Classification: Ankylosaur

Review: Polacanthus (Definitely Dinosaurs by Playskool)

2.7 (7 votes)

Review and photos by Art Rex, edited by Suspsy

Before the release of Jurassic Park in 1993, Playskool’s Definitely Dinosaurs was one of the best brands of prehistoric playtime, rivaled only by Tyco’s Dino-Riders. Most of the Definitely Dinosaurs were relatively simple in design, almost cartoonish to play to a younger demographic.

Review: Polacanthus (Papo)

3.4 (19 votes)

The Early Cretaceous Wessex formation in England is rich in vertebrate fossils, including dinosaurs like Baryonyx and Iguanodon, pterosaurs like Caulkicephalus, many kinds of fish, and even some fragments of small mammals. Today we’ll take a look at one of the most heavily armored denizens of Early Cretaceous Eurasia, Polacanthus, as depicted by Papo.

Review: Polacanthus (Walking With Dinosaurs by Toyway)

WWDPolacanthus

4.5 (10 votes)
From a bygone age in which Toyway still made half-decent dinosaur figures comes this spiky beast, their rendition of the British ankylosaur Polacanthus, part of their terrifyingly collectible figure line originally released to accompany the TV series Walking With Dinosaurs (and long since discontinued).

Review: Prehistoric Animals (Panini, review part 1)

panini prehistoric animals playset

3.3 (6 votes)
Sticker albums are a staple of many a childhood and they were certainly a part of mine. However, unlike my school  contemporaries in the early 1990s, I didn’t deal with stickers of footballers or garbage pail kids, all my swapsies were dinosaur stickers of course! And the toys that came with them…

Panini’s Prehistoric Animals sticker album has been published in several editions over the decades going back to the 1970s.

Review: Prehistoric Animals (Panini, review part 2)

Panini prehistoric animals and dinosaur toys

4.3 (8 votes)
In part 1 of this review we looked at 12 dinosaur toys (and one pterosaur) from Panini’s Prehistoric Animals line. In part 2 we pick up where we left off to complete the full set of 24 toys.

Figure numbers 13 to 15 are a trio of marine reptiles, and their dark blue colour works very well for aquatic animals.

Review: Prehistoric Tube B (CollectA)

4.1 (13 votes)
Time again to downsize with CollectA’s second tube collection. Like the previous set I reviewed, this one came out in late 2015 and contains no fewer than ten teeny toy dinosaurs and other prehistoric monsters, a couple of them making their debut with CollectA.

First up is a bantam Amargasaurus, based on the Deluxe version.

Review: Saichania (Antediluvia Collection)(David Krentz)

4.4 (7 votes)
“Saichania” is Mongolian for “beautiful one.” Admittedly, this is not the sort of title one expects to find among ankylosaurs. After all, they don’t quite have the sleek and decorative appearance of other thyreophorans like Kentrosaurus, nor the poise and majesty of the classic Stegosaurus. And yet, armored dinosaurs possess a vast array of impressive adornments, more than just functional protection against predators.

Review: Saichania (Dinomania Series 1, by Kaiyodo)

4.1 (8 votes)
Kaiyodo is known for making excellent dinosaur sculpts with awesome coloring, for but many a fan’s grief, they’re sold only in Japan. from 2004 onward, some of these could be found in specialty stores across America, but the quantity was minimal and they were always gone very quickly.

Review: Saichania (original sculpt) (Replica-Saurus by Schleich)

2.6 (8 votes)
The Late Cretaceous ankylosaurid Saichania (which means “beautiful” in Mongolian) was a moderately sized but heavily armored dinosaur whose fossils were first discovered in southern Mongolia in 1977. Saichania was a squat animal which reached a maximum length of slightly over 20 feet, making it smaller than its more famous American cousin Ankylosaurus.

Review: Saichania (Small)(Schleich)

3.3 (12 votes)
Saichania, meaning “the beautiful one” in Mongolian, derives its name from the magnificent state of preservation the type specimen was found in. Like Ankylosaurus and Euoplocephalus, it was covered in heavy armour and bore a large club at the end of its tail. But whereas its North American relatives inhabited lush forests and floodplains, Saichania was adapted for the harsh life of the desert.

Review: Sauropelta (Jurassic World: Fierce Force by Mattel)

3 (14 votes)

Alas, nodosaurids will probably never be as famous and popular as their cousins the ankylosaurids, undoubtedly due to their narrower, less intimidating heads and their lack of bone-breaking tail clubs. Still, almost all of the major dinosaur toy companies have produced at least one nodosaurid over the years, and these have generally ranged from being pretty good to truly magnificent.

Review: Sauropelta (Replica-Saurus by Schleich)

3.2 (10 votes)
Sauropelta was a basal nodosaurid from the Early Cretaceous of North America, dating to around 115 million years ago. The name means “lizard shield”, pertaining to its intricate body armor. Compared to later, larger armored dinosaurs like Ankylosaurus, Sauropelta was a relatively small animal at roughly 16.5 feet long.

Review: Sauropelta (Wild Safari by Safari Ltd)

4.8 (23 votes)
Between marauding packs of Deinonychus and the hulking Acrocanthosaurus, the nodosaurid Sauropelta lived in extremely dangerous times. Fortunately, the “lizard shield” was more than capable of defending itself.

The 2015 Wild Safari Sauropelta measures 19 cm long from nose to tail tip.

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