Author: Indohyus

Indohyus Growing up in the late 1990s and early 2000s was great for moulding me into a dino fan. Jurassic park films were fresh, and even better, the ‘Walking With’ trilogy was produced. I watched ‘Dinosaurs’ and then ‘Beasts’. Especially ‘Beasts’. From there, I went on digs across the U.K., and eventually got my degree in palaeontology from Portsmouth university. I am (at the time of writing this) doing my masters in anthropology and museum studies, hoping to become a curator. My love of plastic extinct animals is as strong as ever, and I dare say it will only get stronger!

All reviews by this author

Review: Sand Dig Surprise (Jurassic World Dominion by Mattel)

2.3 (9 votes)

In the immortal words of Monty Python “And now for something completely different”. Brands will often make a variety of small pieces for kids that are cheap, allowing adults to keep kids quiet for a short while. I happened to see one such on a recent shopping trip and decided to see what you get for a small sum of £3.

Review: Paraceratherium, Deluxe (CollectA)

4.2 (24 votes)

When companies have been around for a long time, the opportunity for remaking it arises. In prehistoric species, the better for it, as new information can completely change the look of an animal. And with the announcement of a new model of Paraceratherium, many were thrilled.

Review: Jurassic World Dominion Minis part 2 (Jurassic World by Mattel)

3.9 (14 votes)

Well, I’ve shown you the worst of this line, let’s waste no time and get straight on to the best of them!

Starting off the top half is everyone’s favourite three horned herbivore Triceratops. This features one of the best poses of the lot (something I haven’t talked at length about as most the figures are in a generic standing pose), an aggressive fight pose, all the better when you have two to joust with.

Review: Jurassic World Dominion Minis part 1 (Jurassic World by Mattel)

3.7 (13 votes)

The Jurassic Park/World has had it’s fair share of miniature dino models, from the original metal ones to hard plastic. Now Jurassic World Dominion brings hard (ish) rubber, safer for siblings, and we see one and two packs of minis, giving plenty of material to review. But how to cover them?

Review: Giant Wonambi (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

3.6 (10 votes)

I love picking up rare species on the toy market, especially where they are part of groups that are rarely made. As mentioned previously, snakes are incredibly rare on the toy shelves, likely because they don’t vary too much so don’t sell well. Thankfully, Yowie comes in to the rescue, giving us the Giant Wonambi, a constrictor from the Pleistocene of Australia, the first fossil snake found in Australia.

Review: Owen’s Horned Turtle/Ninjemys (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

3.5 (8 votes)

Fossil turtles, aside from Archelon, are extremely rare in toy form. There have been many different, interesting species over the millennia. Enter Yowie to set the record straight! And with quite the species too, with what they call Owen’s Horned Turtle. But this is no average turtle, this is Ninjemys, Owen’s Ninja Turtle!

Review: Pleistocene Marsupial Lion/Thylacoleo (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

3.3 (9 votes)

Marsupials now are an interesting group, adapted to many different environments. In the distant past, even more incredible marsupials were around, megafauna and powerful carnivores lived in Australia, now gone from the world. One was a koala relative, adapted as a top predator, the Thylacoleo.

Review: Centrosaurus apertus (Beasts of the Mesozoic)

4.7 (51 votes)

Over the years, despite having a large amount of fossil material behind it, Centrosaurus has very little in terms of figures that aren’t named Monoclonius. Fortunately, recent times have brought this near forgotten species to the forefront. Beasts of the Mesozoic leads this by creating three, two juveniles and an adult.

Review: Neanderthal vs. Denisovan vs. Homo Sapiens Set 1 (Linear-A)

4 (5 votes)

The last million years has seen the rise of one of the most successful mammals of all time: humans, now the last of the genus Homo. It wasn’t so long ago that this wasn’t the case, as 50,000 years ago humans shared the world with at least 3 other Homo species.

Review: Passenger Pigeon (Forgotten Friends Series A by Yowie)

4.3 (8 votes)

It is always tragic when humans in avertedly cause an animal to become extinct, whether because we didn’t know how limited the population was, destroying habitats or releasing animals that the ecosystem isn’t prepared for. What is intolerable, however, is when a species is rare and humans actively wipe the majority out.

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