Age: Oligocene

Adansonia, Baobab (by Schleich and CollectA)

4.7 (19 votes)

The family of Baobabs is one of the most distinct and recognizable trees in the world. Eight species exist under the genus Adansonia, they are native to Subsaharaian Africa, Madagascar and Australia. The natural history of Baobabs is somewhat clouded and methods as molecular clocking yield debatable results.

Arsinoitherium (CollectA)

4.5 (17 votes)
Arsinoitherium was a large herbivorous denizen of swamps and rainforests during the late Eocene and early Oligocene eras. Despite its resemblance to a rhinoceros, it was more closely related to elephants, hyraxes, and sirenians.

Released by CollectA in 2014, this Arsinoitherium toy measures just about 18.5 cm long from the tips of its horns to the end of its tail.

Arsinoitherium (Prehistoric Life Collection by Safari Ltd)

4.1 (17 votes)
Arsinoitherium was a large paenungulate mammal which lived roughly 30 million years ago during the late Eocene and early Oligocene epochs in Northeastern Africa. These animals would have superficially resembled modern rhinoceroses but were in fact more closely related to elephants. Unlike those of a rhinoceros, the massive horns of Arsinoitherium were comprised of solid bone. 

Baluchitherium (Paraceratherium) (Lido-Nabisco)

3.6 (10 votes)

With an estimated length of 24.3’ (7.4 meters), shoulder height of 15.7’ (4.8 meters), and neck length of 6.6-8.2’ (2-2.5 meters), the Paraceratherium is believed to be the largest land mammal that has ever lived, or at the very least among the largest. Despite this astonishing fact, this gigantic hornless rhinoceros has been largely ignored in our hobby until recently.

Cohen’s Thingodonta/ Yalkaparidon (Lost Kingdoms Series A by Yowie)

4 (4 votes)

There aren’t many animals in the world known by their scientific name as opposed to a common name, yet the palaeo world seems to only use them, unless they are particularly well known, like the Woolly Mammoth or T. rex. That’s why I love this particular model, of an animal named Yalkaparidon (from the Aboriginal word for boomerang, based on the animals molar shape), but referred to in the common lexicon as Cohen’s Thingadonta, which is a brilliant name.

Copepteryx (Kaiyodo Dinotales Series 3)

5 (4 votes)
The Japanese toy company Kaiyodo isn’t afraid to tackle the obscure and one of the best examples of this would have to be the Kaiyodo Copepteryx. While other companies make and re-make the same tired old prehistoric favorites here we have Kaiyodo making a very obscure extinct bird that you’ve probably never heard of and who’s name I can never remember (maybe writing this review will fix that).

Daeodon (CollectA)

4.7 (14 votes)
The carcass is days old, decaying, and beset with insects, but that means nothing to the marauder. He seizes the prize in his monstrous jaws and crunches down decisively. Bone fragments, crushed marrow, rancid meat, and still-wiggling maggots all disappear down his throat. He pauses only to emit a wet belch before resuming his feast.

Dromornis (Yowies Lost Kingdom)

4.6 (5 votes)

Travelling through the wonderful world of Oz (as the Aussies tend to call their country) one sure plans some things before starting. I deceided to cramp a few toy figures into a box to take on the chance to shoot some of them in their “natural environment” – at least kind of, Australia sure changed a fair bit since most of the represented animals went extinct.

Entelodon (Mojö Fun)

4.8 (5 votes)
Despite their appearance and popular designation as “Hell” or “terminator” pigs the group scientifically knows as the entelodontidae are now thought to have been more closely related to whales and hippopotamuses. Regardless of their taxonomic affinity there is no denying the superficial resemblance the entelodonts have to pigs, and one has to wonder if they had a similar temperament to pigs and hippopotamuses as well.

Entelodont (AAA)

3.9 (8 votes)
Admittedly, there were lovelier animals to have walked the earth in prehistoric times than entelodonts, omnivorous beasts that were two metres tall and four metres long. Entelodonts were especially abundant in what are now Mongolia, China and Northern America and strolled through the landscape searching for any kind of food in the Eocene epoch – mainly probably carrion.

Fossil Whale/Mammalodon (Yowie Lost Kingdoms, Series B)

3.5 (4 votes)

Recently, a thought occurred to me. I’ve been reviewing ancient fauna for several years but, in spite of having a user name based on ancient cetacea, I have yet to review a fossil whale. Time to change that with none other than THE fossil whale. At least, what Yowie refer to as a fossil whale, Mammalodon.

Ginkgo (Deluxe by CollectA)

4.9 (8 votes)
What’s a nice prehistoric animal figure without the appropriate background? Right, so let’s have a look at another plant offering by CollectA…  
While being a recent species, Ginkgo biloba already existed long before any human had the brilliant idea to develop writing or another kind of reliable method to record dates or stories for generations to come and so setting the foundation for our modern understanding of history and therefore the time before.

Hyaenodon (AAA)

3.6 (7 votes)
Review and photos by Mihnea (Wildheart)
Existing for approximately 26 million years, Hyaenodonts were some of the largest predators of the Late Eocene and Early Miocene epochs. Their name comes from the sharp hyena-like teeth used to tear apart possible prey. The skulls of these animals were huge and well equipped for hunting, but their brains were quite small, something typical in primitive carnivorous mammals.
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