Type: Baby Dino

Beibeilong “Baby Louie” (Dino Discoveries by Safari Ltd)

4.8 (5 votes)
Review and Photographs by Quentin Brendel (aka Pachyrhinosaurus), edited by Suspsy
In yet another museum partnership, Safari Ltd produced a model of the dinosaur embryo known as “Baby Louie” for the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. It’s believed that the dinosaur itself was an oviraptorid, however, not much has been published on it because the fossil was originally smuggled out of China and was in the hands of a private collector.

Brachiosaurus (in egg) (‘Dinosauria Collection’ by Sideshow Collectibles)

4.7 (3 votes)
Review and photographs by Brandon. Edited by Plesiosauria.
Back in February during the time of the 2009 Toy Fair, Sideshow Toys revealed that they were going to include in addition to their many lines a series of their own called “Sideshow’s Dinosauria.” I was extremely pleased with the first two offerings, Tyrannosaurus rex vs.

Deinonychus Hatchling (Johan Scherft)

3.3 (3 votes)
Review and photos by Lanthanotus, edited by Suspsy
Following my review about the Styracosaurus hatched from a chocolate surprise egg, I’ll introduce you to a “real” hatchling in this review, just the right thing to put some Mesozoic spice to your upcoming Easter celebrations–the model of hatching Deinonychus by talented Netherlands artist Johan Scherft.

Dinosaur Bath Buddies (Little Hero)

2.2 (6 votes)

As a young child, I loved splashing around in the tub with my toys. Who didn’t? Most of my bath toys were sharks and whales and other aquatic creatures, but occasionally a plesiosaur would find its way into the mix. My older son, however, enjoys taking his bath with the Classic Big Four: Brontosaurus, Stegosaurus, Triceratops, and Tyrannosaurus rex.

Dinosaur Boxset 2 (Toyway)

4 (2 votes)
Review and photos by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
We’ve all seen them. The crude dinosaur toys that you get in small museum shops for extremely cheap prices, normally just bought by parents to keep their children quiet for a while. The last thing you’d expect is to put six of these together and sell them as a box set.

Euoplocephalus in Egg Maquette (Sideshow Dinosauria)

5 (3 votes)
In 2013, Sideshow Collectibles released an extremely limited edition model featuring a baby Euoplocephalus. Of course, every Sideshow Dinosauria model is produced in limited quantities, and once they are sold out, they often fetch high prices at auction sites. So why all the fuss over this sweet little dinosaur?

Halfbaby Dinosaur Set (Yantai, distributed by Learnplay Inc.)

3.2 (5 votes)

Review and photos by Charles Peckham, edited by Suspsy

Trying to find information about either the creator of these toys, a Chinese company named Yantai, or their American distributor, Learnplay Inc., isn’t easy. According to one of the few sources I was able to find, Yantai has been around since 2011 and their Halftoy line is just one of hundreds of designs they have made.

Hatchling T. Rex “Rudy” (Club Selection by REBOR)

4.5 (31 votes)
Review and photos by predasaurskillekor, edited by Suspsy
When Sideshow Collectibles revealed their Brachiosaurus hatchling in 2009, it might have inspired REBOR to create their own take on a hatching dinosaur. The REBOR Club Selection line features only limited edition models numbering about 1000 worldwide. After their first two non-limited edition models (Yutyrannus huali and the T.

Iguanodon (Jurassic Park Junior by Playskool / Hasbro)

Iguanodon Jurassic Park Junior toy

2.3 (3 votes)
This so-called “Li’l Iguanodon” was part of a short-lived ‘Jurassic Park Junior’ toy line released in 2001, presumably prompted by the release of Jurassic Park 3 in cinemas that same year. The line was aimed at young audiences and is made up of cutesy renditions of several dinosaurs from the Jurassic Park film series.

Maiasaura “Lil’ Hadro” (Dinotopia by Accent International)

4.5 (4 votes)

Review and photographs by Loon, edited by Suspsy.

We return to the land apart from time to review the second Dinotopia plush released by Accent International in 1993, “Lil’ Hadro.” This is certainly an odd choice by Accent, as no character named “Lil’ Hadro” appears in any of the books. Things do start to make some sense when we look at the tag, however.

Parasaurolophus (Baby)(AAA)

3.5 (2 votes)

Review and photographs by Funk, edited by Suspsy

Parasaurolophus seems to be the hadrosaur with the most toy representations by far, no doubt due to its charismatic, iconic head crest. It just looks neat, design-wise, compared to, for example, Lambeosaurus with its weird hatchet, Corythosaurus with its dull plate, or Tsintaosaurus and the unfortunate way its crest used to be depicted.

Prehistoric Playground Dinosaur Set (Melissa and Doug)

2.8 (4 votes)
So at is turns out, my daughter is a little bit dinosaur obsessed. Nothing crazy like the kids on the “Dino Dan” TV series that she’s watched at least three times through but obsessed enough that this dinosaur obsessed father beams with joy when she corrects grandma; “it’s not an Apatosaurus grandma, it’s a Brachiosaurus”.

Protoceratops “Bix” (Dinotopia by Accent International)

4.3 (3 votes)

Review and photos by Loon, edited by Suspsy

Released in 1992, James Gurney’s book Dinotopia follows the shipwrecked scientist Arthur Denison and his son Will as they journey through the titular island, where dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals escaped extinction and coexist with humanity. This book was extremely popular during the 1990s, garnering sequels, prequels, all sorts of merchandise, a computer game, and at one point, was going to be adapted into a Hollywood movie by Sony. That didn’t pan out, but Disney did end up producing a TV miniseries in 2002.

Protoceratops (Carnegie Collection by Safari Ltd.)

3.7 (6 votes)
One of the more unusual early Carnegie releases (© 1988), this Protoceratops is less dinosaur toy, more cheap-‘n’-cheerful diorama. The inspiration’s pretty obvious for anyone who’s read a dinosaur book or two (a classic case of mistaken identity – nobody tell this guy!), but it made for an odd early entry among the chunky theropods with painted-on teeth.

T. rex Hatchling (Dino Discoveries by Safari)

2.9 (7 votes)
Review by Patrick Krol
Since I started collecting dinosaur figures I wanted to have dinosaur eggs in my collection, but couldn’t find a good one anywhere. Then, when I discovered about the foreign museum lines through internet, I found out that Safari had done some hatchling dinosaurs and they were soon in my “things to buy” list.
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