Age: Miocene

Review: Adansonia, Baobab (by Schleich and CollectA)

4.6 (22 votes)

The family of Baobabs is one of the most distinct and recognizable trees in the world. Eight species exist under the genus Adansonia, they are native to Subsaharaian Africa, Madagascar and Australia. The natural history of Baobabs is somewhat clouded and methods as molecular clocking yield debatable results.

Review: Amebelodon (Prehistoric Life Collection by Safari Ltd.)

4.5 (27 votes)
Amebelodon was a genus of prehistoric proboscidean which evolved along the Gulf Coast of North America roughly 10 million years ago during the late Miocene, eventually migrating to Asia via the Bering Land Bridge which would have connected Alaska and Russia. The animal became extinct on the North American continent about 6 million years ago but survived in Asia and Africa up until around 5 million.

Review: American Mastodon (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd.)

4.7 (35 votes)

The American mastodon, Mammut americanum, is one of the very best-known prehistoric mammals. Many complete skeletons have been found throughout the North American continent, from this one-tusked male at the Royal Ontario Museum to this female and calf from the La Brea Tar Pits of California.

Review: Ceratogaulus (MPC)

3.9 (24 votes)

A truly rare genus in the hobby to this day, MPC’s vintage figurine marks a bold move from a company most famous for its imitations – although the toy is perhaps showing its age with some design choices.

MPC (Multiple Products Corporation) is a well-known brand among experienced dinosaur collectors; their prehistoric line from 1961 and 1962 was widely sold through stores and catalogs for decades.

Review: Chalicotherium (Bullyland)

4.6 (5 votes)
To celebrate Bullyland’s highly anticipated re-release of their prehistoric mammal collection I felt it was a good time to review the only Bullyland mammal figure I actually own, the Chalicotherium. For those of you out of the loop on this a brief overview is in order. Bullyland is a German toy company notable for producing its figures right in Germany.

Review: Cohen’s Thingodonta/ Yalkaparidon (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

4 (4 votes)

There aren’t many animals in the world known by their scientific name as opposed to a common name, yet the palaeo world seems to only use them, unless they are particularly well known, like the Woolly Mammoth or T. rex. That’s why I love this particular model, of an animal named Yalkaparidon (from the Aboriginal word for boomerang, based on the animals molar shape), but referred to in the common lexicon as Cohen’s Thingadonta, which is a brilliant name.

Review: Daeodon (CollectA)

4.8 (16 votes)
The carcass is days old, decaying, and beset with insects, but that means nothing to the marauder. He seizes the prize in his monstrous jaws and crunches down decisively. Bone fragments, crushed marrow, rancid meat, and still-wiggling maggots all disappear down his throat. He pauses only to emit a wet belch before resuming his feast.

Review: Deinotherium (Bullyland)

4.4 (5 votes)
I guess it is time for a review of Bullyland Deinotherium.
It is a highly sought after figure, not yet a myth, but quite close. This is due to the relatively little number of Deinotheriums that have been produced and delivered.
Deinotherium (“terrible beast”) was a large prehistoric relative of modern-day elephants that appeared in the Middle Miocene and continued until the Early Pleistocene.

Review: Deinotherium (Deluxe Collection by CollectA)

4.5 (13 votes)

History: One of the biggest Proboscideans of all time lived during the Early Miocene through to mid Pleistocene, yet it is largely forgotten by the general public. The Woolly Mammoth gets all the attention and love, with appearances in film, literature, and in toy form. The family of Deinotheriidae feels ancient as it branched away from the current extant species of Elephants earlier than most of the other families.

Review: Deinotherium (Eofauna)

5 (24 votes)

The pungent stench of masuclinity crawls along the edge of the forest. Leaves rustling softly as a vicious looking creatures ambles through the undergrowth. The young Deinotherium male looks up and hesitates as the potential adversary strides onto the grassy clearing. Much advanced in age and experience, the rival is much smaller then the young male, but also much bulkier.

Review: Deinotherium (Mojö Fun)

4.4 (14 votes)
The name Deinotherium means “terrible beast,” and this powerful pachyderm must have seemed like one to our early hominid ancestors who lived alongside it in Africa during the Pleistocene epoch. Standing around 4 metres tall and weighing anywhere from 10 to 13 tons, it was possibly the third largest proboscidean of all time after the 24-ton Asian straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon namadicus (the largest land mammal of all time!) and the 15-ton mastodon Mammut borsoni.

Review: Deinotherium (Starlux)

3.6 (10 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
Once again I find myself returning to the origins of dinosaur figurines, Starlux, to look at another animal reproduced long before other companies got to it. This time, it’s Deinotherium, the terrible beast! A relative of modern elephants, this powerful probiscidian could grow to 13 ft tall and weigh as much as 11 tonnes (based on the largest species, D.

Review: Diatryma (Schleich)

3.3 (6 votes)

The Vintage Schleich Diatryma is a nice little figure to have! It is brightly coloured (although I know of monochrome ones being out there) and looks as if it is smiling at you. Looking at this figure, one can’t believe it was a more or less aggressive Eocene omnivore, lurking for prey in the Messel woods, not even avoiding small horses.

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