Classification: Titanosaur

Alamosaurus (CollectA)

3.3 (20 votes)
Review and photographs by Tallin, edited by Plesiosauria.
One of the last and most massive of the sauropods, Alamosaurus sanjuanensis, was a colossal titanosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period. Its reign lasted right up until the K-T extinction and it lived in the same environments as Tyrannosaurus rex – it has been found all over North America.

Ampelosaurus (1:35 Scientific Art and Model by Haolonggood)

Ampelosaurus 3/4 right side

4.2 (42 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Ampelosaurus atacis is a titanosaur described in 1995 from fossils from the Late Cretaceous (Early Maastrichtian) of present day France. Interestingly, in 2012 morphometric studies of titanosaur fossils from the area showed the presence of a second, currently undescribed species of titanosaur, bringing into question historic reconstructions of the animal (a little more on that later in the review).

Ampelosaurus (Age of the Dinosaurs by PNSO)

3.7 (20 votes)
Ampelosaurus was a relatively small sauropod that lived in Europe during the Late Cretaceous. To protect itself against predators, this titanosaur’s back was covered in an impressive array of armoured osteoderms.

Meet Lans, the little Ampelosaurus from PNSO. He measures about 9.5 cm long, although he’d be longer if his tail were held out straight behind him instead of curling fluidly to the left.

Ampelosaurus (CollectA)

4.3 (24 votes)
Among prehistoric collectible enthusiasts, the company currently known as CollectA has a considerable reputation to cope with. Their figures, although competitively priced, have ranged anywhere from decent to embarrassing over the past few years. Fortunately, their lineup for 2011 kicks off with a batch of fresh faces that have clearly been more carefully constructed than their predecessors.

Austrosaurus (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

2.4 (5 votes)

Across the globe, the bones of mighty giants of the ancient world are waiting to be found. The largest of the land animals are the Titanosaurs, giant sauropods found across the globe. Here, we examine one early titan from Australia, Austrosaurus, a 5 metre tall sauropod found in the Albian rocks of Queensland.

Dinosaurs Of Japan (Capsule Q Museum by Kaiyodo)

4.3 (8 votes)
For most of the field’s history, the bulk of paleontological research has occurred in North America, a fact reflected in the average dinosaur shelf lineup. There’s certainly no shortage of figures representing classics like Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, and Stegosaurus, while more obscure species from elsewhere in the world languish in the shadows.

Dreadnoughtus (CollectA)

3.8 (37 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

Dreadnoughtus schrani is a titanosaur from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian to Maastrichtian) of present-day South America. Remains of only two individuals have been described to date, both from the Cerro Fortaleza Formation in Argentina. Dreadnoughtus was one of the largest dinosaurs; estimations put its total length at approximately 26 meters and its weight at 49,000 kilograms, although the holotype is believed to have not been fully grown at the time it died.

Dreadnoughtus (Jurassic World: Dominion by Mattel)

4.4 (37 votes)

Dreadnoughtus schrani was a species of titanosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous in what is now Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. It was discovered in 2005 in the Cerro Fortaleza Formation by Kenneth Lacovara and described in 2014. The name Dreadnoughtus translates to “fears nothing,” and what an apt name it is.

Malawisaurus (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.5 (16 votes)
Review and photographs by Lanthanotus, edited by Dinotoyblog
If you looked out for toy figures of obscure species, CollectA would have been the choice for most collectors. In recent years, however, other major companies joined in and started to release sculpts of prehistoric animals that were or still are not known to many people, Safari Ltd being one of them.

Patagotitan (Wild Safari: Prehistoric World by Safari ltd.)

4 (18 votes)

Safari’s first dinosaur of 2022 has finally arrived, and while it might not be the show-stopper some would hope for, this sauropod is a well-made representation closely based on published material.

We love dinosaurs – especially BIG dinosaurs. The sheer size possessed by many of these ancient reptilian creatures has always played a part of their allure to the public.

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