the most famous is Concavenator. First revealed in 2010, this allosauroid’s distinctive physique made it an instant celebrity. The peculiar hump along the back does not seem as awe-inspiring as the humongous sails lining the backs of certain other critters, yet it has clearly made an impression upon us.

Stegosaurus (Sideshow)

5 (5 votes)
Sideshow’s rendition of the mighty Stegosaurus was released in summer of 2012. At 16″ high and 26″ long, the term “mighty” becomes quite appropriate. While previous models like the Apatosaurus may have been technically greater in length, there is a great visual difference between an animal with a long, slender tail, and one that is bolstered by huge plates along the entire body.

Triceratops 1:15 (CollectA)

3.9 (9 votes)
One of the standout pieces in CollectA’s 2012 lineup is this 1:15 scale reconstruction of Triceratops. The creation of this piece was certainly influenced by the success of CollectA’s giant 1:15 Tyrannosaurus model. However, while the giant Rex was essentially a “blown up” version of their popular “Deluxe” sized figure, this Triceratops is an entirely new sculpt.

Triceratops (Resin Model by Shane Foulkes)

5 (4 votes)
Review by Dan, Photos by Marilyn P. and Jeremy K.
When it comes to classic plant-eating dinosaurs, there is probably no match in popularity for the mighty Triceratops. The silhouette and skull are truly iconic, and no matter how far our interest in paleontology may wander, the eye is always drawn back to this beloved animal.

Woolly Rhino (Safari Missing Links)

3.6 (5 votes)
Review by Patrick Król Padilha
Today’s review is going to focus on a prehistoric mammal model, one of my favorites among all mammal figures I have. The animal it represents is the Woolly Rhinoceros, actually defined on the tag by genus and species as Coelodonta antiquitatis. This model predates the start of my collection in at least six years, so I didn’t really witness its release for the first time nor could I buy one when it was largely available.
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