Xenoceratops (CollectA)

4.2 (17 votes)
Review and photos by Bokisaurus, edited by Plesiosauria.
It shouldn’t come as a surprise that CollectA has chosen yet another obscure species to join their expanding herd of ceratopsians. Meet Xenoceratops foremostensis – “alien horned-face”. Released as part of CollectA’s 2014 standard-sized figures, this late Cretaceous centrosaurine ceratopsian was first unearthed in 1958, but was just recently described as a new species.

Xiongguanlong (CollectA)

4.5 (22 votes)
Discovered in China in 2006, the tiger-sized Xiongguanlong represents a “missing link” of sorts between diminutive tyrannosauroids like Dilong and gargantuan tyrannosaurids like T. rex.

The 2015 CollectA Xiongguanlong measures 10 cm long and is 6 cm tall including the raised tail. This makes it by far the smallest figure in the 2015 assortment.

Xiphactinus (Deluxe Prehistoric Models by CollectA)

4.9 (27 votes)

For collectors of prehistoric fishes 2021 has been a banner year, it saw the release of several toy fishes and two of them weren’t an O. megalodon or Dunkleosteus. Astonishing! Of course, we got those too. Papo tackled the meg. and PNSO released their own Dunkleosteus. But the real headliners were the Helicoprion by PNSO and the subject of today’s review, the Xiphactinus by CollectA.

Xiphactinus (Fauna Casts)

4 (5 votes)

Before there was Jaws, before there was The Meg, there was Xiphactinus.

Although sharks have been a constant nightmare in many pop culture’s films and stories, these fishes were not the only ones that have the reputation of being ferocious, and definitely not the largest. There were other, less known nightmarish fishes that hunted the prehistoric oceans, one of them is Xiphactinus, the subject of today’s review. 

In the late Cretaceous, a vast inland sea once bisected what we know today as North and South America.

Xtractaurs (Mattel)

2.7 (3 votes)

Review and photos by Charles Peckham, edited by Suspsy

I don’t own all the Xtractaurs, and I’m not sure if anyone does, but I feel I’ve been able to amass enough to give a decent overview of the series. Anyone who wants to review an individual Xtractaur for the Dinosaur Toy Blog, included in this review or otherwise, has my blessing.

Young Tyrannosaurus Aaron (PNSO)

4.7 (49 votes)

When it comes to Tyrannosaurus rex, the first image that comes to mind is that of a snarling, blood-thirsty animal. As famous as it is, unfortunately in pop culture films and images, it is often depicted as a villain, a killer that is always on a rampage killing any helpless animal on its way. 

So, the description of being cute is not often associated with it.

Young Tyrannosaurus rex (Jurassic Park by Kenner)

4.8 (43 votes)
Following yesterday’s look at the queen of the Jurassic Park toyline, here we present the pretender to the throne. This ‘young’ Tyrannosaurus rex (also known by the cutesy if nonsensical name of ‘Junior’) is about half the size of its big red sister, but is no less mean-looking for its diminutive stature.

Yutyrannus (Beasts of the Mesozoic by Creative Beast Studio)

4.7 (79 votes)

Review and photos by Faelrin, edited by Suspsy

Yutyrannus is both one of my favorite theropods and favorite dinosaurs in general these days. I still remember coming across an online news article about it back in early 2012 and being excited to see that they finally found a large feathered dinosaur.

Yutyrannus (PNSO)

4.6 (27 votes)

Feathered dinosaurs are truly awesome and I adore them all, whether they’re from somewhere in the Mesozoic or still alive in the present, probing for earthworms on my lawn, swimming in the pond at the park, flying high in the sky, and so on. And certain of these extant dinosaurs are, of course, quite yummy to eat, especially when they’re from Swiss Chalet or Mary Brown’s.

Yutyrannus (REBOR)

1.9 (13 votes)
Review and photos by Predasaurskillekor, edited by Suspsy
This is my very first review for the Dinosaur Toy Blog and I have chosen this model. The 2014 1/35 scale Yutyrannus huali is the first model created by the UK brand called REBOR. It is a very good and realistic model, and unfortunately, there are not many versions of this unique species (there is only this one, the Wild Safari, and the Kaiyodo one).

Yutyrannus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.5 (24 votes)
Review and photographs by Tallin, edited by Plesiosauria.
Approximately 125 million years ago, Northern China had a similar temperature to today – it was cold – at least by Mesozoic standards. Indeed, the Yixian Formation of China shows that the climate of this part of early Cretaceous China would have had an average temperature of only 10°C.

Z-Cardz Dinosaurs Series 1 (California Creations)

2.5 (6 votes)

A relic of toy trends from the 2000s, these cheap assembled models make for a decent little novelty item, as long as you’re delicate with them.

I’ve never been much of a “card” collector, so I’ve never followed the hobby closely, but I do recall a time in the early 2000s when 3D card models like Z-Cardz and Star Wars Pocketmodels became all the rage, at least within my own friend circles.

Z-Cardz Dinosaurs Series 2 (California Creations)

1.3 (6 votes)

The second set of dinosaurs in the Z-Cardz line reveals some surprising, if questionable, choices going on in the lineup for these little collectibles.

Constructible strategy games are a concept typically involving 3D punch-out card minifigures, which can be collected and utilized for play in large-scale games between players.

Z-Cardz Prehistoric Series 1 (California Creations)

1.4 (7 votes)

The models in this set are a nice set of famous or classic prehistoric genera, but they definitely leave a lot to be desired as interesting renditions of said animals.

Welcome to the third entry of the Z-Cardz review series! Z-Cardz were a constructible card game line by California Creations, which predated the more prolific game lines by companies like WizKids, who officially coined the term for this style of toy.

Z-Cardz Prehistoric Series 2 (California Creations)

1.3 (4 votes)

Despite only featuring dinosaurs, this set still offers an interesting variety of genera; but how well do the designs hold up?

Welcome to the fourth and final review for the Z-Cardz dinosaur figurines, part of the larger Z-Cardz line that began in 2001. Produced by a small company named California Creations, Z-Cardz were a pioneer brand in what are now commonly known as Constructible Card/Strategy games, involving punch-out card figures which can be bought in a variety of different packs and sets.

error: Content is protected !!