Anomalocaris (CollectA)

4.8 (114 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972; edited by Suspsy

In 2023, CollectA added Anomalocaris canadensis to its growing collection of Paleozoic invertebrates, following fellow arthropod Redlichia and mollusks Passaloteuthis, Pleuroceras, Orthoceras, Cooperoceras, and Pravitoceras (not to mention an extant nautilus and horseshoe crab). At this point A. canadensis probably doesn’t need much of an introduction on the Blog (I myself have reviewed it three times previously).

Anomalocaris (Dino Mecard by Sono Kong)

3.3 (4 votes)
Review and photos by bmathison1972, edited by Suspsy
This is a review of the Anomalocaris figure in the Dino Mecard line by the Korean company Sono Kong, in conjunction with Choirock. Figures in this line appear to be based on a TV show and corresponding card game, similar to Dinosaur King or Pokemon.

Anomalocaris (The Great Old Sea by Takara Tomy A.R.T.S.)

4.4 (7 votes)

Review and photos by bmathison1972, edited by Suspsy

Today we are looking at Anomalocaris canadensis from the 2020 Takara Tomy A.R.T.S. set called The Great Old Sea. It is one of three figures in the set; the others being the trilobite Olenoides serratus and a coelacanth (which I presume is extant?).

Anomalocaris (Yowie)

4 (6 votes)
Review and photos by Faelrin, edited by Suspsy
For my first review, I will be reviewing the Yowie Anomalocaris. Anomalocaris was one of the largest creatures of its time, growing up to around 1 meter long (or 3.2 feet), and is one of the many species preserved in the Burgess Shale.

Cambrian Creatures Mini Model Collection (Favorite Co. Ltd.)

4.9 (9 votes)

Review and photos by bmathison1972, edited by Suspsy

Today, we will be looking at an overview of the Cambrian Creatures Mini Model collection released by Favorite Co. Ltd. in 2016. It consists of eight smaller models representing primarily Cambrian invertebrates along with one chordate. All the species presented have been found in the Burgess Shale deposits in North America.

Cambrian Life Toob (Safari Ltd.)

4.6 (16 votes)
Review and photos by Stemturtle, edited by Plesiosauria.
Wonderful ‘toob’! New for 2013, this collection illustrates the explosion of new animal phyla in the Cambrian Period, from 541 to 485 million years ago. The eight toys in this set are well-sculpted, good-sized, and colorful. Safari Ltd lists the range of sizes as 1.5” (4 cm) to 3” (7.5 cm).

Encyclopedia of the Paleozoic (Kaiyodo Capsule Q Museum)

5 (5 votes)
Review and photos by Tim Sosa, edited by Suspsy
The interval of Earth’s history which shows fossil evidence of animals is known as the Phanerozoic Eon (literally “visible animals”). The Phanerozoic is divided into three Eras. We live in the Cenozoic, which was preceded by the Mesozoic (during which dinosaurs were the largest terrestrial animals).

Hallucigenia (Kaiyodo vs. Trilobiti Design)

5 (6 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972, edited by Suspsy

Today we are going to look at the history of the enigmatic Cambrian animal Hallucigenia sparsa, by comparing an older, outdated model with one depicting the most recent concept of this species.

Hallucigenia sparsa was first described by Charles Doolittle Walcott as a polychaete worm in the genus Canadia.

Leaps in Evolution (Kaiyodo)

4.9 (9 votes)
Review and photographs by Tim Sosa
From July-October 2015, the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo hosted an exhibit called “Leaps in Evolution: Tracing the Path of Vertebrate Evolution.” To commemorate the exhibit, Kaiyodo made a set of five vending machine capsule figures, most representing a stage in the evolution of vertebrates.

Medusa (Bullyland)

4.8 (5 votes)
Summer melts us here since weeks, so time for another wet review….

Today I want you to introduce you to one of those creatures everybody knows, but knows almost nothing about, a jellyfish. Jellyfish are a very very old group of animals, they date back to the famous Ediacarian, more than 600 mya.

Opabinia “Oakley” (Paleo Pals)

4.8 (6 votes)

However you look at it, Opabinia was a remarkably odd-looking creature – so it’s a natural choice for a big cuddly plush toy, right?

I’m guessing most people wouldn’t look at a five-eyed worm with a snaggle-toothed trunk and react with, “Aw, how cute!” Granted, most people aren’t paleontology nerds, either, so your mileage may vary in perspective.

Opabinia (Soft Model by Favorite co.)

4.6 (8 votes)

This model is reconstructed with ample attention to detail for this alien-looking wonder from the Cambrian.

I’ve had a soft spot for the weirdos in nature since my early childhood, so Opabinia has always been a favorite of mine. This 3 inch long stem arthropod was a denizen of the ocean floors during the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 505 million years ago.

Opabinia regalis (Scientific Models by Trilobiti Design)

5 (8 votes)

Review and images by bmathison1972, edited by Suspsy

Opabinia regalis is an enigmatic arthropod (or arthropod-like animal) from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Lagerstätte of present-day British Columbia. It was a benthic predator, scouring the bottom of the Cambrian Seas for soft-bodied prey nearly 505 million years ago.

Paleozoic Creatures (Colorata)

5 (8 votes)

Colorata has been making boxed sets of dinosaurs for several years now, which occasionally include dinosaur contemporaries like pterosaurs or mosasaurs, but in December of 2017 they released their first boxed set of prehistoric figures featuring exclusively non-dinosaur taxa. Say hello to the Extinct Animals: Paleozoic Creatures set.

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