Author: Indohyus

Indohyus Growing up in the late 1990s and early 2000s was great for moulding me into a dino fan. Jurassic park films were fresh, and even better, the ‘Walking With’ trilogy was produced. I watched ‘Dinosaurs’ and then ‘Beasts’. Especially ‘Beasts’. From there, I went on digs across the U.K., and eventually got my degree in palaeontology from Portsmouth university. I am (at the time of writing this) doing my masters in anthropology and museum studies, hoping to become a curator. My love of plastic extinct animals is as strong as ever, and I dare say it will only get stronger!

All reviews by this author

Stegosaurus (Walking With Dinosaurs by Toyway)

4.8 (13 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
There comes a time in almost all dinosaur toy lines when three species must be immortalized in plastic: Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, and Stegosaurus, them being the most popular and well-known dinosaur species. With the exception of Triceratops, the Walking With Dinosaurs line is much the same, and I will be talking about one of these in this review: the Jurassic giant, Stegosaurus.

Rhamphorhynchus (Starlux)

3.8 (6 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
Once again I find myself in the origins of mass-produced dinosaur toys as I review another Starlux figure. Today I look at the pterodactyloid Rhamphorhynchus. Hailing from the Jurassic limestone of Solnhofen, Germany, it is among the oldest species to have been identified as an ancient reptile (though it was thought to have been a bird until teeth were found).

Rugops (CollectA)

3 (7 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
Over the last few years, toy companies have become more and more willing to be adventurous with their choice of species to be immortalized in plastic. CollectA is a great example of this, with one of the widest varieties of dinosaur and other prehistoric animal figures around.

Euoplocephalus (AAA)

4 (6 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
Ankylosaurs are often a popular group for toy companies to make. Like armoured tanks on legs, complete with a powerful club on the tail, these are very eye-catching and attractive to young children. As was the case with today’s review subject: Euoplocephalus by AAA, a toy company that was readily available when I was five years old or so.

Gallimimus (AAA)

3.8 (6 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
In recent years, the pantheon of ornithomimosaur figures has expanded more than ever before. Though still an underrepresented family of dinosaurs, these omnivorous/herbivorous theropods are very interesting oddities that only a few companies have tried to represent. Here is AAA’s attempt at a bird-mimic: Gallimimus, one of the largest members of the family.

Torosaurus (Walking With Dinosaurs by Toyway)

4.5 (8 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
When most dinosaur-related series cover ceratopsians, Triceratops is the animal most often chosen to be featured. However, while Triceratops made a cameo appearance as a T. rex‘s courtship offering in the BBC series Walking with Dinosaurs, the main ceratopsian was the lesser known Torosaurus instead (whether it or not it turns out to be a mature Triceratops, we will see).

Embolotherium (Jurassic Hunters by Geoworld)

4.2 (5 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
By now, we are all aware of the reputation of the Geoworld Jurassic hunters line: cheaply made figures, full of inaccuracies despite (false) claims of palaeontological approval and shameless plagiarism of palaeoartists. However, I wanted to investigate these figures personally, so I got a figure from each of the first three ‘expeditions’ and see what they were like.

Deinotherium (Starlux)

3.7 (9 votes)
Review and photographs by Indohyus, edited by Suspsy
Once again I find myself returning to the origins of dinosaur figurines, Starlux, to look at another animal reproduced long before other companies got to it. This time, it’s Deinotherium, the terrible beast! A relative of modern elephants, this powerful probiscidian could grow to 13 ft tall and weigh as much as 11 tonnes (based on the largest species, D.
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