Libraraptor

Hello, my name is Stefan Schröder, aka ‘Libraraptor’, and I am a faithful soul on both the Dinosaur Toy Blog and the Dinosaur Toy Forum since 2008, when I stumbled upon the forum looking for the Invicta blue whale in order to complete my collection.  I found friendly people there and open ears and eyes for my growing collection. Later I began reviewing toys and figures here on the blog. I enjoy this interest as much as I did in 2008. I come from Germany, was born in 1977, I’m married and I have a daughter and a son. I am a full-time social worker, working with handicapped children and their families. My collection is sometimes said to be somewhat quirky, I collect what I like with no special goal or focus. Here’s a video (on the Dinotoyblog Youtube channel) showing my collection, it’s a little outdated, but still shows the main part of it.

All reviews by this author

Dimetrodon (“Kellogg´s” cereal freebie)

Ah, another Dimetrodon! This Permian synapsid belongs to the group of usual suspects in the competition for the most popular prehistoric animal. It is well-known, highly popular and long ago iconic. So nothing has to be written about the species itself here anymore, I guess. Still there are many surprising figures of it out there, …

Mammoth (Cuddly toy giveaway by “Mammut” company)

A Swiss company which produces outdoor clothing and equipment named itself „Mammut“ after the iconic Mammoth, probably because the prehistoric giants were as well equipped against cold and rainy weather conditions as you are supposed to be if you wear a Mammut product.  The company even leads a black mammoth in their logo. What an …

Protoceratops (“Ersthornsaurier”) (Margarinefiguren by Wagner)

Five or so years ago I introduced to you a line of so called „Margarinefiguren“  (meaning margarine figures) which had been produced by or for a German food company named „Wagner“ 60 or so years ago.  The company added them to their food packages as little collectibles for kids as a buying incentive  for their …

Minmi (Science and Nature, Pty Ltd.)

Today I´d like to introduce to you Science and Nature Minmi. The company did it as a part of their signature line of figures, “Animals of Australia Realistic Toy Replicas.” Minmi is the name of a small herbivorous ankylosaurian dinosaur that lived during the early Cretaceous Period of Australia, about 119 to 113 million years …

Iguanodon (2001) (Bullyland)

For some reason the 2001 version of an Iguanodon by Bullyland has not been reviewed yet. This text is going to change that. I guess I don´t have to tell anyone here anything about lower Cretaceous ornithhischian Iguanodon, one of the most widespread, best known and best examined dinosaur species ever. To anticipate my conclusion, …

Agustinia (Schleich)

Today I would like to do a review of Schleich´s Agustinia. I would like to begin this review with my conclusion: Overall, it is a decent sauropod figure, if it wasn´t for the goofy head and the blunt color scheme. Schleich definitely saves on colors and efforts in supporting a decent sculpt with decent coloring. …

Postosuchus (Schleich)

Postosuchus, meaning “Crocodile from Post“, is an extinct genus of rauisuchid reptiles comprising two species, P. kirkpatricki and P. alisonae, that lived in what is now North America during the Late Triassic. Its name refers to Post Quarry, a place in Texas where many fossils of the type species, P. kirkpatricki, were found. Representations of …

Animantarx (Schleich)

A great dinosaur figure is a figure I can´t take my eyes off. A great dinosaur figure is a figure I want to hold in my hand again and again, just to enjoy how it feels. The texture of the skin, ist detail, the spikes, the pose: Everything has to appeal to me surpassingly. A …

Utahraptor (AAA)

Okay, let´s take a closer look at AAA Utahraptor today. After a long break, welcome to another Libraraptor review of a quirky figure! By now, Utahraptor is a well known genus belonging to the group of Dromaeosaurs. Its size of seven meters in length makes it the biggest of the tribe. Many companies, for example …

Pelecanimimus (De Agostini)

Back in the 1990s there was a publication called “Dinosaurs!”. Publisher De Agostini would introduce to us the dinosaurs and their world in many issues. One special dinosaur would get a titlee story, there were stories about other dinosaurs and prehistoric beasts, a 3D – poster in the middle of each issue and on the …

Edaphosaurus (Fèves)

Over eight (!) years after reviewing Bullyland Edaphosaurus here, which was my very first review, I´d like to do a review my second Edaphosaurus now, the one, well, “by”, Féves. Fèves is no company but the term for tiny little figurines made from ceramic / porcelain. It´s a collector´s world on its own, extending over …

Moschops (White Post)

White Post is no company, but the location of “Dinosaur Land”, a theme park dedicated to prehistoric animals in Virginia, USA. This park has been run as a family business for over 50 years now. Early in the history of the park the operators had the idea of having some of their lifesize figures made …

Iguanodon (Naturecraft)

The Naturecraft Ltd. company was founded in 1931 in Congleton, Cheshire, UK. It was one of Congleton’s oldest companies, and was headed until its buyout by Managing Director Peter Tomlins. Naturecraft England originally produced figurines such as dogs and other animals, as well as caricatures and other wall art. All items were originally made in …

Nothosaurus (Margarinefiguren by Wagner)

In my former review of the Wagner/Shreddies Pareiasaurus I announced some unusual species choices. Did I promise too much when I now introduce to you their Nothosaurus? Nothosaurus was no dinosaur. Its name means “false lizard”, unfortunately I do not know which circumstances this name refers to. Nothosaurus probably had a lifestyle similar to today´s …

Wangensaurier (Pareiasaurus) (Margarinefiguren by Wagner)

Today I would like to introduce to you the „Wangensaurier“ (literally meaning „cheek lizard“) from the “Wagner Margarinefiguren” series. When these figures were released sixty or so years ago, it was quite common in Germany to give prehistoric creatures German names and not to use the common species name. What is called “Wangensaurier” actually means …