Classification: Theropod

Review: Young Tyrannosaurus rex (Jurassic Park by Kenner)

4.8 (46 votes)
Following yesterday’s look at the queen of the Jurassic Park toyline, here we present the pretender to the throne. This ‘young’ Tyrannosaurus rex (also known by the cutesy if nonsensical name of ‘Junior’) is about half the size of its big red sister, but is no less mean-looking for its diminutive stature.

Review: Yutyrannus (Beasts of the Mesozoic by Creative Beast Studio)

4.7 (91 votes)

Review and photos by Faelrin, edited by Suspsy

Yutyrannus is both one of my favorite theropods and favorite dinosaurs in general these days. I still remember coming across an online news article about it back in early 2012 and being excited to see that they finally found a large feathered dinosaur.

Review: Yutyrannus (PNSO)

4.6 (31 votes)

Feathered dinosaurs are truly awesome and I adore them all, whether they’re from somewhere in the Mesozoic or still alive in the present, probing for earthworms on my lawn, swimming in the pond at the park, flying high in the sky, and so on. And certain of these extant dinosaurs are, of course, quite yummy to eat, especially when they’re from Swiss Chalet or Mary Brown’s.

Review: Yutyrannus (REBOR)

2.1 (15 votes)
Review and photos by Predasaurskillekor, edited by Suspsy
This is my very first review for the Dinosaur Toy Blog and I have chosen this model. The 2014 1/35 scale Yutyrannus huali is the first model created by the UK brand called REBOR. It is a very good and realistic model, and unfortunately, there are not many versions of this unique species (there is only this one, the Wild Safari, and the Kaiyodo one).

Review: Yutyrannus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.6 (27 votes)
Review and photographs by Tallin, edited by Plesiosauria.
Approximately 125 million years ago, Northern China had a similar temperature to today – it was cold – at least by Mesozoic standards. Indeed, the Yixian Formation of China shows that the climate of this part of early Cretaceous China would have had an average temperature of only 10°C.

Review: Z-Cardz Dinosaurs Series 1 (California Creations)

2.9 (7 votes)

A relic of toy trends from the 2000s, these cheap assembled models make for a decent little novelty item, as long as you’re delicate with them.

I’ve never been much of a “card” collector, so I’ve never followed the hobby closely, but I do recall a time in the early 2000s when 3D card models like Z-Cardz and Star Wars Pocketmodels became all the rage, at least within my own friend circles.

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Review: Z-Cardz Dinosaurs Series 2 (California Creations)

1.9 (8 votes)

The second set of dinosaurs in the Z-Cardz line reveals some surprising, if questionable, choices going on in the lineup for these little collectibles.

Constructible strategy games are a concept typically involving 3D punch-out card minifigures, which can be collected and utilized for play in large-scale games between players.

Review: Z-Cardz Prehistoric Series 1 (California Creations)

2 (11 votes)

The models in this set are a nice set of famous or classic prehistoric genera, but they definitely leave a lot to be desired as interesting renditions of said animals.

Welcome to the third entry of the Z-Cardz review series! Z-Cardz were a constructible card game line by California Creations, which predated the more prolific game lines by companies like WizKids, who officially coined the term for this style of toy.

Review: Z-Cardz Prehistoric Series 2 (California Creations)

2.1 (7 votes)

Despite only featuring dinosaurs, this set still offers an interesting variety of genera; but how well do the designs hold up?

Welcome to the fourth and final review for the Z-Cardz dinosaur figurines, part of the larger Z-Cardz line that began in 2001. Produced by a small company named California Creations, Z-Cardz were a pioneer brand in what are now commonly known as Constructible Card/Strategy games, involving punch-out card figures which can be bought in a variety of different packs and sets.

Review: Zhenyuanlong (Beasts of the Mesozoic: Raptor Series by Creative Beast Studio)

4.8 (49 votes)

Review and photos by EmperorDinobot, edited by Suspsy

Dinosaur figure collectors! The future is now thanks to science! The super articulated, somehow scientifically accurate dinosaur figures are now a reality! Super articulated dinosaur figures have existed in the past, such as the Carnage figures by ReSaurus that are so dear to me, but that was twenty years ago!

Review: Zhuchengtyrannus (PNSO)

4.7 (35 votes)

Approximately 73 million years ago, Shendong Province of China was a land of rich floodplains that abounded in dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes. These included the ankylosaur Sinankylosaurus, the titanosaur Zhuchengtitan, the diminutive leptoceratopsids Ischiceratops and Zhuchengceratops, and the larger ceratopsid Sinoceratops with its royal frill.

Review: Zhuchengtyrannus magnus (Dino Kingdom 2012 by Takara Tomy)

2.5 (2 votes)
Here’s something unique! Although the animal was described in 2011, Tomy are the only company to have produced a Zhuchengtyrannus magnus figure (so far – I can’t imagine Collecta will leave it alone forever). The Dino Kingdom 2012 expo had a particular focus on Chinese dinosaurs, so it’s only fitting to see this huge tyrannosaur among the tie-in toy lineup.

Review: Zhuchengtyrannus vs Sinoceratops (Favorite Co. Ltd)

4.8 (6 votes)
Review and photos by Triceratops83, edited by Suspsy
The Favorite Zhuchengtyrannus and Sinoceratops come packaged in a boxed set for the Fukui Dinosaur Museum in Japan. They are sculpted by Favorite’s premiere artist, Kazunari Araki. Both of these dinosaurs are only known from fragmentary remains, so the scale is a bit iffy, but they fit in well enough with other 1:40 figures (or possibly slightly smaller).
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