Age: Eocene

Review: Adansonia, Baobab (by Schleich and CollectA)

4.6 (22 votes)

The family of Baobabs is one of the most distinct and recognizable trees in the world. Eight species exist under the genus Adansonia, they are native to Subsaharaian Africa, Madagascar and Australia. The natural history of Baobabs is somewhat clouded and methods as molecular clocking yield debatable results.

Review: Ancient Fossils (Toob by Safari Ltd)

4 (22 votes)

Of all the product lines offered by stalwart manufacturer Safari Ltd, the “Toob®” line gives them the freest rein to explore unusual taxa. I’m personally fondest of the Toobs that furnish small versions of small animals that might scale well with Safari’s full-size figurines. We’ve reviewed some of their most interesting Toobs featuring “alive” animals here, here, here, here, and here.

Review: Andrewsarchus (CollectA)

4.8 (23 votes)
Andrewsarchus mongoliensis could be thought of as the mammalian equivalent of Spinosaurus in that it was a gigantic carnivore known only from scant remains. Namely, a single skull discovered in Mongolia by the legendary Roy Chapman Andrews in 1923. Once thought to have been a mesonychid, Andrewsarchus has since been determined to be an artiodactyl, and thus related to entelodonts, hippos, and whales.

Review: Andrewsarchus (Play Visions)

2.5 (6 votes)

Part 3 of 4 – Large Play visions Prehistoric mammals

Dust funnels swept across the dry and hot landscape. It’s been months since the last rain and the vegetations, once lush, has now turned brown. Animals that inhabit this environment are under tremendous stress as they seek out food and shelter from the exhausting heat.

Review: Andrewsarchus (Prehistoric Life Collection by Safari Ltd)

3.9 (13 votes)
Andrewsarchus was a large basal mesonychid which existed roughly 45 million years ago during the Eocene epoch. It is known only from a large skull measuring more than three feet long and a few bone fragments, so most reconstructions of the animal’s postcranial anatomy are based on its smaller and more well known mesonychid relative Mesonyx.

Review: Arsinoitherium (CollectA)

4.5 (19 votes)
Arsinoitherium was a large herbivorous denizen of swamps and rainforests during the late Eocene and early Oligocene eras. Despite its resemblance to a rhinoceros, it was more closely related to elephants, hyraxes, and sirenians.

Released by CollectA in 2014, this Arsinoitherium toy measures just about 18.5 cm long from the tips of its horns to the end of its tail.

Review: Arsinoitherium (Prehistoric Life Collection by Safari Ltd)

4.1 (18 votes)
Arsinoitherium was a large paenungulate mammal which lived roughly 30 million years ago during the late Eocene and early Oligocene epochs in Northeastern Africa. These animals would have superficially resembled modern rhinoceroses but were in fact more closely related to elephants. Unlike those of a rhinoceros, the massive horns of Arsinoitherium were comprised of solid bone. 

Review: Basilosaurus ( CollectA)

4.1 (25 votes)
Review and photos by Bokisaurus

Happy New Year everyone! this will be my first review for 2019!

Back in the late Eocene, the world’s oceans were a much warmer, shallower than they are today. If you took a stroll along the beach back then, you may think that you have stepped into some hidden tropical paradise somewhere in the tropical pacific.

Review: Basilosaurus (Age of the Dinosaurs by PNSO)

3.8 (26 votes)
Review and photos by Bokisaurus, edited by Suspsy
Many millions of years ago, the vast Tethys Sea covered what would one day be the deserts of the Middle East and other large parts of the world. The demise of the mighty aquatic marine reptiles, along with the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous opened up these vast oceans for a new cast of characters to take center stage and dominate.

Review: Basilosaurus (Recur)

4.3 (30 votes)

When anatomist Richard Harlan was presented with the fossil remains of a huge marine creature in 1834, he thought it must have been a reptile like Plesiosaurus or Mosasaurus, and therefore bestowed upon it the name Basilosaurus, “king lizard.” But when Sir Richard Owen later examined the teeth, he noted their double-rooted nature, which is a signature of mammals.

Review: Brontotherium (=Megacerops) (Mojö Fun)

4.3 (7 votes)
Review and photos by Megalosaurus, edited by Plesiossuria.
In 2012, CollectA released a pretty nice non-conventional toy model of a Megacerops (=‘Brontotherium’). This was good news for prehistoric mammal collectors. But in 2013, Mojö surprised us with the release of four prehistoric mammals.

Review: Diatryma (MPC)

4.2 (32 votes)

MPC’s fifth group of prehistoric animals included one truly original mold in the form of Diatryma (ie Gastornis), one of the earliest plastic representations of this icon from the post-Mesozoic age.

During the 1950s and 1960s, interest in paleontology was starting its climb back to mainstream interest, and companies like Marx took the initiative to start producing dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures in small plastic fashion for the first time, encouraging kids to create prehistoric worlds in their own homes.

Review: Diatryma and Phorusrhacos (Starlux)

4.4 (8 votes)
Review and photos by Lanthanotus, edited by Suspsy
A few months ago I stumbled upon pictures of several dinosaur figures made by the French company Starlux while I was reading through the “Recent Acquisitions” thread in the DTF. I looked up this company and found that they had made a great array of dinosaurs as well as some very obscure and rarely depicted prehistoric animals.

Review: Diatryma by Bullyland

3.9 (9 votes)

Bullyland Diatryma is a well done replica of an athletic, robust bird. Bullyland scores with a credible posture, nice colouring and some neat details. On the other hand one can say Bullyland perhaps interpreted Diatryma a little bit too clumsy.

Diatryma, nowadays better known under the name Gastornis, is an extinct genus of large flightless bird that lived during the late Paleocene and Eocene periods of the Cenozoic.

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